Menu

Search

Featured Post

Give Chaucer a chance! Why ‘dead white men’ can still be relevant in NZ’s classrooms

By Simone Celine Marshall

While the proposed revisions of the English curriculum in secondary schools have unnerved and offended some, there is perhaps one silver lining. In a system seemingly intent on pushing students towards scientific and...

A byelection to watch: What the Toronto-St. Paul’s vote means for Justin Trudeau

By Sam Routley

Residents of the federal riding of Toronto-St. Pauls will soon be tasked with voting for their next Member of Parliament. Under conventional circumstances, this wouldnt be very interesting. The riding, occupying a sizable...

Mealtimes can be tough when your child is autistic or has ADHD. Here are 5 tips to try

By Stella Boyd-Ford Et Al

Gathering as a family for a meal can serve several purposes: from social connection to nutrition. But this can also make eating and mealtimes tricky to manage when someone in the family is neurodivergent. Many autistic...

NZ needs a 300% increase in qualified midwives – and those working need more support and recognition

By James Greenslade-Yeats Et Al

New Zealands understaffed and underfunded midwifery sector is hoping to benefit from increased health funding announced in the 2024 budget. The government has promised NZ$8.15 billion in additional operating capital for...

Respectful canoeing means acknowledging Indigenous authority over the land and water

By Bruce Erickson

In a satirical look at canoeing in Canada, Ojibway comedian and author Drew Hayden Taylor once joked every time a non-native person whitewater canoes down the Madawaska River, or goes kayaking off Tobermory, they should...

Another election, another round of Nigel Farage hype, with no lessons learned

By Aurelien Mondon

Nigel Farage, a man who has never been elected to the House of Commons despite years of trying, has again been allowed to set the agenda in the UK. Ten years after Ukip won the European parliament elections, throwing...

Did the Victorians have better roads than us? A history of Britain’s potholed streets

By Lauren Colley

Potholes are the motorists ultimate bug bear, responsible for an estimated 474 million worth of damage in the UK last year. As insurance companies wade through a further 30% average increase in compensation claims, have...

How Vladimir Putin projects his image as a modern-day Peter the Great

By George Gilbert

Russian energy giant Gazprom is reported to have been hit particularly hard by sanctions imposed as a result of the war with Ukraine. An internal report obtained and published by the Financial Times has forecast that the...

Election 2024: migrants aren’t to blame for Britain’s housing crisis

By Regina Serpa

Migration has become the most toxic issue in British politics, driving intensely emotional debates that are often based on prejudice and misunderstanding. Similarly emotional is housing a finite resource in high demand at...

Scary-sounding new virus in the news? Here are the questions you should ask

By Ed Hutchinson

In the US, a dairy-farm worker develops itching, blood-shot eyes. In Australia, a young girl falls ill after a foreign holiday and is rushed to hospital. In Mexico, another man, already ill and bed-bound, becomes seriously...

The world no longer needs fossil fuels – and the UK could lead the way in making them taboo

By Greg Muttitt Et Al

North Sea oil and gas has become a battleground issue in the UK general election. The Labour partys manifesto promises an end to issuing new licenses for finding oil and gas. The Conservative party meanwhile proposes a...

Myth: How the US manipulates global markets for economic supremacy

By Jostein Hauge

US president, Joe Biden, raised tariffs on Chinese-made goods sharply in May, claiming that the Chinese government has cheated by pouring money into Chinese companies … hurting competitors who play by the rules. The...

Canadians are feeling increasingly powerless amid economic struggles and rising inequality

By Scott Schieman1 Et Al

If you feel like youre being pushed around in life, youre not alone. Our recent research has found that Canadians are increasingly feeling a sense of powerlessness in their lives. This sentiment has been steadily...

AI can make African elections more efficient – but trust must be built and proper rules put in place

By Shamira Ahmed Et Al

Time magazine has dubbed 2024 a super election year. An astonishing 4 billion people are eligible to vote in countries across the world this year. Many are on the African continent, where presidential, parliamentary and...

Romantic breakups can spark severe trauma in young people – new study

By Alberta SJ van der Watt

What should I study? What do I want to be? How will I pay for my education? Who do I want to spend the rest of my life with? These are the life-changing decisions many young people face. Emerging adulthood (between the...

Mauritius’ next growth phase: a new plan is needed as the tax haven era fades

By Pritish Behuria

Mauritians will head to the polls by November 2024 and politicians are considering the economic direction of the island country. For the last two decades, the countrys economic growth has depended heavily on its...

