Menu

Search

Featured Post

ChatGPT’s use of a soundalike Scarlett Johansson reflects a troubling history of gender-stereotyping in technology

By Alex Borkowski

Actress Scarlett Johansson released a statement this week expressing anger and concern that OpenAI used a voice eerily similar to her own as a default voice for ChatGPT. The voice in question, called Sky, has been...

Why knock down all public housing towers when retrofit can sometimes be better?

By Trivess Moore Et Al

The Victorian government is planning Australias largest urban renewal project. The plan is to knock down and rebuild 44 large public housing towers in Melbourne. The government says these towers, built in the 1960s and...

Life’s big moments can impact an entrepreneur’s success – but not always in the way you’d expect

By Pi-Shen Seet Et Al

Entrepreneurs are the lifeblood of any innovative economy. New business creation has been shown to have a significant and positive impact on economic growth, innovation and job creation. But it isnt easy, and most new...

Drug companies pay doctors over A$11 million a year for travel and education

By Barbara Mintzes Et Al

Drug companies are paying Australian doctors millions of dollars a year to fly to overseas conferences and meetings, give talks to other doctors, and to serve on advisory boards, our research shows. Our team analysed...

South Africa: Gold mine pollution is poisoning Soweto’s water and soil – study finds food gardens are at risk

By Lesego Khomo

For 140 years, gold mines in Johannesburg, South Africa have been leaking wastewater contaminated with heavy metals. The acid mine drainage from Johannesburgs estimated 278 abandoned mines and 200 mine dumps includes...

Here’s how machine learning can violate your privacy

By Jordan Awan

Machine learning has pushed the boundaries in several fields, including personalized medicine, self-driving cars and customized advertisements. Research has shown, however, that these systems memorize aspects of the data...

We tracked secret Russian missile launchers in Ukraine using public satellite data

By Adam Bartley Et Al

In the occupied far east of Ukraine, Russian forces are aiming waves of missiles against Ukrainian civilian targets. Each of Russias state-of-the-art missile launch systems costs more than US$100 million (A$150 million)....

Was Beethoven truly the greatest?

By Philip Ewell

On May 7, 1824, Ludwig van Beethovens Ninth Symphony premiered in Vienna, Austria. On its 200th anniversary, much was made about this seminal achievement of a composer routinely touted as the greatest master who ever...

Met Gala: what fairytales can teach us about modern fashion trends

By Cath Davies

Fairytales have long woven magic with fabric. But this years Met Gala, the annual fundraiser for the the Metropolitan Museum of Arts Costume Institute in New York, took the connection between fantasy and fashion a step...

Synced brains: why being constantly tuned in to your child’s every need isn’t always ideal

By Pascal Vrticka

Its crucial for healthy child development that children can form secure attachment bonds with their parents. Decades of research identified one key ingredient for this process: the coordination of parents and childrens...

Will government investment make green hydrogen a reality in Australia?

By Kylie Turner Et Al

In the budget last week, the government was keen to talk about its efforts to turn Australia into a renewable superpower under the umbrella of the Future Made in Australia policies. Future Made is a framework that sets...

Can Iran avoid a political crisis after its president’s death?

By Ali Mamouri

The death of President Ebrahim Raisi in a helicopter crash this week occurred during one of the Islamic Republic of Irans most challenging periods. Raisi, a prominent figure in the political elite, held substantial sway...

What is fate? And how can it both limit and liberate us?

By Michael Allen Fox

The concept of fate, or the idea of fatefulness, seems to crop up everywhere we look in one form or another. Fate is a key belief enduring across cultures and generations. What is fate? Generally speaking, fate is...

A pest of our own making: revealing the true origins of the not-so-German cockroach

By Theo Evans Et Al

German cockroaches thrive in buildings all over the world. Theyre one of the most common cockroach species, causing trouble for people both here and overseas. But in nature, theyre nowhere to be found. Just how this...

Smoking fentanyl can cause irreversible brain damage, report shows

By Colin Davidson

A middle-aged American man with no previous medical history was found unconscious in his hotel room, with unidentified crushed pills and a white residue on a nearby table, according to a recent paper in BMJ Case Reports....

