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Mashupye Herbert Maserumule

Professor of Public Affairs, Tshwane University of Technology

With twenty(20) years of teaching experience in different universities in South Africa, Maserumule is an experienced researcher. His areas of research interest include, among others, the Historiography, Ontology and Epistemology of Public Administration, Developmental State, Politics of Transition, Pan-African Thought and Philosophy of Governance.

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Mathieu Gautier

chercheur en génomique statistique et évolutive des populations, INRA

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Matt King

I am Professor of Polar Geodesy and ARC Future Fellow at the University of Tasmania. My field of expertise is geodetic observation of Earth deformation and the global water cycle, including ice-sheet mass balance and sea-level change and particularly using the Global Positioning System (GPS) and the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE). I also work on reduction of systematic and random errors in these techniques in order to maximise the information content in the data and improve the reliability of the interpretations. I have authored more than 80 peer-reviewed publications including several articles in the leading scientific journals Science, Nature, Nature Geoscience, Nature Climate Change and Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. In 2015 I was awarded the Royal Society (London) Kavli Medal and Lecture (see the lecture at https://royalsociety.org/events/2015/04/continental-loss).

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Matt Kranke

My doctoral research project studies the collaboration between the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the World Bank from an ideational perspective. I seek to explain why, in marked contrast to parallel developments in the global political economy, the IMF and the World Bank opted to partly deinstitutionalise their collaboration after the global financial crisis.

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Matt McDonald

Formerly lecturer in politics and international studies at the University of New South Wales, University of Birmingham (UK) and University of Warwick (UK)

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Matthew Ashton

I'm a lecturer in politics and the media at Nottingham Trent University. I did my BA degree in politics at NTU before taking a Masters in Politics and Contemporary History at Nottingham. I returned to NTU to do a Phd on the German part system passing my viva in 2009.

My current research interests lie in the area of the British and American political and media system.

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Matthew Beard

Adjunct Lecturer, UNSW Australia

Dr. Matthew Beard is an ethicist and moral philosopher. He is currently the Writer and Content Producer at The Ethics Centre, an independent, not-for-profit organisation focused on the promotion and exploration of ethical questions.He is also an Adjunct Lecturer at UNSW Canberra's School of Humanities and Social Sciences.

Matthew was awarded his PhD from the University of Notre Dame Australia for a thesis entitled ‘War Rights and Military Virtues: A Philosophical Reappraisal of Just War Theory,’ and was the inaugural recipient of the Morris Research Scholarship from Notre Dame. He has discussed subjects including military ethics, moral injury and PTSD, cyberwar, torture, and medical ethics amongst others in book chapters, scholarly articles, radio interviews, public opinion pieces, and at academic conferences both domestically and internationally.

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Matthew Carmona

Matthew Carmona is Professor of Planning and Urban Design at the Bartlett School of Planning, UCL. He has previously lectured at the University of Nottingham and before that worked as a researcher at Strathclyde and Reading Universities and as an architect in practice.
His research has focused on the policy context for delivering better quality built and natural environments, having worked on a range of research projects examining:

design policies and guidance
design coding
residential design and development processes
delivering urban renaissance
the value of urban and architectural design
the working relationships between housing providers and planners
measuring quality in planning
managing external public space
local environmental quality and standard
London squares and high streets
governance of design, the case of CABE

Matthew is on the editorial board of ‘Urban Design Quarterly’, is European Associate Editor for the ‘Journal of Urban Design’, and edits the ‘Design in the Built Environment’ book series for Ashgate. He is a regular advisor to government and government agencies both in the UK and overseas and writes a column for Town & Country Planning, the journal of the Town & Country Planning Association. He is a Design Council CABE Built Environment Expert.
Between 2003 and 2011 Matthew Carmona served as Head of the Bartlett School of Planning.

His book "Capital Spaces: The Multiple Complex Public Spaces of a Global City" is published by Routledge: http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415527095

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Matthew Freeman

Senior Lecturer in Media and Communication, Bath Spa University

Dr Matthew Freeman is Senior Lecturer in Media and Communication at Bath Spa University, where he is also Director of the Media Convergence Research Centre. He completed his PhD in Culture, Film and Media at the University of Nottingham and holds an MA and a BA (Hons) in Film and Television Studies, both from the University of Warwick. Before taking up his post at Bath Spa University in 2015, he taught at the University of Nottingham and in the School of Media at Birmingham City University.

