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Media Files: Media companies are mad as hell at tech giants and don't want to take it anymore. But what choice do they have?

By Matthew Ricketson Et Al

Media companies around the world are in an existential funk. The tech giants - Facebook, Google, Apple and Amazon - have built a better mousetrap for profiting from consumers attention than the traditional media can offer....

Trudeau's new cabinet: Gender parity because it's 2019? Or due to competence?

By Carol-Ann Rouillard Et Al

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will soon appoint his new cabinet, which he promises will once again be based on gender parity, the same as it was when he formed his first government in 2015. Women are in the minority in...

Demon disease, worse than HIV: Soweto women's views on breast cancer

By Emily Mendenhall

Low-income communities in South Africa have the lowest incidence of breast cancer in the country. But they also have the worst health outcomes. Black South African women are the least likely segment of the population to...

How the US military has embraced growing religious diversity

By Ronit Y. Stahl

In 1919, Lee Levinger buried four soldiers in France. The responsibility to preside over a funeral was not unusual for military chaplains. But during World War I, most Americans would have been surprised to learn that a...

Trump's charity woes are uncommmon if not unprecedented and could get more costly

By Philip Hackney

The Donald J. Trump Foundation is now defunct and the state of New York has ordered the president to give US$2 million to a group of nonprofits out of his own pocket as restitution for breaking the law by misusing...

Senators' silence suggests they may be taking their impeachment trial duty seriously

By Lynne H. Rambo

Several Republican senators have taken a vow of silence on the impeachment inquiry in the House of Representatives. Maine Senator Susan Collins has described her position this way: I am very likely to be a juror so to...

What the fall of the Berlin Wall and German unification have meant for educational inequality

By Markus Klein Et Al

When the Berlin wall fell 30 years ago, on November 9 1989, it marked the end of a 40-year divide between Germanys communist East and the free market system of the West. For people living either side of the wall, this...

In Berlin, hyper-gentrification has proved just how fast conflict-torn cities can change

By Jonathan Rock Rokem

Modern day Kreuzberg is one of Berlins most trendy and multicultural neighbourhoods. Its central location, dynamic mix of cafes, shops and nightlife, alongside residential streets and lucrative river views all fuse to...

Why Nixon's VP Spiro Agnew attacked the new media -- 50 years ago

By Thomas Alan Schwartz

Americans witnessed an unprecedented event 50 years ago: live television coverage on all three national networks of a speech by the vice president of the United States. Speeches by vice presidents never received such...

Running may help you live longer but more isn't necessarily better

By Željko Pedišić

Its free, requires no equipment and the scenery can be stunning its no wonder running is among the worlds most popular sports. The number of recreational runners in Australia has doubled from 2006 to 2014. Now more...

Thunberg and Obama: Did they interfere in the Canadian election?

By Marshall Palmer

Ahead of the 2019 Canadian federal election, many Canadians were concerned about the threat of foreign interference. Would foreign powers attempt to support one party over another? What sort of sensitive political...

California is living America's dystopian future

By Stephanie LeMenager

The Golden State is on fire, which means that an idea of American utopia is on fire, too. Utopias are the good places of our imagination, while dystopias are the places where everything goes terribly wrong, where evil...

Recycling plastic bottles is good, but reusing them is better

By Rachael Wakefield-Rann Et Al

Last week Woolworths announced a new food delivery system, in collaboration with US company TerraCycle, that delivers grocery essentials in reusable packaging. The system, called Loop, lets shoppers buy products from...

Asylum seekers left 'desperate' and 'helpless' when they try to find work in Australia

By Kiros Hiruy Et Al

Finding work can be a challenge for new migrants to Australia who often arrive with limited English skills and lack local contacts. But finding work for people seeking asylum can be even harder, as we found in a study...

What is ‘ecological economics’ and why do we need to talk about it?

By Anitra Nelson Et Al

This article is part of a series on rebalancing the humannature interactions that are central to the study and practice of ecological economics, which is the focus of the 2019 ANZSEE Conference in Melbourne later this...

Why is Japan's Olympic marathon shifting cities to avoid the heat? A sports physiologist explains

By Chloe Taylor

The International Olympic Committee last week decided to shift next years Olympic marathon from Tokyo to Sapporo to protect athletes from the heat. Tokyos average temperatures during the month of August exceed 30℃, with...