Small businesses can help South Africa fight unemployment if they get proper support – study

By Karikari Amoa-Gyarteng Et Al

South Africa has an alarming unemployment rate of approximately 32.1%. Solutions have been elusive. The unemployment rate has been consistently high for decades. Our research has revolved around entrepreneurship. We...

California is about to tax guns more like alcohol and tobacco

By Topher L. McDougal

Starting in July 2024, California will be the first state to charge an excise tax on guns and ammunition. The new tax an 11% levy on each sale will come on top of federal excise taxes of 10% or 11% for firearms and...

Crypto: what you need to know about the water parasite making people ill in Devon

By Lee Hutt

For the past two weeks, people in the south Devon town of Brixham have started contracting the disease known as crypto. There are now about 16,000 homes and businesses at risk of crypto infection due to contaminated...

US election: why Latino and Hispanic voters are shifting to Trump after a long history of supporting the Democrats

By Paul Whiteley

Several recent polls suggest that the Hispanic and Latino vote is shifting towards Donald Trump as the election moves closer. In a YouGov poll from May 8, 43% of Americans said they would vote for President Joe Biden...

Oral retinoids can harm unborn babies. But many women taking them for acne may not be using contraception

By Antonia Shand Et Al

Oral retinoids are a type of medicine used to treat severe acne. Theyre sold under the brand name Roaccutane, among others. While oral retinoids are very effective, they can have harmful effects if taken during...

Australia is set to ban live sheep exports. What will this mean for the industry?

By Alan Renwick1

This month the federal government announced a plan to ban live sheep exports, set to come into effect from May 1 2028. The announcement coincided with the release of a highly anticipated report by an independent panel...

Why has an Israel-Hamas ceasefire been so elusive?

By Marika Sosnowski

Ever since armed conflict has existed, ceasefires have been thought of as a bridge between war and peace. Consequently, their success has been measured by their ability to stop violence between warring parties for a period...

Ancient DNA from an extinct native duck reveals how far birds flew to make New Zealand home

By Nic Rawlence Et Al

Ask a bird lover if they have heard of the extinct giant moa or its ancient predator, Haasts eagle, and the answer will likely be yes. The same cant be said of New Zealands extinct, but equally unique, mergansers a group...

South African communities vs Shell: high court victories show that cultural beliefs and practices count in climate cases

By Louise du Toit Et Al

When the Shell petroleum company announced in 2021 that it wanted to explore for fossil fuels off South Africas pristine Wild Coast, Indigenous communities in the area immediately fought back through the countrys...

Why the New Yorker blocked UK website readers from its Lucy Letby story – an expert explains

By Polly Rippon

A 13,000-word article in The New Yorker magazine about convicted murderer Lucy Letby is blocked to UK online readers. Conservative MP David Davis claimed preventing members of the UK public reading the essay seemed in...

UK ‘taking back control’ of its borders risks rolling back human rights protections

By Katy Hayward

The High Court in Belfast has ruled that key elements of the UKs Illegal Migration Act are incompatible with the Windsor framework and should not be applied in Northern Ireland. Once again, Northern Ireland appears to be a...

Infected blood scandal – what you need to know

By Emma Cave Et Al

The infected blood scandal has been hailed the worst treatment disaster in the history of the NHS. Over 3,000 people have died as a result of receiving contaminated blood products in the 1970s, 80s and 90s, and it is...

Slovakia’s polarised politics: Robert Fico warned a politician could be violently attacked weeks before assassination attempt

By Tomas Sniegon

Slovak society is in shock after a 71-year-old man fired five shots at the prime minister, Robert Fico, while he was greeting a small crowd after a meeting. Some members of the coalition government immediately blamed...

Extreme heatwaves in south and south-east Asia are a sign of things to come

By Neven S. Fučkar

Since April 2024, wide areas of south and south-east Asia, from Pakistan to the Philippines, have experienced prolonged extreme heat. Covering some of the most densely populated regions in the world, the series of...

Beijing is walking a fine line between support for Russia and not angering the west too much

By Marcin Kaczmarski Et Al

Russias Vladimir Putin and Chinas Xi Jinping have announced they will work together more closely to offset US pressure as part of Putins two-day state visit to China. Putin is seeking to firm up his relationship with...

