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Neil Lee

Neil is an Assistant Professor of Economic Geography at the LSE. He is also Director of the MSc in Local Economic Development and the BSc in Geography with Economics. He joined the Department in 2013, having previously been Head of Socio-Economic Research at The Work Foundation. He holds a PhD in Economic Geography from the LSE and was a visiting scholar at TCLab, Columbia University.

His research considers cities, economic change and the social dimensions of innovation. He is particularly interested in the distribution of the proceeds of growth and the links between innovation and inequality. He has also published on the economics of the creative industries and the link between cultural diversity, innovation and urban economies.

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Neil Ormerod

Professor of Theology, Australian Catholic University

I began my academic career as a mathematician, obtaining a PhD in pure mathematics from UNSW in 1979. After working as a mathematician I began undertaking studies in theology, completing a Bachelor of Divinity, and Master of Theology from MCD before completing my DTheol

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Nello Cristianini

Nello Cristianini is a Professor of Artificial Intelligence at the University of Bristol since March 2006, and a recipient of both a ERC Advanced Grant, and of a Royal Society Wolfson Merit Award. He has wide research interests in the areas of data science, artificial intelligence, machine learning, and applications to computational social sciences, digital humanities, news content analysis.

He has contributed extensively to the field of statistical AI. Before the appointment to Bristol he has held faculty positions at the University of California, Davis, and visiting positions at the University of California, Berkeley, and in many other institutions. Before that he was a research assistant at Royal Holloway, University of London. He has also covered industrial positions. He has a PhD from the University of Bristol, a MSc from Royal Holloway, University of London, and a Degree in Physics from University of Trieste. Since 2001 has been Action Editor of the Journal of Machine Learning Research (JMLR), and since 2005 also Associate Editor of the Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research (JAIR). He is co-author of the books 'An Introduction to Support Vector Machines' and 'Kernel Methods for Pattern Analysis' with John Shawe-Taylor, and "Introduction to Computational Genomics" with Matt Hahn (all published by Cambridge University Press).

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Nial Wheate

Senior Lecturer in Pharmaceutics, University of Sydney

Dr Wheate completed a Bachelor of Science degree with 1st class honours from the University of New South Wales whilst at the Australian Defence Force Academy. He then completed a PhD in medicinal chemistry under Professor J. Grant Collins. Since then he has worked in the School of Biomedical and Health Sciences at the University of Western Sydney (Australia) and the Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Science (Scotland) before taking up a position in the Faculty of Pharmacy at the University of Sydney (Australia) in 2012.

Dr Wheate's research interests lie in whole-of-pipeline discovery and development of platinum-based anticancer drugs including: design and synthesis, in vitro and in vivo screening, drug-DNA binding, nanoparticle based delivery, solid state chemistry and co-crystals, toxicology and pharmacokinetics, and dosage formulation. Additionally, his research also examines the drug delivery application of macrocycles (including cyclodextrins, cucurbiturils and pillararenes) and their host-guest complexes.

Dr Wheate was previously the Head of Cancer Research in the Faculty of Pharmacy.

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Nicholas Fuller

Research Fellow, Clinical Trials Development and Assessment, University of Sydney

As a researcher at the University of Sydney my work focuses on the causes, prevention and treatment of obesity and metabolic disorders. Having worked in the industry both corporate and academic for over 10 years, I have had the pleasure of investigating a broad range of topics including dietary & exercise programmes, complementary medicines, commercial weight loss programmes, medical devices, bariatric surgery, satiety hormones, and the economics of obesity. The importance of a holistic approach to the treatment of overweight and obesity is something I am particularly passionate about implementing and dispelling the myth that one solution can fit all.