Why do young people join gangs? Members explain the appeal of risk taking

By Robert Hesketh

As the rate of knife crime continues to rise, there have been many attempts to investigate why some young people resort to potentially fatal violence: from problems at home, to a lack of opportunity or simply a desire to...

What 3,000-year-old Egyptian wheat tells us about the genetics of our daily bread

By Michael Scott

Human societies need food and that often means wheat, which was first cultivated more than 12,000 years ago. Today, around one in five calories consumed by humans is from wheat. Over this time, humans have moved wheat...

Climate crisis: the countryside could be our greatest ally – if we can reform farming

By Ian Boyd

Around 20% of the UKs farms account for 80% of the countrys total food production, and they do this on about half of all the farmed land there is. At least 80% of farms in the UK dont produce very much at all. In...

Virgin Galactic goes public and leads space tourism race

By Louis Brennan

Richard Branson rang the opening bell at the New York Stock Exchange on October 28 as Virgin Galactic became the first commercial spaceflight company to list on the stock market. It was valued at more than US$1 billion...

African countries can't industrialise? Yes, they can

By Wim Naudé

Narratives are essential. Humans are, after all, helpless story junkies. Business and economic success depend much more than is commonly acknowledged on getting the narrative right. And if there is a narrative where...

Violence in South Africa: the search for root causes

By Nicolette V Roman

South Africans are frequently reminded of just how violent the country is. Attacks on foreign nationals and the killing of women and children have been prominent in the news. The latest crime statistics show that between...

Lebanon: what protests against the sectarian elite mean for Hezbollah

By Adham Saouli

The national uprising that has engulfed Lebanon since mid-October is historic and revolutionary. Protests have continued across Lebanon, even after Prime Minister Saad Hariri resigned on October 29 saying he wanted to give...

UK election: who is standing down as an MP and will it change the campaign?

By Roger Awan-Scully

The days leading up to the 2019 general election campaign have brought numerous announcements of MPs deciding to leave parliament instead of contesting their seat. These include a significant number of people who are, or...

Why it's better to exercise before breakfast

By Rob Edinburgh

Exercise is recommended for people who are overweight or obese as a way to reduce their risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. But people dont always have time to exercise as much as they would...

As the coal industry shrinks, miners deserve a just transition – here's what it should include

By Ann Eisenberg

Murray Energy, one of the biggest private U.S. coal companies, has become the fifth coal company to file for bankruptcy in 2019. Union leaders and many elected officials worry that in addition to the 7,000 miners on...

Homicide is declining around the world – but why?

By Mateus Renno Santos Et Al

Americans are currently living in one of the lowest crime periods ever and so are many people in the rest of the world. Following decades of increasing crime during the 1960s, 70s and 80s, U.S. homicide rates declined...

Homeless: more than a third of people leaving prison say they have nowhere to go

By Graham Bowpitt

Imagine for a moment youre being released from prison after a 12-month sentence for theft. Youre clean, off drugs, its been tough, but youre looking forward to starting a new life. You leave prison and head to the nearest...

For a sustainable future, we need to reconnect with what we're eating – and each other

By Anna Davies Et Al

Eating alone, once considered an oddity, has become commonplace for many across the Western world. Fast food chains are promoting eating on the go or al desko. Why waste time in your busy day sitting down at a table with...

We asked 13 economists how to fix things. All back the RBA governor over the treasurer

By Peter Martin1

Thirteen leading economists have declared their hands in the stand off between the government and the Governor of the Reserve Bank over the best way to boost the economy. All 13 back Reserve Bank Governor Philip...

Is the Morrison government 'authoritarian populist' with a punitive bent?

By Carol Johnson

In a recent interview Malcolm Turnbull raised the possibility that these days many so-called conservatives in the Liberal Party might be better described as authoritarian populists. It would be easy to dismiss his...

Opioid dependence treatment saves lives. So why don't more people use it?

By Suzanne Nielsen

In Australia last year, 1,123 people died from opioids illicit drugs such as heroin, and pain relievers such as codeine, oxycodone and morphine. If used regularly, physical and psychological dependence can develop. In...

Strippers on film: battlers, showgirls and hustlers

By Ari Mattes

In her landmark 1975 essay, Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema, Laura Mulvey argues classical Hollywood style is built upon the fetishisation of the female body. Female characters are frequently photographed in wide,...

Caught red-handed: automatic cameras will spot mobile-using motorists, but at what cost?

By Ian J. Faulks

Over the years, advances in technology and transport policy have greatly impacted drivers. In the 1980s this came in the form of random breath testing, and more recently, mobile drug testing. A new policing tool under...

