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Robyn Dowling

Professor and Associate Dean Research, University of Sydney

Robyn is an urban geographer and planner in the Faculty of Architecture Design and Planning. She has research expertise in patterns of urban mobility, transport disruptions, and urban governance in the face of climate change.

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Rod Lamberts

Dr Rod Lamberts is deputy director of the Australian National Centre for Public Awareness of Science (CPAS) at the ANU, which recently became affiliated with the Alan Alda Centre for Communicating Science at Stony Brook University. He is also a former national president of the Australian Science Communicators. Rod has been providing science communication consultation and evaluation advice for nearly 20 years to organisations including UNESCO, the CSIRO, and to ANU science and research bodies. He has a background in psychology, anthropology and corporate communication consultancy and facilitation.

Rod has been developing and delivering science communication courses since 1998, and supervises a large range of postgraduate research projects.

His professional and research interests include: science in society; science and public policy; perceptions of expertise in science; risk and crisis perception/ communication; and science communication as the new public intellectualism.

Rod is an extremely strong proponent of getting academia well beyond the hallowed halls and into the real world. His most recent forays into this world include regular appearances on ABC Radio National "Research Filter" and ABC radio Perth's "Blinded by Science". He was also a co-host of KindaThinky, and irreverent, theme-based chat show that ran in Canberra in 2014 and 15.

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Rodney Croft

Professor of Health Psychology, University of Wollongong

Croft has a PhD in psychology, with his thesis focusing on electrophysiology (EEG) methodology. His electrophysiology expertise has been extended into the RF-EMF health research, with his focus being laboratory research determining the effects of RF-EMF on awake and sleep EEG. Although a smaller aspect of his research, he has published RF-EMF epidemiological research, as well as substantial collaborative work employing in vitro and dosimetric methods to address the RF-EMF health issue. Croft is Director of the NHRMC CRE in RF-EMF health, the Australian Centre for Electromagnetic Bioeffects Research (ACEBR) and was Executive Director the forerunner Centre (Australian Centre for Radiofrequency Bioeffects Research), and is a Commissioner within the International Commission on Non-Ionising Radiation Protection (ICNIRP).

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Rodney Maddock

Rod has been a senior executive at the Commonwealth Bank for the last decade after earlier stints as Chief Economist for the Business Council of Australia, Head of Economic Policy in the Victorian Cabinet Office, and as a Professor of Economics at La Trobe University.

He is currently working on a book on the Australian economy.

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Rodney Stewart

Professor Rodney Stewart is the Digital Utility Transformation Professor at Griffith School of Engineering, Griffith University, located in Queensland, Australia. He conducts research on the applications of advanced technology (e.g. smart meters, network sensors, energy storage) and big data informatics for purpose of re-engineering the water and energy utility sectors.

In the water utility sector he has completed a number of high resolution smart water meter studies that provided the 'big data' to underpin detailed water end use studies, demand management strategies, bottom-up forecasting models, just-in-time pipe network infrastructure planning, water-energy nexus studies, post-meter and network leakage studies, to name a few.

In the electricity sector he is working on the necessary demand forecasting and power control systems that will provide cost-efficient power supply to customers through optimising existing and newly introduced renewable energy sources being added to the network through coupling them with distributed energy storage in an intelligent micro-grid arrangement. His goal is to conduct the necessary evidence-based research to demonstrate the numerous applications and benefits of intelligent water and electricity networks in order to accelerate the current slow rate of transformation of national and international utilities to the digital era.

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Roger Barlow

Roger joined Huddersfield in February 2011, having previously been at Manchester. After his PhD at Cambridge, he has worked on particle physics experiments at DESY (TASSO, and the discovery of the gluon, and subsequently JADE, and the measurement of the B lifetime) , CERN (OPAL doing precision studies of the Z ), and SLAC(BaBar, and the discovery of CP violation in B mesons). He is currently a member of the LHCb collaboration.

He has written a textbook on Statistics, founded the Cockcroft Institute, started the ThorEA association, and originated the National Particle Physics Masterclasses. He was the PI of the CONFORM project that led to the successful operation of EMMA, the worlds's first nsFFAG accelerator.

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Roger Dargaville

Roger works on optimisation and integration of renewable energy systems, linking together different technologies to find the least expensive, most reliable systems with the lowest carbon emissions possible. He also researches the chemistry of the stratosphere, and the impact of ozone chemistry on the surface climate.

Prior to returning to Melbourne in 2008, he worked for the International Energy Agency on the Energy Technology Perspectives 2008 publication. He has worked to integrate observing systems for the global carbon cycle, and on the impact of climate change on the carbon cycle.

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Roger King

Roger King is visiting professor at the School of Management at the University of Bath. He is also adjunct professor at the Teaching and Education Development Institute at the University of Queensland, Australia. He is research associate at the Centre for the Analysis of Risk and Regulation, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Roger is co-chair of the Higher Education Commission inquiry, and helped produce a report called 'Regulating Higher Education', launched in parliament in October 2013.

He has also recently concluded a six-year period as Visiting Professor at the Centre for Higher Education Research and Information (CHERI) at the Open University. Previously, in the 2000s, he has been a Visiting Professor at the following Australian universities: Griffith, QUT, and Sunshine Coast. He has also been Visiting Research Fellow at the Association of Commonwealth Universities (2003-5).

He was Vice-Chancellor of the University of Lincoln (UK) from 1989-2001 and the founding Chair of the Institute for Learning and Teaching in Higher Education (now the Higher Education Academy) from 1998-2001. He has been a member of the Board of the Observatory of Borderless Higher Education (OBHE) since its founding in 2001. He has undertaken various consultancy and Board positions in recent years.