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Nicholas Mirzoeff

I am one of the founders of the academic discipline of visual culture. Since 1995, I have published a dozen books which have been translated into Chinese, Spanish, Korean, Italian and other languages. These include An Introduction to Visual Culture and (as editor) The Visual Culture Reader. In 2013, my book The Right to Look: A Counterhistory of Visuality (Duke, 2011) won the Anne Friedberg Award for Innovative Scholarship from the Society of Cinema and Media Studies. My new How To See The World: An Introduction to Images, from Self-Portraits to Selfies, Maps to Movies and More is just out from Basic Books.

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Nicholas Mosvick

Ph.D. Candidate, University of Mississippi

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Nicholas Rohde

Dr Rohde currently teaches in Statistics and Econometrics at Griffith University, and has research experience Inequality and income distribution.

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Nicholas Ross Smith

Visiting scholar, University of Auckland

Dr Smith is an International Relations expert with a keen focus on geopolitical and geoeconomic forces and their implications for foreign policy decision-making. His most recent research concerned competition between the EU and Russia in Ukraine, which spawned a number of journal articles and a forthcoming book on the Ukraine crisis (to be published with Edward Elgar, December 2016). Future research will concern the competitive geoeconomic environment of the Asia-Pacific and its challenges and opportunities for Australia and New Zealand.

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Nicholas Weaver

Nicholas Weaver received his bachelor’s degree in 1995 and his doctorate in 2003, both from UC Berkeley. He joined ICSI in 2003 as a postdoctoral fellow and was hired as a senior researcher the next year. From January 2010 to December 2011, he held a position as a visiting researcher at UC Berkeley and now currently holds a position as a visiting researcher at UC San Diego. He is a member of ICSI’s network security team, a co-developer of the Netalyzr system, and, in 2011, a co-winner of the FCC Open Internet Research Challenge. He is also a visiting lecturer in the CS Department at the University of California at Berkeley. His research interests include computer security and network measurement, with an emphasis on both large scale attacks and large scale measurement.

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Nick Dunn

Nick Dunn is Professor of Urban Design at Imagination, an open and exploratory research lab at Lancaster University where he is also Research Director for the Lancaster Institute for the Contemporary Arts. He is Associate Director of the Institute for Social Futures, leading research on the Future of Cities and Urbanism. His work responds to the contemporary city as a series of systems, flows and processes, and is explored through experimentation and discourse addressing the nature of urban space: its perception, demarcation and appropriation. His papers have been published and presented internationally and collaborative creative work exhibited across the UK, China and the Ukraine. His forthcoming book, Dark Matters: A Manifesto for the Nocturnal City will be published by Zero Books in 2016.

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Nick Fischer

Adjunct Research Fellow, Monash University

Nick Fischer is Adjunct Research Fellow in the School of Philosophical, Historical and International Studies at Monash University, and the author of "Spider Web: The Birth of American Anticommunism", published by University of Illinois Press (2016)

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Nick McKerrell

Lecturer in Law, Glasgow Caledonian University

Nick is a Lecturer in Law in the Department of Law, Economics, Accountancy and Risk. Nick teaches mainly in the area of Public Law, Human Rights and Civil Liberties. His research reflects this including many public law issues including: developments around the Scottish Parliament, constitutional legal theory, housing law and the changing ways in which the state interacts with society and individuals. Nick regularly appears on radio discussing civil liberties issues in Scottish society. He has also written on legal research skills for students at all levels.

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Nicole Badstuber

Nicole's research focuses on transport policy and governance for city regionas. Nicole is currently a researcher at LSE Cities' New Urban Governance project as well as a doctoral student at the Centre for Transport at UCL. Nicole is also currently supporting the Horizon 2020 funded project CREATE looking at the evolution of transport policy in cities in Europe.

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Nicole Porter

Dr Porter's interests, qualifications and experience span a range of built environment disciplines including landscape architecture, urban design and architecture. Following training at the University of Melbourne (PhD, M.Arch, Grad Cert L.Arch, BPD) Nicole taught landscape theory within the landscape program at Melbourne. In 2008 Nicole was appointed as lecturer in Landscape Architecture at the University of Canberra, where she taught a number of design studios, with projects ranging from individual residential gardens through to urban interventions / installations, critical urban design scenarios and the design and management of National Park landscapes.