His research concentrates on cultures of production across the borders of media and history, writing extensively on the industrial history of transmedia storytelling. He has also published on such topics as media branding, convergence cultures, and methodological approaches to media industry studies.

Matthew is the author of Historicizing Transmedia Storytelling: Early Twentieth-Century Transmedia Story Worlds (Routledge, 2017), Industrial Approaches to Media: A Methodological Gateway to Industry Studies (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016), and the co-author (with Carlos A. Scolari and Paolo Bertetti) of Transmedia Archaeology: Storytelling in the Borderlines of Science Fiction, Comics and Pulp Magazines (Palgrave Pivot, 2014). His research can also be found in journals such as The International Journal of Cultural Studies, Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television, and International Journal of Communication.

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Matthew Kirschenbaum

Professor of English, University of Maryland

Matthew G. Kirschenbaum is Professor in the Department of English at the University of Maryland and Director of the Graduate Certificate in Digital Studies. He is also an affiliated faculty member with the College of Information Studies at Maryland, and a member of the teaching faculty at the University of Virginia’s Rare Book School. He served previously as an Associate Director of the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH) for over a decade. He is a 2011 Guggenheim Fellow.

His most recent book, Track Changes: A Literary History of Word Processing, was published by Harvard University Press’s Belknap Press in 2016; with Pat Harrigan, he also co-edited the collection Zones of Control: Perspectives on Wargaming from the MIT Press (2016). His public-facing writing has appeared in the Chronicle of Higher Education, Slate, LA Review of Books, Paris Review Daily, War on the Rocks, and The Conversation. His research has been covered by the New York Times, The Atlantic, The New Republic, The Guardian, National Public Radio, Boing Boing, and WIRED, among many other outlets. In 2016 he delivered the A.S.W. Rosenbach Lectures in Bibliography, a written version of which are under contract to the University of Pennsylvania Press as Bitstreams: The Future of Digital Literary Heritage.

Kirschenbaum’s current interests include the history of writing and authorship, textual and bibliographical studies, serious games, and military media and technologies. His first book, Mechanisms: New Media and the Forensic Imagination (MIT Press, 2008) won multiple prizes, including the 16th annual Prize for a First Book from the Modern Language Association. He was also the lead author on the Council on Library and Information Resources report Digital Forensics and Born-Digital Content for Cultural Heritage Collections (2010), recognized with a commendation from the Society of American Archivists. See mkirschenbaum.net or follow him on Twitter as @mkirschenbaum for more.

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Matthew Kofi Ocran

Appointed as an associate professor of economics in 2012, and a professor of economics in 2014. Joined UWC in April 2015 from NMMU. NRF Rated as an established researcher in 2012 for the 6-year cycle, 2012-2018.

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Matthew Raj

Assistant Professor, Faculty of Law, Bond University

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Matthew Sharpe

Matt Sharpe teaches philosophy at Deakin. He works on classical philosophy, rhetoric, and the history of ideas.

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Matthew Wood

Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of Sheffield

Matt Wood is a postdoctoral research associate at the Department of Politics and Deputy Director of the Sir Bernard Crick Centre for the Public Understanding of Politics.

He has previously worked in local journalism and lobbying, and has held visiting fellowship positions at the UK Cabinet Office and ANZSOG Institute for Governance, Unviersity of Canberra.

Matt's research interests are diverse, but centre mainly upon understanding the problem of 'anti-politics' as a societal trend of disaffection, disengagement, and anger with liberal democratic politics in western states.

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Matthias Scheutz

Education
M.A., Philosophy, University of Vienna
M.S., Formal Logic, University of Vienna
M.Sc.E., Computer Engineering, Vienna University of Technology
Ph.D., Philosophy, University of Vienna
M.A., Computer Science, Indiana University
Ph.D., Jointly Cognitive and Computer Science, Indiana University

Research
Artificial Intelligence
Artificial Life
Cognitive Modeling
Complex Systems
Foundations of Cognitive Science
Human-Robot Interaction
Multi-scale Agent-based Models
Natural Language Processing

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Maurizio Meloni

I am a social theorist working on the historical, conceptual, and political implications of the life sciences. I have held two EU Marie Curie Fellowships, a Fulbright scholarship, and an Annual Membership (2014–2015) at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, USA. I am the author of Political Biology: Science and Social Value in Human Heredity from Eugenics to Epigenetics (Palgrave, 2016)

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Mechele Dickerson

A. Mechele Dickerson is a law professor at the University of Texas at Austin. She holds the Arthur L. Moller Chair in Bankruptcy Law and Practice at the University of Texas School of Law. Before she joined the law faculty at UT Law, she was a member of the faculty at William & Mary Law School.

