Menu

Search

Quentin Hanich

Quentin Hanich

Associate Professor, University of Wollongong

Quentin Hanich leads the Fisheries Governance Research Program at the Australian National Centre for Ocean Resources and Security (ANCORS), University of Wollongong and consults for various international organisations and national governments on fisheries governance and marine conservation in the Pacific islands region. He has a strong research and consulting background, and a substantial track record in winning research grants and tenders for commercial research projects. He has extensive project management experience in fisheries governance, marine conservation, and fisheries management and development, and has worked widely throughout the Asia Pacific region. He is recognized as a regional expert on international fisheries governance and development, and more broadly on various aspects of oceans governance and marine conservation.

In addition to his research and project activities, he has chaired international working groups at treaty meetings, facilitated inter-governmental workshops, advised Ministerial meetings and national delegations, and is a member of the Pacific Marine Sector Working Group and the IUCN World Commission on Protected Areas. He also lectures and writes on oceans governance, international fisheries, marine conservation, and fisheries development in the Asia Pacific region.

Squid fishing grew by 68% in just three years, raising fears the industry is out of control

Mar 13, 2023 11:43 am UTC| Business

Global squid fishing increased by 68% between 2017 and 2020, according to our international analysis, prompting concerns that much of the international fishing fleet is sidestepping necessary conservation and...

Blockchain Revolution Series

How blockchain is strengthening tuna traceability to combat illegal fishing

Jan 22, 2018 10:40 am UTC| Insights & Views Technology

In a significant development for global fisheries, blockchain technology is now being used to improve tuna traceability to help stop illegal and unsustainable fishing practices in the Pacific Islands tuna industry. The...

1 

Economy

Investors have bid against each other to buy Australia’s first green bond. Here’s why that’s a great sign

You might think government debt is bad, but it actually plays a crucial role in modern finance. Back when he was treasurer, Peter Costello famously declared that April 21 2006 would be known as Australias Debt Free Day....

Meet the ‘new consumer’: How shopper behaviour is changing in a post-inflation world

After a long anticipated wait, the Bank of Canada has finally decided to cut interest rates by 25 basis points. The decision marks a departure from the series of interest rate hikes that were previously implemented to curb...

Yes, carbon capture and storage is controversial – but it’s going to be crucial

Renewable energy sources such as wind and solar are vital tools to help us make cuts to the 36 billion tonnes of greenhouse gases we emit each year. But renewables alone cant get us to net zero. Sectors such as cement,...

The UK’s nature restoration plans have some big holes – here’s how to fill them

Have you heard anything about nature as a political priority in the upcoming UK general election? We havent. And as biodiversity researchers, that troubles us. The UK is already one of the worlds most nature-depleted...

Rotting sargassum is choking the Caribbean’s white sand beaches, fueling an economic and public health crisis

The Caribbeans sandy beaches, clear turquoise water and vibrant coral reefs filled with an amazing variety of sea creatures have long been the pride of the islands. The big three sun, sea and sand have made this...

Politics

Why spending time and money creating TikToks probably won’t pay off for Labour and Conservatives

In a few short years, TikTok has moved from being an app for teens doing dance routines in their bedroom to a key part of political campaigning. Both Labour and the Conservatives are on the app (with 191,000 and 58,000...

2024 European elections: Who are young Europeans voting for?

Over the last five European Parliament elections, young peoples participation and preferences have changed significantly in response to various socio-economic, political and cultural factors. Of course, the European Union...

EU elections: far-right parties surge, but less than had been expected

The results of the 2024 European elections have confirmed the surge of far-right parties in EU member states. However, while many recorded significant scores, the wave was not a groundswell, and the shifts vary from...

Does voting help the climate?

The worlds biggest election took place in heat so severe it claimed the lives of several poll workers. Nearly one billion people were eligible to vote in the election that returned Narendra Modi to power in India, but...

Science

Eye exercises to improve sight – is there any science behind them? An ophthalmologist explains why you shouldn’t buy the hype

You may have seen advertisements claiming to eliminate the need for eyeglasses through vision therapy or vision training basically, eye exercises. These exercises include putting pressure on or palming the eye; eye...

The universe’s biggest explosions made some of the elements we are composed of. But there’s another mystery source out there

After its birth in the Big Bang, the universe consisted mainly of hydrogen and a few helium atoms. These are the lightest elements in the periodic table. More-or-less all elements heavier than helium were produced in the...

Engineering cells to broadcast their behavior can help scientists study their inner workings

Waves are ubiquitous in nature and technology. Whether its the rise and fall of ocean tides or the swinging of a clocks pendulum, the predictable rhythms of waves create a signal that is easy to track and distinguish from...

If an asteroid hit Earth and all the humans died, would the dinosaurs come back?

Many, many years ago dinosaurs roamed the Earth. Six-year-old Aga knows that a meteorite wiped them out… but could another meteorite bring them back? You can read a print version of this story...

Ancient DNA from an extinct native duck reveals how far birds flew to make New Zealand home

Ask a bird lover if they have heard of the extinct giant moa or its ancient predator, Haasts eagle, and the answer will likely be yes. The same cant be said of New Zealands extinct, but equally unique, mergansers a group...

Technology

Ethereum's Path to $10K is the Most Asymmetric Bet in Crypto, Analyst Says

Although Ether is still having trouble breaking through the $4,000 barrier, reaching $10,000 would result in a 194% price gain from where it is currently trading. According to a well-known analyst, the possibility of...

Shiba Inu (SHIB) Partners With British Red Cross to Boost Crypto Donations

Shiba Inu (SHIB) gains support from the British Red Cross, enabling crypto donations through the Giving Block. This partnership enhances SHIBs value and broadens the Red Crosss fundraising capabilities, marking a...

Kia's $30,000 EV3 Built in Mexico to Qualify for US EV Tax Credit

Kia to build the $30,000 EV3 in Mexico, unlocking the US EV tax credit. The EV3s affordability and advanced features are set to make a significant impact on the electric vehicle market. Kia Unveils $30,700 EV3 at 2023...

Tesla Cybertruck Owner Showcases Electric Cooler, Full Owner's Manual Revealed Online

A Tesla Cybertruck owner highlights an electric cooler run by the trucks bed outlet, demonstrating its utility. Additionally, the Tesla Cybertruck owners manual has been revealed, providing comprehensive specifications and...
  • Market Data
Close

Welcome to EconoTimes

Sign up for daily updates for the most important
stories unfolding in the global economy.