Her current role at the University of Nottingham includes architecture studio teaching and research with a strong landscape and place making focus, as well as renewable energy and GI provision in heritage landscapes. Nicole has practiced as an urban designer with the Australian Capital Territory, Canberra, where she engaged in master planning work and strategic policy research. Nicole led the production of the PIA award winning Molonglo Valley Place making guide (2010). She is an academic member of the Landscape Institute.

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Nigel Hudson

Senior Lecturer in Law, Nottingham Trent University

Nigel Hudson is a Senior Lecturer at Nottingham Law School, and an active member of the research Centre for Legal Education. He started his legal career with five years as a solicitor at Edge & Ellison before joining Nottingham Law School as a Principal Lecturer in 1993. Since 2003 Nigel has worked for the University of Law as the Head of Learning Design, the University of Derby as the Online Learning Academic Lead in Law, and for CILEx as an Independent Adjudicator.

In December 2015 Nigel returned to Nottingham Law School to teach as a Senior Lecturer in Law. He is currently studying a Professional Doctorate in Legal Education at NTU, examining the Communities of Practice within the legal professions as his main area of research. He also covers Legal Informatics and Learning Technology as additional areas of research interest.

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Nigel Martin

Lecturer, College of Business and Economics, Australian National University

Nigel Martin is a Senior Lecturer and researcher at the National Centre for Information Systems Research (NCISR) at the Australian National University (ANU), and specialises in the theory and practice of technology strategy, e-security, enterprise systems architecture, and operational business management.

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Nigel Stapledon

Andrew Roberts Fellow and Director Real Estate Research and Teaching Centre for Applied Economic Research, UNSW Australia

Nigel has a PhD in Economics from UNSW and a Bachelor of Economics with Honours from the University of Adelaide. He started his career in Canberra 1976-86, where he worked in the Commonwealth Treasury. He then worked at the Westpac Banking Corporation 1986-2003 where he was Chief Economist from 1993. Nigel has been at UNSW Business School since 2003 where he completed a PhD on the long-run history of house prices in Australia (1880-2006). At the UNSW Business School, he was Associate Head of School 2008-13 and is now the Andrew Roberts Fellow in Real Estate in the Centre for Applied Economic Research (CAER). He established and now coordinates the real estate teaching program at the Business School and teaches the Real Estate Economics and Public Policy course for both undergraduate and postgraduate students. Nigel is a regular commentator in the media on macro-economics and housing.

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Nils Röper

I'm a doctoral researcher focusing on the political economy of pension and financial systems.

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Nina Dombrowski

Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Texas at Austin

I am a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Texas Marine Science Institute in Port Aransas. My research aims to understand the lifestyle of marine bacteria using the most recent “omic”-techniques. More specifically, my current project tries to unravel the metabolic capacities present in bacterial genomes and their metabolic potential. One topic I am working on deals with bacteria enriched during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, addressing the question how bacteria cope with oil contamination.

I am a biologist with a background in molecular biology. More specifically, I graduated in plant genetics and during my PhD I obtained an additional background in microbiology to better understand how microbes and plants interact. My current goal is to gain a better background in bioinformatics to better be able to tackle the research questions I am interested in.

Currently, I want to understand:
What are the microbes that can be found in marine ecosystems?
How can we use “omics” to uncover novel bacterial lineages?
What are their genomic and metabolic features?

Where I come from:
I did my PhD (just finished this year, in 2015) at the Max-Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research in Cologne. I investigated how rhizosphere and root-bacterial communities interact with Arabis alpina and two Brassicaceae plant species. I worked on 16S rRNA gene community profiling and also isolated numerous bacteria. The research questions of my PhD were (in a simplified way):
How are bacterial communities affected by their surroundings/ what determines how bacterial communities assemble on plant roots
(i.e. plant species, soil type, flowering time…)?
What is the effect of synthetic bacterial communities on plant growth?

