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Philip Roscoe

Philip Roscoe

Reader in Management, University of St Andrews
I am interested in the role that markets play in contemporary organising: how markets form, how they configure organisations, and how individuals shape – and are shaped – by market practice. I'm especially interested in the moral and political issues that surround markets, and the discourses, valuations and justifications invoked in market settings. Working in a School of Management, I'm deeply aware of how these topics relate to managers, an interest reflected in my writing and teaching.

My work is located in the growing interdisciplinary field of 'market studies', informed by science and technology studies, as well as research into accounting and organisations. My research is empirically driven: I have, for example, written on the organisation of the Christmastime Santa experiences in Lapland, on the construction of 'fairness' in transplant allocation and how online dating enacts instrumentally rational, calculative romances. I have a long-standing interest in financial markets, often taking a critical perspective: I have written on the social construction of nonprofessional investors in the United Kingdom and Taiwan, and conducted a larger-scale research project documenting the birth and development of two small company focused stock-markets founded in London in the mid-1990s.

I have also written extensively on the creative industries. My monograph 'Creating economy: enterprise, intellectual property and the valuation of goods', with Professor Barbara Townley (St Andrews) and Dr Nicola Searle (Goldsmiths) is published by Oxford University Press. The book invokes the 'market studies' approach to explore how intellectual property organises the market for creative goods, making an important, timely and policy relevant contribution to ongoing debates over the nature and value of the creative industries.

I am committed to bringing academic research to the attention of as wide an audience as possible. My book I Spend Therefore I Am was published by Penguin in February 2014, and republished in paperback as A Richer Life in May 2015. It was described as 'a brilliant critique' by Lord Robert Skidelsky; 'Impressive. Important, very thoughtful and thought-provoking' by Ha-Joon Chang; and, 'a fine book, on the side of the angels' by the Guardian. I have written for the Guardian, Times Higher Education and the Literary Review, have appeared frequently on radio and television, and have given public lectures in the UK and abroad. In 2011 I was one of the ten winners of the inaugural AHRC BBC Radio 3 New Generation Thinkers scheme. You can find out more about my writing, speaking and broadcasting, as well as an occasional blog, on www.philip‌roscoe.net.

My most recent public engagement project takes the form of a podcast – How To Build a Stock Exchange: Making Finance Fit for the Future – launched in March 2019. The podcast explores financial markets as a sociological phenomenon, seeking to shed new light on an institution that we too often take for granted. You can follow on iTunes, Spotify, or Stitcher.

I joined the faculty at St Andrews in 2009, moving from Sup de Co Montpellier, where I was assistant professor of management. I hold a doctorate in management, from Lancaster University, exploring how non-professional stock-market investors are 'constructed' by investment service firms. I also worked in Lancaster as a post-doctoral researcher. Before starting my doctorate I spent six years working in financial journalism, prior to which I studied theology and medieval Arabic thought at the universities of Leeds and Oxford.

Hong Kong protests and Brexit could both end up benefiting financial elites

Aug 19, 2019 01:22 am UTC| Insights & Views Economy

Protests in Hong Kong have captured the worlds attention in recent weeks, with demonstrators closing streets and the airport, and Chinese forces amassing near the border with a none too subtle threat of violent reprisal....

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Economy

U.S. Treasuries slip ahead of host of FOMC members’ speeches

The U.S. Treasuries slipped slightly during Fridays afternoon session ahead of a host of speeches by members of the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) Williams and Rosengren, scheduled to be delivered today by 12:15GMT...

RBNZ likely to leave OCR on hold at 1.00 pct next week, leave door open to further cuts: ANZ Research

The Reserve Bank of New Zealand (RBNZ) is expected to leave the Overnight Cash Rate (OCR) on hold at 1.00 percent at its monetary policy meeting next Wednesday, but leave the door open to further cuts, according to the...

UK gilts suffer after BoE’s unchanged policy decision fails to create major market impact

The United Kingdoms gilts suffered during European trading hours Friday, after the Bank of Englands (BoE) unchanged monetary policy decision did not create any major economic impact on markets, thus making investors trade...