She is the author of “Homeownership and America's Financial Underclass: Flawed Premises, Broken Promises, New Prescriptions.”

Professor Dickerson teaches classes on consumer law, debt and spending to law and undergraduate students and is a nationally recognized expert on consumer debt and bankruptcy law. Dickerson's current research explores the causes and consequences of consumer debt and examines how the culture of debt and consumption in this country has been perceived, and has shifted, over time.

Professor Dickerson received both her B.A. and J.D. from Harvard University.

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Melanie Walker

Professor Melanie Walker is a graduate of the University of KwaZulu-Natal and the University of Cape Town, where she completed her PhD after teaching at disadvantaged secondary schools for a number of years. She joined the University of the Free State in February 2012 as Senior Research Professor of Higher Education and Human Development. In 2013 she was appointed as NRF Chair in Higher Education and Human Development. She is an Al-rated NRF reseascher.

Before joining the UFS, she was Professor of Higher Education at the University of Nottingham in the UK where she was Director of the PhD in Higher Education, Director of Postgraduate Students and a Director of Research in the Faculty of Social Sciences. She retains her link to Nottingham as an Honorary Professor. Professor Walker is also Vice President of the Human Development and Capability Association (2014-2017) and a fellow of ASSAF. She has delivered numerous international keynotes and seminars, written more than 140 book chapters and refereed journal articles, and authored or edited 13 books, including two highly regarded volumes on doctoral education. Her two most recent books focus on higher education and human development, as well as educating ‘public-good professionals.

Her extensive editorial experience has included editing roles on Teaching in Higher Education, Educational Action Research, and the Journal of Human Development and Capabilities. In addition, she currently holds editorial board memberships on the Journal of Human Development and Capabilities, Journal of Professional Development, and Power and Education, undertakes refereeing for a number of international journals and book publishers, and referees proposals for various research councils.

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Melissa J. Ferguson

Melissa J. Ferguson (melissaferguson[at]cornell.edu) is an experimental social psychologist. She received her doctorate in social psychology from New York University in 2002 and then joined the psychology department at Cornell University. Her research focuses on the implicit and non-conscious cognitive processes that enable evaluation, goal-pursuit, self-control, and social behavior. Three recent topics of research in the lab are self-control (what predicts success?), first impressions (how do they form, change, and influence behavior?), and ideology (how do ideological symbols affect us?). Her research has appeared in outlets such as the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Psychological Science, Trends in Cognitive Sciences, Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and her work has been funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health. She is also currently a Public Voices Fellow of The OpEd Project.

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Melody Ding

Senior Research Fellow of Public Health, University of Sydney.

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Melvyn Levitsky

Professor of International Policy and Practice, University of Michigan

Ambassador Melvyn Levitsky, a retired Career Minister in the U.S. Foreign Service, is Professor of International Policy and Practice at the University of Michigan's Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy. He is Senior Fellow of the School's International Policy Center and a member of the University of Michigan's Substance Abuse Research Center (UMSARC) and a Faculty Associate of the University's Center for Russian and East European Studies (CREES) and of the Weiser Center for Emerging Democracies.

Prior to joining the University of Michigan in the fall of 2006, Ambassador Levitsky taught for eight years as Professor of Practice in Public Administration and International Relations at Syracuse University's Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs. He is a Distinguished Fellow of the Maxwell School's Moynihan Institute of Global Affairs. He has also taught as a Professorial Lecturer at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS).

In 2003 Ambassador Levitsky was elected by a vote of the United Nations Economic and Social Council to a seat on the International Narcotics Control Board (INCB), an independent body of experts headquartered in Vienna and responsible for monitoring and promoting standards of drug control established by international treaties. He served on the INCB until 2012.

During his 35-year career as a U.S. diplomat, Ambassador Levitsky was Ambassador to Brazil from 1994-98 and before that held such senior positions as Assistant Secretary of State for International Narcotics Matters, Executive Secretary of the State Department, Ambassador to Bulgaria, Deputy Director of the Voice of America, and Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Human Rights.