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Noah Kofi Karley

Dr Karley obtained an MPhil and PhD in the field of Land Economy from University of Cambridge in 2002. Prior to that, he graduated in 1992 with BA (Hons) degree in Economics and Geography from University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana. In 1996, he achieved a First Class Master of Commerce in Economics from University of Zululand, South Africa; and in 2001, he obtained a Certificate for International Housing Finance Programme from Wharton School in the University of Philadelphia in the US. Dr Karley is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy, United Kingdom.

Dr Karley has a great deal of teaching and research experience in different countries including the United Kingdom (Cambridge University and Heriot Watt), South Africa and Ghana. Since March 2006 he has been a regular visiting lecturer to the Shanghai University of Finance and Economics in China. Dr Karley has experience of researching property & urban systems from an interdisciplinary (but predominantly economic) perspective. He has particular skills in using quantitative methods in assembling economic datasets at different spatial scales and analysis of property and housing market data. In the past, he has received research grants from various sources including the Scottish Government, RICS and ODPM, and has published research outputs in books and peer reviewed journals.

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Nuno Reis

Lecturer in Chemical Engineering, Loughborough University

My research is focused on the development of new microprocess engineering and process intensification concepts applied to biological and pharmaceutical systems. The multidisciplinary research themes span from microfluidics, surface chemistry, crystallisation, fermentation, cell culture, chromatography, electrophoresis, virus inactivation and clinical diagnostics areas. Main goal is to deliver disruptive technologies to fill up main technological gaps and unmet needs in high-value market sectors of (bio)pharmaceuticals and healthcare diagnostics. This requires a multi-scale approach by understanding the processes at meso-, micro- and nano-scale, all supported by state-of-the-art analytical tools and numerical modeling tools such as CFDs.

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Olav Muurlink

Senior Lecturer, organisational behaviour, management, CQUniversity Australia

Olav Muurlink is a social and health psychologist, specialising in work and wellbeing, as well as attitude change. He is a senior lecturer in organisational behaviour at Central Queensland University, with a background in media and manufacturing SMEs. He is also chair of the international education charity, Co-operation in Development, which builds and operates free schools for disadvantaged children the delta of Bangladesh.

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Oleg Benesch

Lecturer in East Asian History, University of York

BA (Alaska Fairbanks), MA (Reitaku), PhD (British Columbia)

Oleg Benesch is Lecturer in East Asian History, specializing in the history of early modern and modern Japan and China. Before arriving at the University of York, Oleg was Past & Present Fellow at the Institute of Historical Research at the University of London. He has spent almost six years living and researching in Japan, including two years at Hitotsubashi University in Tokyo.

Oleg’s publications and teaching interests cover a variety of fields, including Japanese intellectual, religious, and social history, Chinese intellectual history, as well as the transnational history of modern East Asia. He has presented his research findings at academic conferences and invited lectures throughout East Asia, Europe, North America, and Australia. Oleg’s recent monograph, Inventing the Way of the Samurai: Nationalism, Internationalism, and Bushido in Modern Japan, was published by Oxford University Press in 2014. He is a co-author of the 2015 book, Civilizing Emotions: Concepts in Nineteenth-Century Asia and Europe, also published by Oxford University Press.

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Olivia Remes

PhD Candidate, University of Cambridge

Olivia Remes is a PhD student at the University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on mental disorders and is using the European Prospective Investigation of Cancer (EPIC) study, one of the largest, European cohort studies looking at chronic diseases and the way people live their lives.

She has received a PhD studentship from the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR).

E-mail address: ror21@cam.ac.uk

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Oludayo Tade

Dr Oludayo Tade teaches Sociology of Deviant behaviour and Social problems at the Department of Sociology, University of Ibadan. He holds a PhD in Criminology. His research interests include crime, Media Studies, child labour, child trafficking, Family Studies, transactional sex and cybercrime.