How we feel about our cars means the road to a driverless future may not be smooth

By Raul A. Barreto

There is a reasonable expectation that autonomous vehicles will dominate the future of transport. Utopian visions suggest these driverless vehicles will lead to dramatic changes to our cities and their...

Australia's only active volcanoes and a very expensive fish: the secrets of the Kerguelen Plateau

By James Dell

Stretching towards Antarctica lies a hidden natural oasis - a massive underwater plateau created when continents split more than 100 million years ago. Straddling the Indian and Southern Oceans, the Kerguelen Plateau is...

Another approach to online platforms is possible: cooperation

By Mélissa Boudes Et Al

So-called collaborative platforms have been popular since their appearance in the late 2000s, but there is growing societal concern. On the technological end, their are questions concerning their use of personal data as...

Gen Xers, millennials and even some Gen Zs choose vinyl & drive record sales up

By Marina Eckersley

Vinyl sales have been surging in the last few years, as CD sales stay flat and digital downloads decrease. In the United Kingdom, data from 2016 reveals that vinyl LP sales revenue surpassed that of digital downloads. And...

Canada needs a China strategy, and the western provinces should lead the way

By Robert J. Hanlon

Its now confirmed that Prime Minister Justin Trudeaus latest envoy to China has met with two detained Canadians at the heart of an ongoing diplomatic row between Canada and the Chinese. It was Ambassador Dominic Bartons...

What universities can do to keep students from dropping out

By Lenin Cavalcanti Guerra Et Al

The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) reports that in 36 countries, only 39 per cent of bachelors degree students graduate within the expected duration of their program. Another 28 per cent do...

Gender inequality in education is still an issue in Kenya and South Africa

By Beatrice Akala

Women still arent fully represented in higher education in Kenya and South Africa, despite changes in law and policy over the years. This failure of the education sector to harness and develop womens talents curtails their...

The burden of showing Springbok support in the 21st century

By Francois Cleophas

The Rugby World Cup 2019 is done and dusted, with South Africa securing victory over England in the final match. But a question still lingers: was it a burden for some, maybe many, South Africans who supported their...

Mississippi governor's race taking place under Jim Crow-era rules after judge refuses to block them

By Gideon Cohn-Postar

A federal judge ruled on Nov. 1 that he would not stop Mississippi voters from electing a governor on Tuesday under an old, Jim Crow-era election law that a civil rights lawsuit argues perpetuates white supremacy and...

The UK's 2019 election cannot be a re-run of the 2017 campaign

By Christopher Kirkland

The UK is due to go to the polls on December 12 in an attempt to overcome parlaiments impasse over Brexit. Given the latest missed deadline of October 31, it seems inevitable that Brexit will dominate this campaign. Boris...

Three reasons why we need to talk about the mental health of political leaders

By Ian Hughes

As the impeachment investigation gathers pace on Capitol Hill, some commentators have argued that if Donald Trump remains the Republican presidential candidate in 2020, there is no way the election could be deemed...

Heart disease risk starts young – improving teenager health is essential

By Michaela James Et Al

Heart disease causes an estimated 31% of all deaths worldwide each year. While the condition is often associated with older adults, rising childhood inactivity and poor fitness levels mean that the risk factors associated...

"I risked my life in the back of a lorry to reach the UK from Iran"

By Forough Ramezankhah

Its still unclear what circumstances led to 31 men and eight women to climb inside a refrigerated lorry, headed to the UK, for what would become their last journey. And its not yet known if this was the work of people...

Yes, the research confirms: Managers shouldn't sleep with subordinates

By Vanessa K. Bohns

U.S. Rep. Katie Hill recently stepped down after information about an affair with a campaign staffer, and allegations of one with a congressional staffer, came to light. The second affair would violate the House of...

Five ways commuting on the London Underground has and hasn't changed in the last century

By James Fowler

The London Underground opened in 1863, more than 150 years ago. A lot has changed since then but a lot of the gripes about travelling on the tube remain the same. A pretty standard list of current complaints includes: its...

How failing power utility is fuelling South Africa's economic crisis

By Mark Swilling

South Africas state power utility Eskom is the biggest challenge facing the country. Mess up Eskom, and you mess up the country. And it looks as though key players are doing just that. The past two weeks will be...

Apple, Disney and Netflix's streaming battle isn't winner-take-all

With the recent launch of Apple TV Plus and the imminent arrival of Disney Plus, the video landscape has never looked so competitive. These services join a crowded marketplace of subscription streaming services that...