Ambassador Levitsky also served as Director of the State Department's Office of UN Political Affairs and as Officer-in-Charge of U.S.-Soviet Bilateral Relations. Earlier in his career he was political officer at the U.S. Embassy in Moscow and a Consul at U.S. Consulates in Belem, Brazil and Frankfurt, Germany.

He has a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Michigan and a Master of Arts degree in Political Science from the University of Iowa.

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Meredith J C Warren

Lecturer in Biblical and Religious Studies, University of Sheffield

Meredith Warren is Lecturer in Biblical and Religious Studies at the University of Sheffield, and is a member of SIIBS, the Sheffield Institute for Interdisciplinary Biblical Studies. She directs the SIIBS research theme, Embodied Religion.

Warren completed her degrees (BA, MA, PhD) at McGill University and from 2013–2015 held a postdoctoral position at the University of Ottawa funded by the Fonds de Recherche du Québec — Société et Culture. She has taught classes on women in early Judaism and Christianity, Koine Greek, ancient Mediterranean religions, and the early church. Meredith’s primary research interests lie in the cultural and theological interactions among the religions of ancient Mediterranean, especially early Judaism and Christianity. In particular, Meredith is interested in how shared cultural understandings of food and eating play a role in ancient narratives, including the Pseudepigrapha, Hellenistic romance novels, and the Gospels.

Meredith’s doctoral work, recently published as My Flesh is Meat Indeed: A Nonsacramental Reading of John 6:51–58 (Fortress 2015), investigates how the Gospel of John makes use of Jewish, Christian, Greek, and Roman attitudes about sacrifice, divinity, and the consumption of human flesh in order to make claims about Jesus’ divinity.

Her current book project, titled Hierophagy: Transformational Eating in Ancient Literature, examines how characters in literature are transformed by eating otherworldly food. An article emerging from this research, “My Heart Poured Forth Understanding: 4 Ezra’s Fiery Cup as Hierophagic Consumption,” was recently published at the journal Studies in Religion.

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Merja Myllylahti

Project manager and author for Journalism, Media and Democracy (JMAD) Research Center, Auckland University of Technology

Merja Myllylahti is a researcher at Auckland University of Technology in New Zealand. Her research interests lie in digital media economy , online news business models and media ownership. She is also a project manager and author at the AUT Center of Journalism, Media and Democracy (JMAD). She is experienced financial journalist and TV reporter having worked 15 years in London for newspapers, TV and online media.

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Michael A. Livermore

Michael A. Livermore joined the faculty as an associate professor of law in 2013. His primary teaching and research interests are in administrative law, computational analysis of legal texts, environmental law, cost-benefit analysis and regulation. He has published numerous books, chapters and articles on these topics, with a special focus on the role of interest groups and public-choice dynamics in shaping the application and methodology of cost-benefit analysis.

Prior to joining the faculty, Livermore spent five years as the founding executive director of the Institute for Policy Integrity at New York University School of Law, a think tank dedicated to improving the quality of government decision-making through advocacy and scholarship in the areas of administrative law, cost-benefit analysis and regulation. During his time there, the institute participated in dozens of regulatory proceedings on a diverse set of issues ranging from climate change to prison safety.

Livermore earned his J.D. magna cum laude from NYU Law, where he was a Furman Scholar, was elected to the Order of the Coif, and served as a managing editor of the Law Review. After law school, he spent a year as a fellow at NYU Law's Center on Environmental and Land Use Law before clerking for Judge Harry T. Edwards on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit.

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Michael Adams

Professor Michael Adams is an internationally recognised specialist in corporate law, corporate governance, securities markets regulation (insider trading and market manipulation) and legal education (especially e-learning). Michael has been writing, teaching and regularly presenting on all these topics for over 25 years. He is a Fellow of the Australian College of Educators (FACE), as well as the Australian Academy of Law (FAAL), and is also a Fellow of the Governance Institute of Australia (FCIS/FGIA-Life). Professor Adams is formerly President of the Australasian Law Teachers Association, the Corporate Law Teachers Association and Chartered Secretaries Australia (now Governance Institute). He is Deputy Chair of the Council of Australian Law Deans (CALD) and a director of the Australian Academy of Law, director of Australian Pro Bono Centre, and the charity, FreedomHub. He is the co-author of ten books and chapters, 50 articles and over 180 conference/seminar presentations. In 2000 he was the recipient of the Australian University Teacher of the year for Law and Legal Studies.