He is an associate member of the Nigerian Institute of Public Relations (NIPR). Dr Tade was a recipient of the University of Ibadan Postgraduate School Scholar Award in 2008-2010. He was a grantee of the Institute for Money, Technology and Financial Inclusion (IMTFI), University of California, Irvine, United States of America in 2013. He is currently a 2015 grantee and the principal investigator on "Dimensions of Electronic Fraud and Governance of Trust in Nigeria's cashless ecosystem, being funded by IMTFI.

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Ottmar Edenhofer

Deputy Director and Chief Economist, Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research

Professor Ottmar Edenhofer is Professor of the Economics of Climate Change at the TU Berlin - Berlin Institute of Technology and Deputy Director as well as Chief Economist at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research. He currently leads Research Domain III - Sustainable Solutions - which is focusing on research in the field of the Economics of Atmospheric Stabilisation. In 2012 he was appointed director of the newly founded Mercator Research Institute on Global Commons and Climate Change (MCC). From 2008 to 2015 he served as Co-Chair of Working Group III of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), which won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2007. Ottmar Edenhofer supports the Science-Industry Cooperation, the Workgroup Climate, Energy and Environment within the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina as an active member, and furthermore advises the World Bank within the advisory committee of the Green Growth Knowledge Platform. Since 2013 he is also co-chairing the new Energy Platform by the European Council of Academies of Applied Sciences, Technologies and Engineering (Euro-CASE). In January 2015, Ottmar Edenhofer was elected a member of the German National Academy of Science and Engineering acatech due to his outstanding scientific achievements.

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Owen D. Thomas

Lecturer in Politics and International Relations, University of Exeter

My primary research interests lie in International Relations, British Foreign Policy and Security.

My current research examines the work of British public inquiries into issues of security and foreign policy. Briefly put, a public inquiry is an exercise in social science. It explains the occurrence of social phenomena. Social scientists are aware that their methodological commitments are productive. Methods and methodology ‘make social worlds’ by framing an explanation in terms of specific understandings of causation, structure and agency, and political responsibility. Through a range of qualitative methods this pioneering research explains how inquiries conduct their investigations, shaping contemporary policy debates and public discourse on security and strategy.

Funded by a highly competitive ESRC 1+3 Studentship, I completed my doctoral research in 2014, which examined the relationship between publicity, secrecy and security through the Iraq public inquiries. From 2003 Britain conducted several public inquiries, each obstructed by official secrecy justified on the grounds of national security. This led to an apparent dilemma whereby a liberal ideal of publicity was balanced against security. I rejected this balance. Instead I showed how publicity and official secrecy are both tools of security, and that the inquiries are a site of contestation between them. This research, grounded in a range of qualitative methodologies, showed how attempts to seek either publicity or secrecy constitute security practices. The inquiries and the British case for war were united by the same security practice, thus a resistance to government secrecy in the name of publicity reinforces rather than rejects the basis of liberal war.

My research has also generated important social and policy impact. I have been invited to speak on my research at the European Parliament, the Houses of Parliament, and on BBC radio.

Through my research activities I have developed a successful record of external funding, including awards from the British International Studies Association, the ESRC Festival of Social Science and an ESRC Overseas Institutional Visit award for a Visiting Scholar position at the New School for Social Research

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Owen Davis

PhD Candidate in Social Policy, University of Kent

I am a final year ESRC-funded PhD Candidate in Social Policy interested in the links between social benefit policies and mental health. In particular, I am concerned with how social benefit policies impact on social inequalities in mental health.

I became interested in this topic originally through my professional experience working in social care and local government. Since then I have applied an academic perspective to the question.