Attempted assassination of Slovak prime minister follows country’s slide into political polarization

By Alexandria Wilson-McDonald

The assassination attempt against Slovakian Prime Minister Robert Fico has been widely condemned by world leaders as an attack on democracy. In Slovakia, the violent act similarly saw a unified response from the...

Some states’ populations are very much like the US overall – including 5 key states in the 2024 presidential election

By Rogelio Sáenz Et Al

Five of the seven states widely expected to be political battlegrounds in the 2024 presidential election have populations very much like that of the U.S. overall, in a range of demographic and socioeconomic...

What is pasteurization?

By Kerry E. Kaylegian

Recent reports that the H5N1 avian flu virus has been found in cows milk have raised questions about whether the U.S. milk supply is safe to drink. According to the federal Food and Drug Administration, the answer is yes,...

History says tariffs rarely work, but Biden’s 100% tariffs on Chinese EVs could defy the trend

By Tinglong Dai

In June 2019, then-presidential candidate Joe Biden tweeted: Trump doesnt get the basics. He thinks his tariffs are being paid by China. Any freshman econ student could tell you that the American people are paying his...

Modi’s anti-Muslim rhetoric taps into Hindu replacement fears that trace back to colonial India

By Archana Venkatesh

The worlds largest election is currently under way in India, with more than 960 million people registered to vote over a period of six weeks. Spearheading the campaign for his Bharatiya Janata Party, incumbent Prime...

Newsrooms are experimenting with generative AI, warts and all

By Nir Eisikovits

The journalism industry has been under immense economic pressure over the past two decades, so it makes sense that journalists have started experimenting with generative AI to boost their productivity. An Associated...

College sports fandom shows how a shared goal can bring people together

By Amy Parsons

After Colorado State University beat Virginia in the first round of March Madness, the campus erupted in celebration. A few days later, when the team lost to Texas, Rams groaned in shared disappointment. Between and around...

Kenya’s flood evictions may violate the law - scholar

By Smith Ouma

Recent floods in Kenya have left at least 270 people dead, displaced more than 200,000 and destroyed property, infrastructure and livelihoods across the country. In Nairobi, hundreds of people in informal settlements were...

Why gymgoers should be wary of using testosterone supplements to boost their gains

By Colin Michie

The desire for a sculpted physique is driving some amateur gymgoers to experiment with synthetic steroids specifically, testosterone supplements. This trend is largely being driven by social media, with thousands of posts...

The joy of birdwatching: research shows it can improve mental health and foster a sense of wellbeing

By Jolanta Burke1

The mental health benefits of being in nature have long been acknowledged, whether through activities like listening to birdsong or taking a walk in the park. While birdwatchers are often portrayed as boring, it turns...

The King’s first portrait – understanding the image Charles wants to project for his reign

By Gabriele Neher

It looks as if many people are seeing red when it comes to the first official portrait of King Charles III. Reactions to Jonathans Yeos monumental portrait have certainly been mixed. Fundamentally, this is the most...

The budget has earmarked $8.6 million for live music. Is it enough to save the flailing industry?

By Catherine Strong Et Al

Leading music organisations have praised the federal budget for its investment in the live music sector. The budget includes A$8.6 million for a program called Revive Live: to provide essential support to live...

ChatGPT is now better than ever at faking human emotion and behaviour

By Marcel Scharth

Earlier this week OpenAI launched GPT-4o (o for omni), a new version of the artificial intelligence (AI) system powering the popular ChatGPT chatbot. GPT-4o is promoted as a step towards more natural engagement with AI....

Nuclear subs are coming to Australia

By Ian Lowe

For decades, Australia has exported uranium but not used it, other than in the Lucas Heights research reactor. But change is coming. We now face a rapidly deepening commitment to the nuclear industry, through nuclear...

After 180 years, new clues are revealing just how general anaesthesia works in the brain

By Adam D Hines

Over 350 million surgeries are performed globally each year. For most of us, its likely at some point in our lives well have to undergo a procedure that needs general anaesthesia. Even though it is one of the safest...

Out with the old: Blue- and white- collar job labels aren’t cutting it anymore

By Nachum Gabler

The old way of classifying jobs as blue- or white-collar is no longer relevant in Canadas modern labour market. Our 21st century economy and workforce are too complex to boil jobs and work categories down to a simple blue-...