RBNZ likely to keep OCR unchanged at November MPS, forecast to be unchanged from August: Westpac Research

07:45 AM| Commentary Central Banks Economy

The Reserve Bank of New Zealand (RBNZ) is expected to keep the Overnight Cash Rate (OCR) on hold at its monetary policy meeting this week and deliver a statement similar to its September OCR Review, according to the latest...

Chinese yuan likely to advance in coming weeks, remain susceptible to developments in US-China trade talks: Scotiabank

06:39 AM| Commentary Economy

The Chinese yuan is still expected to advance in the coming weeks, while remaining susceptible to developments in the ongoing US-China trade talks, according to the latest research report from Scotiabank. Although...

Regulatory Series on Cryptocurrencies: US IRS Grills Crypto Tax Evaders

06:30 AM| Research & Analysis Digital Currency Insights & Views

Of late, the tax authorities have been constantly shedding light on crypto-taxation norms. Recently, the British tax, payments and customs authority, Her Majestys Revenue and Customs (HMRC), has updated its...

Australian bonds gain ahead of October employment report; U.S.-China trade doubts continue

04:54 AM| Commentary Economy

The Australian government bonds gained during Asian session of the first trading day of the week Monday ahead of the countrys employment report for the month of October, scheduled to be released later this week amid...

U.S. healthcare companies’ business activity contracts at rapid pace in October

18:59 PM| Commentary

Healthcare companies in the U.S. saw the most rapid contraction in business activity in more than three years in October, showed the latest U.S. Sector PMI. Although the fall was just modest overall, it was the first such...

French industrial production rebounds slightly in September, output drops in Q3 2019

15:34 PM| Commentary

French industrial production rebounded in September. Sequentially, the industrial production grew 0.3 percent, following the fall of 0.9 percent in the prior month. The manufacturing industry recovered, growing 0.6 percent...

Top Stories

Hackers are now targeting councils and governments, threatening to leak citizen data

By Roberto Musotto Et Al - 09:19 AM| Insights & Views Technology

In recent weeks, Johannesburgs computer network was held for ransom by a hacker group called Shadow Kill Hackers. This was the second time in three months a ransomware attack has hit South Africas largest city. This time,...

Indonesia's first scientific data bank is a step toward strengthening 'open data' practices

By Luthfi T. Dzulfikar - 09:19 AM| Insights & Views Technology Law

A large number of researchers among Indonesias scientific community have been known to perform unethical data tampering. Many manipulate statistical data to gain a reputation as a researcher who publishes the most under...

Smart tech systems cut congestion for a fraction of what new roads cost

By Hussein Dia - 09:20 AM| Insights & Views Technology

The new transport projects governments are constantly announcing are expensive. In the recent New South Wales and Victorian elections, the returned state governments transport infrastructure promises added up to A$165...

UK election 2019: hundreds of thousands of people could be in the wrong place when it's time to vote

By Ron Johnston Et Al - 09:25 AM| Insights & Views Politics

The UK general election called for December 12 2019 raises important issues regarding who is entitled to vote, who will be able to vote and where they will vote. The electoral roll, which lists everyone eligible to...

Fracking: how the police response is threatening the right to protest

By Will Jackson - 09:26 AM| Insights & Views Politics

The UK government has announced an immediate moratorium on fracking. The decision came after new scientific analysis concluded it was not possible to rule out future unacceptable impacts. Opponents of the controversial...

Where Brexit will leave the UK's human rights diplomacy

By Sean Molloy Et Al - 09:25 AM| Insights & Views

The UK has played a leading role within the UNs Human Rights Council (HRC) since its creation in 2006 as the main international body responsible for the promotion and protection of human rights around the world. But when...

E-bikes are coming to federally owned trails: 4 questions answered

By John Freemuth - 09:26 AM| Insights & Views Life

Editors note: In August, Interior Secretary David Bernhardt announced an order stating that electric bicycles will be allowed on all trails on federally owned land where normal bikes can ride. The move has led to some...

Econotimes Series

Economy

German bunds mixed after improvement in Nov ZEW economic sentiment fails to create impact

The German bunds remained narrowly mixed during European trading session Tuesday after an improvement in the countrys ZEW economic sentiment data for the month of November failed to create any significant impact on debt...