Elder fraud has reached epidemic proportions – a geriatrician explains what older Americans need to know

By Laurie Archbald-Pannone

Americans age 60 and older lost more than US$3 billion to scammers in 2023, according to the FBI. To put that whopping figure in context, Taylor Swifts Eras Tour recently made news as the first concert tour ever to earn...

Modern surgery began with saws and iron hands – how amputation transformed the body in the Renaissance

By Heidi Hausse

The human body today has many replaceable parts, ranging from artificial hearts to myoelectric feet. What makes this possible is not just complicated technology and delicate surgical procedures. Its also an idea that...

The Hubble telescope has shifted into one-gyro mode after months of technical issues − an aerospace engineering expert explains

By Panagiotis Tsiotras

Imagine keeping a laser beam trained on a dime thats 200 miles away. Now imagine doing that continuously for 24 hours, while riding a merry-go-round. Seem difficult? Well, thats basically what the Hubble Space Telescope...

Modern-day outlaws, ‘sovereign citizens’ threaten the rule of law

By Christine Sarteschi

In May 2024, an Oklahoma man was arrested and charged with kidnapping and murdering two women, becoming the fifth member of an anti-government group called Gods Misfits to face such charges. With the investigation still...

Sunday school – Monday through Friday: Oklahoma joins states with ‘release time’ laws letting K-12 kids leave school for religious lessons

By Charles J. Russo

Children in American public schools traditionally learned the three Rs: reading, writing and arithmetic. Today, students in more than half of the U.S. states can study a fourth R: religion. Oklahoma is the most recent...

Business basics: how do companies pay tax?

By Toni Patricia Brackin

This article is part of The Conversations Business Basics series where we ask leading experts to discuss key concepts in business, economics and finance. A company is a business that is established as a separate legal...

Known unknowns: controversy over CSIRO’s electricity report reveals an uncomfortable truth

By Bruce Mountain

CSIROs latest annual GenCost update, released last month, was billed as Australias most comprehensive electricity generation cost report. GenCost has proven to be highly controversial. Opposition Leader Peter Dutton...

Inflation is cooling, but not fast enough for the Fed

By Christopher Decker

It was a double-whammy Wednesday for economic-data enthusiasts. During the morning of June 12, 2024, the Bureau of Labor Statistics published its latest inflation figures. The news was relatively good, showing that...

Global demand for oil could peak soon

By Jen Purdie

This weeks announcement of the governments plans to reopen New Zealands territorial waters to oil drilling comes as no surprise. All three coalition parties campaigned on reversing the 2018 ban on offshore oil...

With Russia not attending, what can this weekend’s Ukraine peace summit achieve?

By Jon Richardson

The Summit on Peace in Ukraine, hosted by Switzerland this weekend, is not a peace conference in the usual sense. Russia, which has dismissed it as irrelevant, wont participate. And any summit aimed at ending the war cant...

The secrets of Maya child sacrifice at Chichén Itzá uncovered using ancient DNA

By Adam "Ben" Rohrlach Et Al

After analysing the remains of 64 ancient sacrificed individuals, most of whom were children, researchers have revealed new details about human sacrifice at the ancient Maya site of Chichén Itzá. Published...

In some parts of Australia, local roads are falling apart. Here’s an easy federal fix

By Dominic Jones Et Al

There are local councils in Australia that cant afford to fix their roads, part of the problem is simply that they arent in Australias biggest states. The problem arises from the archaic way grants to councils are...

An ounce of prevention: Now is the time to take action on H5N1 avian flu, because the stakes are enormous

By Matthew Miller

Bird flu poses a massive threat, and the potential for a catastrophic new pandemic is imminent. We still have a chance to stop a possible humanitarian disaster, but only if we get to work urgently, carefully and...

Malawi farming experiment shows how simple changes can boost maize yields and improve soil

By Alan Dixon

Malawis increasingly unpredictable rainfall and higher than usual temperatures are causing problems for smallholder farmers. Soil erosion has increased, causing soil fertility and water availability to decline. Crops often...

South Africa’s biggest arts festival turns 50 – we assess its impact

By Jen Snowball

The National Arts Festival was established in 1974 in Grahamstown (now Makhanda) in South Africas Eastern Cape province. Each year, in winter, the rural town transforms into a hive of theatres, galleries, markets and...

Sudan food emergency: local researcher unpacks scale of the disaster and what action is needed

By Oliver Kiptoo Kirui

The UN recently warned of the risk of famine in Sudan. The war between the army and the paramilitary Rapid Support Forces has killed civilians and devastated livelihoods on a massive scale. Around 18 million people are...