I also have interests in current issues in social policy such as the rise in food bank usage and associated food insecurity and have published on this (see below)

Did Food Insecurity rise across Europe after the 2008 Crisis? An analysis across welfare regimes., Social Policy & Society (2017)

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Oz Shy

Senior Lecturer in Economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Oz Shy has has published three books: How to Price (Cambridge University Press, 2008), The Economics of Network Industries (Cambridge University Press, 2001), and Industrial Organization: Theory and Applications (MIT Press, 1996). Oz Shy has published more than 60 journal and book articles in the areas of industrial organization, network economics, banking, payments, labor economics, and international trade. He serves on the editorial board of the International Journal of Industrial Organization, and maintains a Website on banking reform (www.BankingReform.org).

Oz Shy has taught at the Universities of Michigan, Haifa, Tel Aviv, Stockholm School of Economics, Hanken School of Economics, and the State University of New York, and was a research professor at the WZB - Social Science Research Center, Berlin.

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Pablo Calderon-Martinez

I am a Lecturer in Spanish at Aston University. My research focuses primarily on Spanish and Latin American (particularly Mexican) politics and social movements. Before moving to Aston, I was a Teaching Fellow in Spanish and European Studies at the Department of European and International Studies of King’s College London; I have also held academic positions in the Department of Political Economy at King’s College London and in the Politics and International Relations section at the New College of the Humanities.

I completed a PhD in Spanish and Mexican Politics at King’s College London in 2014, and I also hold an MSc in European Identities from the London School of Economics, and a BA in International Relations from ITESO University. Pablo has also held research positions at the Center for Advanced Study in the Social Sciences at the Juan March Institute in Madrid, and at the Department of International Relations at ITESO University. He has presented his research internationally, and has commented on Spanish, Latin American and European politics for the BBC, BBC World, CNBC, CNN, Canadian Television, The Independent, Monocle Radio, Voice of Russia, Share Radio and many other media outlets.

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Pam Ramsden

Lecturer in Psychology, University of Bradford

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Pandora Patterson

Adjunct Associate Professor, Cancer Nursing Research Unit, University of Sydney

Dr Pandora Patterson is General Manager of Research, Evaluation and Social Policy at CanTeen and Adjunct Associate Professor in the Faculty of Nursing, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney.

She has worked for ten years as a researcher in the area of psycho-oncology with a particular interest in measure development and intervention based research for young people living with cancer. She is also a registered psychologist undertaking regular clinical work.

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Park Thaichon

Assistant Professor of Marketing, S P Jain School of Global Management

My main research interests include Dark Marketing, Consumer Behaviour, Relationship Marketing and Integrated Marketing Communications. I am currently serves as an editorial board member for the Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics and the International Journal of Trade and Global Markets.

My research has been published in leading marketing journals including but not limited to the Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Journal of Business and Industrial Marketing, Journal of Strategic Marketing, Journal of Relationship Marketing, Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, International Journal of Bank Marketing, International Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Marketing, and Services Marketing Quarterly.

The fundamental aim of my research is for a better tomorrow. I wish that my current and future research would contribute to the overall benefits and well-being of the society.

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Parveen Akhtar

Dr Parveen Akhtar joined the University of Bradford as a lecturer in January 2014. Prior to this she was awarded a British Academy Research Fellowship, held at the University of Bristol (2011-2013). In 2010 she was a visiting scholar at Lahore University of Management Sciences before which she was an ESRC postdoctoral fellow at the University of Bristol (2008-2009).

Dr Akhtar completed her ESRC funded PhD at the University of Birmingham (2008) during which time she held research positions at the Institut für die Wissenschaften vom Menschen Institute for Human Sciences, Vienna (2007); the Institute for Migraiton and Ethnic Studies, Amsterdam (2006); Sciences Po, Paris (2006) and the School for Postgraduate Interdisciplinary Research on Interculturalism and Transnationalism, Aalborg (2005).

Dr Akhtar has published widely on Political Participation, Islam, Migration and Social Change in journals including; the British Journal of Politics and International Relations, the Political Quarterly and European Political Science. Her monograph, British Muslims Politics, was published by Palgrave in 2013. Dr Akhtar’s work has an international audience and she has presented her research in over 40 conferences in 15 countries. She makes regular contributions to public and media debates.

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