UK gilts nearly steady on mixed September employment report; October CPI in focus

The United Kingdoms gilts remained nearly flat during European trading hours Tuesday after the countrys labour market report for the month of September remained mixed. However, Britains consumer price inflation (CPI) for...

Fed likely to adopt only one rate cut in 3 to 6 months ahead, BoE to cut in Jan’20: Danske Bank

The Federal Reserve is expected to adopt only one rate cut in 3 to 6 months ahead; the timing of the cut is difficult but, as the Fed wants to see how things play out, the March meeting is probably the earliest...

Australia’s business conditions recover slightly in October, capacity utilisation declines

Australias business conditions and confidence recovered a little ground in October. While there is still a long way to go before a recovery can be considered in the private sector, there were some tentatively positive...

Australian bonds jump in muted trading ahead of October employment report

The Australian government bonds jumped during Asian session of the second trading day of the week Tuesday amid a muted day that witnessed data of little economic significance ahead of the countrys employment report for the...

Politics

What happens to the East Wing if Donald Trump and Melania Trump get divorced

Even before winning the election, Donald Trumps statements and actions during campaign rallies were enough to cause a string of controversies. It was then not surprising that it continued even after he won the 2016...

Donald Trump reportedly implies Melania Trump would not cry if he got shot

Melania Trump and Donald Trump have been relentlessly hounded by divorce rumors after the latter was elected the President of the United States. They have denied such claims and insisted their marriage is going well, but a...

What a minority government could mean for affordable housing in Canada

Along with climate change, affordable housing was one of the big issues of the recent Canadian federal election, with political parties scrambling to catch up with public opinion. The widespread concern among the...

Will Canada finally get pharmacare?

When I had lymphoma 12 years ago, I needed to take the drug filgrastim (Neupogen) to get my white blood cell count high enough that I could take my next chemotherapy treatment on time. Before prescribing it, my oncologist...

Government to announce more home care packages for aged before Christmas

More federal government money will be announced within weeks for home care for the aged, after a damning royal commission finding that many people die before their packages arrive. Scott Morrison on Friday said he had...

Science

Nearly all your devices run on lithium batteries. Here's a Nobel Prizewinner on his part in their invention – and their future

British-born scientist M. Stanley Whittingham, of Binghamton University, was one of three scientists who won the 2019 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their work developing lithium-ion batteries. L-R: John Goodenough;...

Advances in anti-ageing research: how chemistry could hold the key to better health

Given the opportunity to live much longer lives, many of us might feel less than thrilled at the prospect. After all, you might think, who would want to live an extra 20 years dealing with arthritis, dementia or heart...

Dark energy: new experiment may solve one of the universe's greatest mysteries

As an astronomer, there is no better feeling than achieving first light with a new instrument or telescope. It is the culmination of years of preparations and construction of new hardware, which for the first time collects...

Predicting research results can mean better science and better advice

We ask experts for advice all the time. A company might ask an economist for advice on how to motivate its employees. A government might ask what the effect of a policy reform will be. To give the advice, experts often...

Asteroid impact that could end humanity is happening, space nation leader claims

Asteroids are the most common space objects that fly by Earth almost daily. Some of them were detected too close to the time of their close approach, but there has never been an impact that took place in modern history....

Technology

‘The Sims 5’ would likely launch with configurable stairs

The developers are keeping their silence about the plans for The Sims 5. But, thanks to massive gameplay upgrades on the current game, fans of the franchise are not exactly clueless on what could be included in the next...

‘World of Warcraft: Shadowlands’ introduces a new leveling scheme

World of Warcraft: Shadowlands was one of the biggest announcements at the recently held BlizzCon 2019 last weekend. Like most fans have already anticipated, it is the games eighth expansion. But aside from the new...

Pixelbook Go with 16GB RAM, Core i5 ships November 18

Pixelbook Go will have more configurations to be released later this month, and possibly by next year. Google has finally put a release date on the laptops variant with 16GB RAM capacity. The good news is that orders can...

‘PUBG Mobile’ update 0.15.5 adds new TDM map, opens Royale Pass Season 10

Team Deathmatch, or simply known as TDM, is one of the newest gameplay modes added to PUBG Mobile this year. Following the release of another game mode, developers are showing TDM some love by adding a new and exclusive...

Tesla vehicles might drive themselves at a drive-thru soon

It can be said that some of the most technologically-advanced vehicles today are coming from Tesla. Aside from electric-powered cars that can drive itself on freeways and parking lots, Tesla has also developed a system...
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