Microrobots made of algae carry chemo directly to lung tumors, improving cancer treatment

By Zhengxing Li

Tumors that travel to the lungs, or lung metastases, pose a formidable challenge in the realm of cancer treatment. Conventional chemotherapy often falls short because its inefficient. It doesnt directly target the lungs...

China’s war games near Taiwan threaten international peace and security

By Kuan-Wei Chen

Taiwan recently saw yet another peaceful transition of power with the inauguration of President Lai Ching-Te, who was elected to office in January. In his inaugural speech, Lai called on neighbouring China to cease its...

Canada must make communication more inclusive for deaf people

By Paula Bath

I am a hearing person married to a deaf person. In 2015, I remember going to the midwife clinic for our first babys appointment. We arranged for our own sign language interpreter because we knew there would be...

How the health of honeybee hives can inform environmental policies in Canadian cities

By Mischa Young Et Al

In recent years, there has been a notable surge in Canada and around the world in the popularity of urban beekeeping. Driven by a heightened awareness of the vital role of pollinators and the practices increasing...

Bridgerton: tips on how to dress and hold yourself in London society straight from the Regency period

By Lisa Smith

As viewers of Bridgerton know, finding the right suitor is an art, requiring charm and beauty. It helped to be a diamond (the most eligible woman of the season, as chosen by the Queen), but all young ladies benefited from...

Mexico: why Sheinbaum’s historic election may not translate to gender equality

By Jennifer Castañeda-Navarrete

Claudia Sheinbaum has made history. On June 2, she became the first woman to be elected as president of Mexico. Nearly 36 million Mexicans cast their votes for Sheinbaum, more than double the number received by her closest...

Fossil fuel ads work on you too – here’s how

By Jack Marley

If countries cannot keep fossil fuels in the ground then they should at least keep their ads off the air. Godfathers of climate chaos in the coal, oil and gas industries have used slick advertising campaigns (not to...

How secure are banking apps?

By Ismini Vasileiou

These days, banking apps have become integral to financial transactions. As a result banks are finding that ensuring the security of their apps is more critical than ever. Cybercriminals have evolved and so financial...

No commercial incentive to develop gene therapy – hospitals will try to fill the gap

By Claire Booth

Individually, rare diseases are rare, but there are so many rare diseases that over 400 million people are affected worldwide. Together, rare diseases arent so rare. Only 5% of rare diseases have an approved treatment...

Four tips to avoid being bamboozled by political statistics and data

By Renaud Foucart

With a plethora of elections around the world in 2024, voters considering their options can expect to be presented with all kinds of numbers and statistics aimed at giving credibility to various claims from various...

African swine fever: are there better ways to manage the disease than Italy’s mass pig culls?

By Frédéric Keck

Prime Minister Giorgia Melonis attacks on Italys cultural heritage from libel suits against intellectuals to her governments censorship of texts critical of Mussolini have made headlines across Europe. Less attention,...

Mental health services are scarce in Nigeria but there’s a huge need: what we learnt from callers to a hotline

By Aloysius Odii Et Al

Emergency hotlines have a crucial role to play in improving access to mental health services, particularly in countries where these services are in short supply. This is the case in Nigeria, where in one study one in...

Columbia Law Review article critical of Israel sparks battle between student editors and their board − highlighting fragility of academic freedom

By Neal H. Hutchens

Editors of Columbia Law Review, a prominent journal run by students from the prestigious universitys law school, say the publications board of directors urged them on June 2, 2024, to refrain from publishing an article...

Politics is still both local and personal – but only for independents, not for Democrats or Republicans

By Shanna Pearson-Merkowitz Et Al

Independent voters who live in communities with lots of gun violence are very concerned about gun safety and gun regulations, our research has found. That should not be surprising. But what is surprising is our...

Paris 2024 Olympics to debut high-level breakdancing – and physics in action

By Amy Pope

Two athletes square off for an intense dance battle. The DJ starts spinning tunes, and the athletes begin twisting, spinning and seemingly defying gravity, respectfully watching each other and taking turns showing off...

Ontario expanding alcohol to convenience stores is a covert union avoidance strategy

By Steven Tufts

The Ontario government has announced its expediting its plan to get beer into thousands of convenience stores. The announcement received immediate backlash, primarily against the $225 million given to the Beer Store to...

Climate holdout Japan drove Australia’s LNG boom. Could the partnership go green?