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Michael Cowling

Dr Michael A. Cowling is an information technologist with a keen interest in educational technology and technology ubiquity in the digital age, especially as it relates to International students and those from non-English speaking backgrounds.

He is currently a Visiting Project Scientist in the Department of Informatics at University of California Irvine (UCI), where he is on sabbatical from his substantive position as a Senior Lecturer in Educational Technology at CQUniversity Australia.

Dr Cowling is the recipient of three CQUniversity Learning and Teaching grants related to teaching technology and was a 2015 recipient of the Vice-Chancellors Award for Outstanding Contribution to Learning & Teaching; as well as a 2007 recipient of the CQUniversity Award for Excellence in Learning & Teaching (International Campuses).

He is actively researching in the area of educational technology and technology ubiquity and has conducted numerous radio and print media interviews on the topic.

He was also a member of the Vice-Chancellors Excellence in Teaching Committee at CQUniversity and has written oped opinion pieces for The Courier Mail, Campus Review and Education Review.

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Michael Dougan

Michael specialises in EU Law, particularly EU constitutional law, the Single Market and EU welfare law.

His work on the EU constitution and institutions covers processes of constitutional reform as well as the relationship between Union law and the national legal systems. He has published widely on the EU's constitutional framework after the Lisbon Treaty, on the principle of direct effect of Union law in national courts, and on the enforcement of Union law.

Michael has also written extensively on single market law, especially the free movement of goods, persons and services, and processes of harmonisation of Member State laws.

In the field of EU welfare law, Michael's research has focused on the interaction between free movement rights and social security entitlement and the impact of EU citizenship in this area. Michael looks in particular at the role played by the Court of Justice in shaping and delimiting citizenship and fundamental rights.

Together with other members of the Liverpool European Law Unit, Michael's research has contributed to wider public and political debates about European law. For example, Michael has provided written and oral evidence to a range of Parliamentary committees and enquiries; and acted as an external advisor to various Government departments and EU institutions on important developments - such as the enactment of the European Union Act 2011, the Review of the Balance of Competences Between the UK and the EU, and efforts to resolve the Eurozone crisis.

Michael is Joint Editor of the Common Market Law Review - the world's leading journal for European legal studies.

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Michael E. Webber

As Deputy Director of the Energy Institute, Co-Director of the Clean Energy Incubator, Josey Centennial Fellow in Energy Resources, and Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Dr. Michael E. Webber trains the next generation of energy leaders at the University of Texas at Austin through research and education at the convergence of engineering, policy, and commercialization. He has authored more than 200 publications, holds 4 patents, and serves on the advisory board for Scientific American. His television special Energy at the Movies is currently in national syndication on PBS stations, and his massive open online course (MOOC) “Energy 101” closed with record results in December. Webber holds a B.S. and B.A. from UT Austin and M.S. and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Stanford. He was honored as an American Fellow of the German Marshall Fund, an AT&T Industrial Ecology Fellow, and on three separate occasions by the University of Texas for exceptional teaching.

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Michael J. I. Brown

Associate professor, Monash University
I am an observational astronomer, studying how galaxies evolve over billions of years.

I was born and raised in Melbourne’s southeastern suburbs. My interest in astronomy began as a child, when the Voyager spacecraft visited the outer planets. I undertook my undergraduate and postgraduate studies at the University of Melbourne during the 1990s. For my PhD, I used (now antiquated) photographic plates to identify thousands of galaxies and measure their distribution in space.

In 2000 I joined the staff of the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, and started working on surveys of the distant Universe with large ground-based telescopes and satellites. In 2004 I was awarded Princeton University’s Henry Norris Russell Fellowship, and studied the growth of the most massive galaxies. Using thousands of galaxies in the constellation of Bootes, I found that the most massive galaxies have grown slowly over the past seven billion years, which is almost certainly due to mergers of galaxies.

Since 2007 I have been at Monash University’s School of Physics and Astronomy. I am measuring spectra of galaxies across the electromagnetic spectrum, which is useful for measuring the distances to galaxies, the luminosities of galaxies and how rapidly galaxies form stars. I am also using large astronomical surveys to measure how rapidly galaxies are growing, and how this growth compares to the growth of dark matter halos.