German bunds edge tad higher after August producer price index disappoints markets

The German bunds edged tad higher during European trading session Friday after the countrys producer price index (PPI) for the month of August, disappointed market participants, going into negative territory from the prior...

JGBs close mixed in silent trading session ahead of long weekend

The Japanese government bonds closed mixed on Friday as investors remained divided amid a silent session that barely witnessed data of major economic significance ahead of the countrys long weekend, following Autumn...

Politics

Melania Trump faces backlash over fashion choices on 9/11 anniversary

Melania Trumps commemoration of the September 11 attacks 18th anniversary has been marred with yet another fashion-related controversy. Online critics claimed that the stitch work on the back portion of the First Ladys...

Destroying parliaments leads to war – just look at history

UK Prime Minister Boris Johnsons recent prorogation of parliament has led many to fear that parliamentary democracy in Britain is unravelling. And now the High Court has ruled that Johnson acted lawfully in suspending it....

Where 'woke' came from and why marketers should think twice before jumping on the social activism bandwagon

First used in the 1940s, the term woke has resurfaced in recent years as a concept that symbolises awareness of social issues and movement against injustice, inequality, and prejudice. But popularity has diluted its...

Rudd's rental affordability scheme was a $1 billion gift to developers; Abbott was right to axe it

Most Australians are spending more of their income on housing than they used to, but low-income households are being squeezed the hardest. Many are in poverty, and many more are suffering financial stress. A growing...

John Legend tweets Melania Trump should praise Donald Trump more

The United States President Donald Trump has once again had a tweetstorm directed, this time, at John Legend and Chrissy Teigen. The All of Me singer responded by suggesting that POTUS might have calmed down if only the...

Science

New prostate cancer treatment delivers good result in week

There may not be a one-stop cancer cure available to the market yet, but scientists have developed more advanced treatment strategies that increase the survivability rate among cancer patients. Researchers from the United...

HIV hides in many places in the body, Belgian researchers confirm

HIV can hide within the patients body, making it difficult to completely eradicate. With the hopes of finding an HIV cure, researchers from the Belgium-based university UZ Gent recently reported a milestone of locating...

Can we really know what animals are thinking?

Sarah, the worlds smartest chimp, died in July 2019, just before her 60th birthday. For the majority of her life she served as a research subject, providing scientists with a window into the thoughts of homo sapiens...

Cancer cells naturally die in microgravity, scientist finds

The possibilities are endless when it comes to studying potential factors that could stop the growth of cancer cells. For one, a scientist based in Australia discovered that cancer cells naturally die when exposed to...

HIV cure study finds good results from a rare muscle illness

One of the greatest tasks of medical science experts today is finding a cure for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). While that has not been achieved yet, many studies have resulted in further understanding the...

Technology

‘Cyberpunk 2077’ release date: Immersion cited as the main reason why the game is in the first-person view

Cyberpunk 2077 has been created as a first-person shooter and that decision has led to some criticism from the gaming community. Accusations have been thrown on CD Projekt Reds feet that they went this route to save money...

PlayStation 5 could have a Pro version immediately in 2020

For Sony, PlayStation 4 is its first gaming platform where it introduced a more advanced variant that goes by the name of PS4 Pro. Its release made sense because, from the time the PS4 was launched in 2013 to the present,...

‘Dota 2’ trolls, account buyers hit by ban hammers; Valve rolling out changes to decrease in-game toxicity

The Dota 2 community has been asking Valve time and again to provide some form of solution to the persisting presence of smurfing, account buying, and overall toxic behavior. Now, the company is finally rolling out some...

Warriors apparently interested in adding Giannis Antetokounmpo into their roster

The rumor about Giannis Antetokounmpo possibly getting poached by the Golden State Warriors has resurfaced again. The narrative first emerged in February when Marc Stein of the New York Times said that the Warriors has...

Nvidia could launch 2 new Turing-based GPUs next month

While Intel still dominates the CPU and GPU markets, Nvidia and AMD are having a more exciting competition in the graphics card department. Leaks about the Navi 14 series have been the talk of the town in recent months,...
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