By Wesley Morgan

Without funding from Japan, many of Australias gas projects wouldnt have gone ahead. Massive public loans from Japanese taxpayers are propping up Australias now-enormous fossil gas industry. Japan is also becoming a major...

Trust hits new low: 45% of people think politicians put party before country

By John Curtice

There is an air of deja vu about this election. Trust and confidence in how Britain is governed is as low as it has ever been just as it was shortly before the last election five years ago. Yet the circumstances that...

Space arms race may be underway

As conflict rages on Earth, an arms race may be underway in outer space. On May 30, a US diplomat warned that Russia had launched a weapon into orbit, something Russias deputy foreign minister, Sergey Ryabkov, branded as...

Digital Currency Revolution

TokenPost Heats Up 'Crypto Fever' with Global Web3 Roadshow 'IXO™ 2024: Embrace the Future'

03:56 AM| Business

SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA TokenPost, South Koreas premier blockchain media outlet, is gearing up to launch the second phase of its global Web3 roadshow, IXO 2024: Embrace the Future. Scheduled for July 9 and 10, from 10:00 AM...

South Australia’s plan to ban political donations raises big risks as well as benefits

By Anne Twomey - 04:32 AM| Politics

The South Australian government has proposed banning political donations because of the risk and the perception that they buy undue influence and fuel corruption. Premier Peter Malinauskas said the aim was to give South...

Top Stories

Cancer is affecting more young people than ever before: How health care can learn to meet their needs

By Cheryl Heykoop - 04:31 AM| Health

The Princess of Wales cancer diagnosis at the relatively young age of 42 brought attention to the realities of being diagnosed with cancer as a younger person. By definition, adolescents and young adults (AYAs) are people...

What you should know before you start chasing bargains at the EOFY sales

By Park Thaichon - 04:32 AM| Business

What cost-of-living crisis? Millions of Australians are expected to spend A$10.1 billion during the end of financial year (EOFY) sales. Many products, from cars and holiday packages to clothing and white goods will be...

Big batteries are solving a longstanding problem with solar power in California. Can they do the same for Australia?

By Asma Aziz - 04:33 AM| Business Technology

When you graph electricity demand in power grids with lots of solar panels, it looks a bit like a duck, with high points in the morning and evening (when people are relying on the grid) and a big dip in the middle of the...

Some of Earth’s most ancient lifeforms can live on hydrogen – and we can learn from their chemical powers

By Pok Man Leung Et Al - 04:33 AM| Science

Three-quarters of all matter in the universe is made up of hydrogen. The young Earth was also rich in hydrogen, thanks to fierce geological and volcanic activity. Just as stars burn hydrogen to produce heat and light...

Space Science Series

Nations realise they need to take risks or lose the race to the Moon

By Jacco van Loon - 04:34 AM| Science

The Nasa-led Artemis-3 mission will place the first human boots on the surface of the Moon since Apollo 17s Gene Cernan and Harrison Schmitt left the lunar surface in December 1972. The goal of the Artemis programme is...

Social Media Revolution Series

TikTok star Munya Chawawa takes on North Korea in new documentary

By Sarah A. Son - 04:53 AM| Insights & Views

Munya Chawawa, who is best known for his satirical comedy sketches aimed at educating and entertaining a Gen Z audience, has made a new documentary about Kim Jong-uns North Korea. How to Survive a Dictator premiered at...

Three ways politicians always promise to raise money without increasing taxes – and why they rarely deliver

By Steve Schifferes - 05:26 AM| Insights & Views Politics

After weeks of controversy over Labour and Conservative costings in which each side accused the other of dishonesty the manifestos show that both parties had wildly exaggerated their rivals plans. But there has been...

Econotimes Series

Economy

Investors have bid against each other to buy Australia’s first green bond. Here’s why that’s a great sign

You might think government debt is bad, but it actually plays a crucial role in modern finance. Back when he was treasurer, Peter Costello famously declared that April 21 2006 would be known as Australias Debt Free Day....

Meet the ‘new consumer’: How shopper behaviour is changing in a post-inflation world

After a long anticipated wait, the Bank of Canada has finally decided to cut interest rates by 25 basis points. The decision marks a departure from the series of interest rate hikes that were previously implemented to curb...

Yes, carbon capture and storage is controversial – but it’s going to be crucial

Renewable energy sources such as wind and solar are vital tools to help us make cuts to the 36 billion tonnes of greenhouse gases we emit each year. But renewables alone cant get us to net zero. Sectors such as cement,...

The UK’s nature restoration plans have some big holes – here’s how to fill them

Have you heard anything about nature as a political priority in the upcoming UK general election? We havent. And as biodiversity researchers, that troubles us. The UK is already one of the worlds most nature-depleted...