Cancer drug pollution is a growing global concern

By Valérie Langlois Et Al

As incidence of cancer increases globally, the use of cancer drugs is also growing at a rate of approximately 10 per cent per year in developed countries. Pharmaceuticals significantly contribute to the improvement of...

Why do American rappers see Drake as not Black enough?

By Alexandra Boutros

The epic beef between rappers Kendrick Lamar and Drake has once again demonstrated the linguistic acrobatics of rap culture. The feud has seen both artists release multiple tracks where they lyrically diss each other....

Delays in western aid have put Ukraine in a perilous position

By James Horncastle

Russia recently began another offensive against Ukrainian forces, this time in the Kharkiv region. This attack was not a surprise development Russian forces had been preparing themselves over several months for the...

Gaza update: why neither ceasefire talks nor the Rafah offensive appear to be working

By Sam Phelps

Israels prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, addressed his countrymen on Monday as the country marked its 76th day of independence. His narrative was predictably defiant. He trotted out his usual line that the war would not...

What OpenAI’s deal with News Corp means for you

OpenAI, the makers of ChatGPT, and News Corp, the international media conglomerate, have signed a deal that will let OpenAI use and learn from News Corps content. In practical terms, this means when a user asks ChatGPT...

Top Stories

Global Geopolitics Series

Ukraine recap: Putin on top as Kyiv scrambles to play catch-up on the battlefield

By Jonathan Este - 08:10 AM| Insights & Views

Vladimir Putin has been looking pretty chipper of late. Two weeks ago saw him wearing his trademark vulpine smile as he presided over the Victory Day commemorations in Moscow. It was a rather more upbeat occasion than in...

How Modi is using TV, film and social media to sway voters in India’s election

By Vinita Srivastava - 03:42 AM| Insights & Views Politics

As the worlds largest electorate goes to the polls in India, political parties are seeking to sway voters through popular culture, like film. Although cinema has long reflected and influenced the countrys political and...

Why the upcoming South African election a massive milestone for the ruling ANC

By Stephen Chan - 03:43 AM| Insights & Views Politics

South Africans governing party, the African National Congress (ANC), is in trouble. After 30 years in charge, it is scrambling for support ahead of the upcoming national elections. The ANC has run the country since the...

How Iran selects its supreme leader

By Eric Lob - 03:44 AM| Insights & Views Politics

The sudden death of President Ebrahim Raisi is unlikely to drastically alter Irans foreign and domestic policies, but it has left a power vacuum. As stipulated by the constitution, Raisi was replaced by his first vice...

TikTok law threatening a ban if the app isn’t sold raises First Amendment concerns

By Anupam Chander Et Al - 06:16 AM| Insights & Views Law

TikTok, the short-video company with Chinese roots, did the most American thing possible on May 7, 2024: It sued the U.S. government, in the person of Attorney General Merrick Garland, in federal court. The suit claims the...

Electric cars: swappable batteries could be the way to revive flagging sales

By ManMohan S Sodhi - 06:14 AM| Insights & Views Technology

The rate of adoption of electric vehicles (EVs) in western countries continues to wane. In the UK, EVs market share of all new cars for 2024 will barely hit 20%, somewhat below the government goal of 22%. New car...

Econotimes Series

Economy

Latest inflation figures are good news

The U.S. economy is slowing, but not crashing. In the dismal science, this is what counts as good news. Thats the message I took away from the latest inflation data, released May 15, 2024, which showed U.S. consumer...

The budget is full of good news, but good news isn’t the same as good management

This years budget has something for everyone, with very little in the way of cuts and no new taxes. Its a classic good news pre-election budget. Whether it is too good to be true hinges on whether this budget...

Interest rates: the ugly dilemma facing Europe’s central banks – and why it’s a mistake to cut too soon

Central banks in Europe are discovering an old dilemma: when they lower interest rates because inflation is slowing down, its likely to weaken their currencies. This in turn may delay the fall in inflation towards their...

Europe is still in short-term crisis mode over Ukraine and lacks a vision for its post-war identity

Some believe that the war in Ukraine has fundamentally changed Europe, giving birth to a different kind of European order. That is, it appears to be driving structural shifts in the way Europe is run and organised that...