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Michael Keating

Michael Keating was born in 1950, graduated from the University of Oxford in Philosophy, Politics and Economics in 1971, gained his PhD at Glasgow College of Technology (now Glasgow Caledonian University) in 1975,and received the qualification of Incorporated Linguist (Institute of Linguists) in 1981. He has a doctorate honoris causa from the Facultés Universitaires Catholiques de Mons (Belgium). He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, a Fellow of the British Academy and an Academician of the Academy of Social Sciences.

He has worked at the University of Essex (1975-6), North Staffordshire Polytechnic (1976-9) and the University of Strathclyde (1979-88). From 1988 until 1999 he was Professor of Political Science at the University of Western Ontario. From 2000 until 2010 he was Professor of Political and Social Sciences at the European University Institute, Florence and was head of department between 2004 and 2007. He has held visiting positions at the Institut d'Etudes Politques de Paris; University of Santiago de Compostela; University of the Basque Country; Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; the Norwegian Nobel Institute; Nuffield College, Oxford; University of Grenoble; Autonomous University of Barcelona. He is presently part-time professor at the University of Edinburgh. From 2010 until 2013 he was Professorial Fellow and in 2013-14 he is Senior Fellow on the Future of the UK and Scotland programme..

Michael Keating speaks English, French, Spanish and Italian.

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Michael Kitson

University Senior Lecturer in International Macroeconomics at Cambridge Judge Business School, University of Cambridge

Michael Kitson is an Assistant Director of the Centre for Business Research (CBR), Cambridge, and is Hub Director of the UK-Innovation Research Centre. He has undertaken research for: the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC); the Department of Business Innovation and Skills (BIS); the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC); the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC); and the National Endowment for Science, Technology and the Arts (NESTA).

Michael Kitson was Assistant Director of the National Competitiveness Network (NCN) of the Cambridge-MIT Institute (CMI) between 2000 and 2003, and Director of NCN between 2003 and 2007. CMI was a joint venture between Cambridge University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to improve competitiveness, innovation and entrepreneurship in the UK. He has provided evidence and advice to: the EU; the House of Lords enquiry into globalisation; and various regional and local governments. He is currently advising the Northern Ireland Government about its innovation policy.

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Michael Posner

Co-director of the NYU Center for Business and Human Rights and the Jerome Kohlberg Professor of Ethics and Finance at NYU Stern, New York University Stern Center for Business and Human Rights

Michael H. Posner is the Jerome Kohlberg Professor of Ethics and Finance and a Professor of Business and Society at NYU's Stern School of Business, where he is working to launch the first-ever center on business and human rights at a business school. Prior to joining NYU Stern, Posner served from 2009 to 2013 in the Obama Administration as Assistant Secretary of State for the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor at the State Department. From 1978 to 2009, he led Human Rights First, a New York-based human rights advocacy organization.

Posner is recognized as a leader and expert in advancing a rights-based approach to national security, challenging the practice of torture, combating discrimination, and refugee protection. He is a frequent public commentator on these issues, and has testified dozens of times before the U.S. Congress. As Assistant Secretary, Posner traveled extensively, representing the U.S. Government to foreign officials and representatives of civil society in countries of strategic importance to the United States, including China, Russia, Egypt, Burma, Bahrain, Nigeria, Afghanistan, and Pakistan, among many others.

Throughout his career, Posner has been a prominent voice in support of human rights protections in global business operations in the manufacturing supply chain, the extractives industry, and the information and communications technology sector. As a member of the White House Apparel Industry Partnership Task Force in the mid-'90s, he helped found the Fair Labor Association (FLA), an organization that brings together corporations, local leaders, universities, and NGOs to promote corporate accountability for working conditions in the apparel industry. He was a founding member of the Global Network Initiative, a multi-stakeholder initiative aimed at promoting free expression and privacy rights on the Internet, and has spoken widely on the issue of Internet freedom. Posner spearheaded the U.S. Government's efforts to enhance the effectiveness of the Voluntary Principles on Security and Human Rights, which works to improve human rights around oil, gas, and mining operations.

Posner played a key role in proposing and campaigning for the first U.S. law providing for political asylum, which became part of the Refugee Act of 1980, as well as the Torture Victim Protection Act, which was adopted in 1992. In 1998, he led the Human Rights First delegation to the Rome conference at which the statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC) was adopted.