Rotting sargassum is choking the Caribbean’s white sand beaches, fueling an economic and public health crisis

The Caribbeans sandy beaches, clear turquoise water and vibrant coral reefs filled with an amazing variety of sea creatures have long been the pride of the islands. The big three sun, sea and sand have made this...

Politics

Trump's 'Huge Fan' Status of Tesla Cybertruck Fuels Growing Alliance with Elon Musk

Elon Musk, during Teslas shareholder meeting, disclosed his growing alliance with Donald Trump, emphasizing Trumps admiration for the Cybertruck. CEO Elon Musk spoke about his relationship with former President Trump...

Why spending time and money creating TikToks probably won’t pay off for Labour and Conservatives

In a few short years, TikTok has moved from being an app for teens doing dance routines in their bedroom to a key part of political campaigning. Both Labour and the Conservatives are on the app (with 191,000 and 58,000...

2024 European elections: Who are young Europeans voting for?

Over the last five European Parliament elections, young peoples participation and preferences have changed significantly in response to various socio-economic, political and cultural factors. Of course, the European Union...

EU elections: far-right parties surge, but less than had been expected

The results of the 2024 European elections have confirmed the surge of far-right parties in EU member states. However, while many recorded significant scores, the wave was not a groundswell, and the shifts vary from...

Does voting help the climate?

The worlds biggest election took place in heat so severe it claimed the lives of several poll workers. Nearly one billion people were eligible to vote in the election that returned Narendra Modi to power in India, but...

Science

Eye exercises to improve sight – is there any science behind them? An ophthalmologist explains why you shouldn’t buy the hype

You may have seen advertisements claiming to eliminate the need for eyeglasses through vision therapy or vision training basically, eye exercises. These exercises include putting pressure on or palming the eye; eye...

The universe’s biggest explosions made some of the elements we are composed of. But there’s another mystery source out there

After its birth in the Big Bang, the universe consisted mainly of hydrogen and a few helium atoms. These are the lightest elements in the periodic table. More-or-less all elements heavier than helium were produced in the...

Engineering cells to broadcast their behavior can help scientists study their inner workings

Waves are ubiquitous in nature and technology. Whether its the rise and fall of ocean tides or the swinging of a clocks pendulum, the predictable rhythms of waves create a signal that is easy to track and distinguish from...

If an asteroid hit Earth and all the humans died, would the dinosaurs come back?

Many, many years ago dinosaurs roamed the Earth. Six-year-old Aga knows that a meteorite wiped them out… but could another meteorite bring them back? You can read a print version of this story...

Ancient DNA from an extinct native duck reveals how far birds flew to make New Zealand home

Ask a bird lover if they have heard of the extinct giant moa or its ancient predator, Haasts eagle, and the answer will likely be yes. The same cant be said of New Zealands extinct, but equally unique, mergansers a group...

Technology

Shytoshi Kusama Reaches Major Milestone on X, Delighting the SHIB Army

The mysterious leader of the SHIB programming team, who goes by the name Shytoshi Kusama, has made a huge accomplishment. This accomplishment was accomplished by the SHIB programming team. The social media behemoth X was...

Ethereum's Path to $10K is the Most Asymmetric Bet in Crypto, Analyst Says

Although Ether is still having trouble breaking through the $4,000 barrier, reaching $10,000 would result in a 194% price gain from where it is currently trading. According to a well-known analyst, the possibility of...

Shiba Inu (SHIB) Partners With British Red Cross to Boost Crypto Donations

Shiba Inu (SHIB) gains support from the British Red Cross, enabling crypto donations through the Giving Block. This partnership enhances SHIBs value and broadens the Red Crosss fundraising capabilities, marking a...

Kia's $30,000 EV3 Built in Mexico to Qualify for US EV Tax Credit

Kia to build the $30,000 EV3 in Mexico, unlocking the US EV tax credit. The EV3s affordability and advanced features are set to make a significant impact on the electric vehicle market. Kia Unveils $30,700 EV3 at 2023...

Tesla Cybertruck Owner Showcases Electric Cooler, Full Owner's Manual Revealed Online

A Tesla Cybertruck owner highlights an electric cooler run by the trucks bed outlet, demonstrating its utility. Additionally, the Tesla Cybertruck owners manual has been revealed, providing comprehensive specifications and...
  • Market Data
Close

Welcome to EconoTimes

Sign up for daily updates for the most important
stories unfolding in the global economy.