Mortgage prisoners: regulatory changes and low credit scores have left thousands trapped in a cycle of high payments

There are 8.5 million households in the UK who own a home with a residential mortgage, often with fixed interest rates from two to five years. Usually, when that mortgage deal ends, the borrower will move to another deal...

Politics

Why is the government proposing caps on international students and how did we get here?

The federal government is due to introduce legislation on Thursday to enable new caps on the number of international student places at educational institutions in Australia. These include universities, TAFEs and private...

Britain is not as broken as everyone seems to think

According to many politicians and commentators, the UK is in a very sorry state. Ahead of the general election expected this year, Labour leader Keir Starmer has pledged to fix broken Britain. He has spoken of his vow...

Belief in democracy is on the decline in Africa

Democracy in Africa has not had a good year. Military juntas from Mali to Niger appear to have cemented their grip on power. Sudans democratic dreams were dashed when the countrys two most powerful strongmen opted for war....

Term limits aren’t the answer

Theres no denying that the current Congress has been one of the most chaotic in recent memory. The paralysis in 2023 and 2024 over the selection of the speaker of the House helped lead to one of Congress most unproductive...

An obscure provision of Ohio law could keep Biden off the ballot there in November

President Joe Biden might not appear on the November 2024 presidential ballot in Ohio. Ohio law requires that presidential candidates be certified that is, the state must be notified that presidential candidates have been...

Science

Black holes are mysterious, yet also deceptively simple − a new space mission may help physicists answer hairy questions about these astronomical objects

Physicists consider black holes one of the most mysterious objects that exist. Ironically, theyre also considered one of the simplest. For years, physicists like me have been looking to prove that black holes are more...

Is dark matter’s main rival theory dead? There’s bad news from the Cassini spacecraft and other recent tests

One of the biggest mysteries in astrophysics today is that the forces in galaxies do not seem to add up. Galaxies rotate much faster than predicted by applying Newtons law of gravity to their visible matter, despite those...

Why are algorithms called algorithms? A brief history of the Persian polymath you’ve likely never heard of

Algorithms have become integral to our lives. From social media apps to Netflix, algorithms learn your preferences and prioritise the content you are shown. Google Maps and artificial intelligence are nothing without...

IceCube researchers detect a rare type of energetic neutrino sent from powerful astronomical objects

About a trillion tiny particles called neutrinos pass through you every second. Created during the Big Bang, these relic neutrinos exist throughout the entire universe, but they cant harm you. In fact, only one of them is...

The Mars Sample Return mission has a shaky future, and NASA is calling on private companies for backup

A critical NASA mission in the search for life beyond Earth, Mars Sample Return, is in trouble. Its budget has ballooned from US$5 billion to over $11 billion, and the sample return date may slip from the end of this...

Technology

Aptos Breaks Records with 115.4 Million Transactions in a Single Day

Since the launch of Tapos Cat, a new tap-to-earn game that has quickly acquired popularity, the amount of transactional activity on Aptos has significantly increased. Aptos Shatters Blockchain Transaction Records,...

Spot Ethereum ETF Approval May Boost Bitcoin, Says Michael Saylor

According to MicroStrategy founder Michael Saylor, the incorporation of spot Ether exchange-traded funds (ETFs) provides an additional line of defense for Bitcoin. Michael Saylor Sees Bitcoin Gaining From Ether ETF...

Tesla CEO Elon Musk Flips Stance on China Tariffs: ‘Distort the Market’

Tesla CEO Elon Musk has reversed his stance on China tariffs, criticizing them for distorting the market and advocating for free trade during the Viva Technology Conference. Elon Musk Criticizes Bidens Tariff Program,...

Adidas Originals and 100 Thieves Debut Collaborative Collection Blending Gaming and Fashion

Adidas Originals and 100 Thieves have launched their first collaborative collection, combining gaming culture with fashion innovation. The collection includes garments, footwear, and accessories, featuring the standout...

Samsung to Increase Outsourcing Smartphone Production in China to 25% of 2024 Output

Samsung plans to significantly boost its smartphone production by outsourcing to Chinese manufacturers, increasing output from 44 million to 67 million units. Samsungs Outsourcing Strategy Targets Cost...
  • Market Data
Close

Welcome to EconoTimes

Sign up for daily updates for the most important
stories unfolding in the global economy.