Before joining Human Rights First, Posner was a lawyer with Sonnenschein, Nath & Rosenthal in Chicago. He lectured at Yale Law School from 1981 to 1984, and again in 2009, when he taught with former Dean Harold Koh. He was a visiting lecturer at Columbia University Law School from 1984 to 2008. A member of the California Bar and the Illinois Bar, he received his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley Law School (Boalt Hall) in 1975, and a B.A. with distinction and honors in History from the University of Michigan in 1972. Posner resides with his family in New York City.

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Michael Rafferty

Mike has undertaken research on work, labour markets, skills development, occupational health and safety, and financial aspects of working life, including mortgage stress, superannuation and retirement. He has also written on the shifting of life course risks from employers and the state to workers and households and the growing role of financial markets in managing those risks. Previously, he was MBA Program Coordinator at the University of Wollongong. Mike holds a PhD in economics and has taught at universities in Australia and Europe.

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Michael S. Jaffee

Vice chair, Department of Neurology, University of Florida

Michael S. Jaffee, MD, is the Vice-Chair of Neurology at the University of Florida, where he joined the faculty in 2016. Prior to his current position, he was an associate professor of Neurology and Psychiatry at the University of Virginia, where he served as the inaugural clinical director of the Brain Injury and Sports Concussion Institute and director of the neurology sleep service. He graduated from the University of Virginia School of Medicine in 1992 and completed a combined residency in neurology and psychiatry at the San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium in San Antonio in 1998. He later went on to complete a sleep medicine fellowship there in 2011.

Dr. Jaffee is board certified in neurology, psychiatry, sleep medicine and brain injury medicine. He has additional certifications in behavioral neurology and neuropsychiatry, as well as neural repair and rehabilitation.

His 21-year Air Force career included wartime service as the chief of the medical staff for the largest U.S. military hospital in Iraq and service as the U.S. Air Force Surgeon General neurology consultant. He served as the U.S. Department of Defense liaison to two White House-appointed panels of the Defense Health Board, and as the national director of the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, where he managed a network of 18 sites leading to the publication of over 100 peer-reviewed articles and paved the way for research in the deployed combat area. Dr. Jaffee helped develop seminal clinical practice guidelines and tools for the management of traumatic brain injury. He has represented the Department of Defense with congressional testimony. He has served as a consultant to the Institute of Medicine, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, the National Institutes of Health and the Department of Labor.

Dr. Jaffee retired from the Air Force in 2013 at the rank of colonel. Now at UF, he continues to serve as a national and federal subject matter expert and serves as chair of the Peer Reviewed Alzheimer’s Research Program as part of the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Program. He also is the senior neurologist serving on the American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation national Brain Injury Medicine board examination committee.

Dr. Jaffee has dedicated a significant part of his career to developing innovative educational and research collaborations between the Department of Defense, federal agencies, academic institutions and other stakeholders, including the National Football League and the Alzheimer’s Association.

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Michael Selgelid

Professor Michael Selgelid is Director of the Centre for Human Bioethics, and the World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centre for Bioethics therein, at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. He is a member of the Board of Directors of the International Association of Bioethics and serves on the Ethics Review Board of Médecins Sans Frontières. Since 2014 he has served as an Advisor to the WHO Emergency Committee that led to Ebola being declared a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. His main research focus is public health ethics—with emphasis on ethical issues associated with infectious disease. He edits a book series in Public Health Ethics Analysis for Springer and a book series in Practical Ethics and Public Policy for ANU Press. He is Co-Editor of Monash Bioethics Review and an Associate Editor of Journal of Medical Ethics. Michael earned a BS in Biomedical Engineering from Duke University; and a PhD in Philosophy from the University of California, San Diego.

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-1541 %

January 31 00:00 UTC 854295854295m

ARAnnual Primary Balance*

Actual

Forecast

2016 bln ARS

Previous

Bln AR bln ARS

January 22 19:00 UTC 866115866115m

ARTrade Balance

Actual

Forecast

Previous

-1541 %

January 31 00:00 UTC 854295854295m

ARAnnual Primary Balance*

Actual

Forecast

2016 bln ARS

Previous

Bln AR bln ARS

January 31 00:00 UTC 854295854295m

ARAnnual Primary Balance*

Actual

Forecast

2016 bln ARS

Previous

Bln AR bln ARS

January 31 00:00 UTC 854295854295m

ARAnnual Primary Balance*

Actual

Forecast

2016 bln ARS

Previous

Bln AR bln ARS

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