He is also the Series Co-Editor (with Noel Entwistle) of Palgrave Macmillan's Universities into the Twenty First Century, which has produced a dozen or so well-received titles since 2002. He is also co-convenor of the Higher Education Policy Group for the Political Studies Association. He is on the research advisory group of the QAA.

Recent book publications include: The State, Democracy and Globalization (2003); The University in the Global Age (2004); The Regulatory State in an Age of Governance (2007); Governing Universities Globally (2009); and a Handbook on Globalization and Higher Education (with Simon Marginson and Rajani Naidoo, 2011). In addition he has written a number of published journal and other articles, including on global science; network power and social constructivism; in higher education model diffusion; university rankings; and risk-based regulation.

Currently he is researching marketization, risk governance, and social networks in higher education policymaking.

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Roger Watson

Professor of Nursing, University of Hull

Roger Watson is a graduate of The University of Edinburgh with a PhD in biochemistry from The University of Sheffield who qualified in nursing at St George’s Hospital, London. Working in care of older people, he has a special interest in the feeding and nutritional problems of older people with dementia. He is Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Advanced Nursing and Editor of Nursing Open. A frequent visitor to the Far East, South East Asia and Australia, he has honorary and visiting positions in China, Hong Kong, and Australia. He is Professor of Nursing, University of Hull, UK and was a member of the UK 2014 Research Excellence Framework sub-panel for Allied Health Professions, Dentistry, Nursing and Pharmacy.

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Romola Adeola

Legal Researcher, University of Pretoria

Dr Romola Adeola is a legal researcher with the Centre for Human Rights, Faculty of Law, University of Pretoria in South Africa. Her areas of expertise are law and policy aspects of migration, refugee protection and international development law. She holds a Doctor of Laws degree from the University of Pretoria.

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Ron Hira

Dr. Ron Hira, Ph.D., P.E., is an associate professor in the Department of Political Science at Howard University. Ron is also a research associate with the Economic Policy Institute in Washington, DC. Prior to joining Howard, Ron was an assistant and then associate professor and acting chair in the Department of Public Policy at Rochester Institute of Technology. He specializes in policy issues on technological innovation, offshoring, high-skill immigration, and the American engineering workforce.

Hira has written widely on offshoring, high-skilled immigration, innovation, and the decline of the middle class. Hira is co-author of the book, Outsourcing America (AMACOM 2005; 2nd edition 2008), which was a finalist for best business book in the PMA's Benjamin Franklin Awards. The Boston Globe called Outsourcing America an "honest, disturbing look at outsourcing." The Washington Post described the book as a "thorough and easy to grasp primer on the wrenching outsourcing debate."

In 2012, along with Prof. John Ettlie, Hira organized a National Science Foundation workshop on the Globalization of Engineering Research & Development. The result of the workshop is being turned into a book.

Previously, Ron worked as a control systems engineer and program manager with Sensytech, NIST, and George Mason University (GMU). He has been a consultant to numerous public and private organizations.

Ron completed his Post-Doctoral Fellowship at Columbia University's Center for Science, Policy, and Outcomes. He holds a Ph.D. in Public Policy from George Mason University (GMU), an M.S. in Electrical Engineering also from GMU, and a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Carnegie-Mellon University. He is a licensed professional engineer, a senior member of IEEE, and served as Vice President for Career Activities of IEEE-USA, the largest engineering professional society in America.

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Ron Johnston

Executive Director, Australian Centre for Innovation, University of Sydney

Professor Ron Johnston is Executive Director of the Australian Centre for Innovation (ACIIC) and a Professor in the Faculty of Engineering & IT at the University of Sydney.

Educated initially as a scientist in Australia, the UK and the US, he has devoted most of his career to develop a better understanding and application of the ways that science and technology contribute to economic and social development, of the possibilities for managing research and technology more effectively, and of insights into the processes and culture of innovation.

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Ronen Palen

Professor's Palan's work lies at the intersection between international relations, political economy, political theory, sociology and human geography. He wrote a number of books and numerous articles, book chapters and encyclopaedia entries on the subject of Offshore and Tax havens, state theory and international political economic theory. His work has been translated to Chinese, simple and complex characters, Japanese, Korean, Spanish, French, Russian, Italian, Azeri and Czech.

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Rosa Freedman

Senior Lecturer (Law), University of Birmingham

Rosa Freedman joined Birmingham Law School in 2011 having previously taught Law at Queen Mary, University of London. Rosa has written articles on legal matters for national media and online blogs, and has provided research and expertise to a number of NGOs. Her first book, The United Nations Human Rights Council: an early assessment was published in March 2013 and her second book Failing to Protect: The UN and Politicisation of Human Rights was published in May 2014.

Rosa researches and writes on the United Nations and international human rights law. She is interested in the extent to which UN human rights bodies discharge their mandates and the intersection of international law and international. Rosa has a broader interest in the impact of politics, international relations, the media, and civil society both on the work and proceedings of international institutions and on states’ compliance with international human rights norms.

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Roslyn Russell

Professor Roslyn Russell is a Principal Research Fellow in the School of Economics, Finance and Marketing at RMIT University. Roslyn holds a PhD in Business and a Masters in Public Policy and Management.

Roslyn has been researching in the area of financial literacy and financial inclusion over the last 10 years. Roslyn works closely with the Australian Government, the financial and community sectors seeking to improve the financial well-being of Australians. Roslyn's research in recent years has focused on the factors influencing the financial decision-making of women. Much of Roslyn's research has been conducting evaluations of microfinance programs including Australia's leading financial literacy programs, Saver Plus and MoneyMinded.

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Ross Guest

Ross Guest is a Professor of Economics, and Dean (Learning and Teaching), in the Griffith Business School at Griffith University. He is an Adjunct Professor with the Australia and New Zealand School of Government (ANZSOG) and a National Senior Teaching Fellow with the Australian Government Office for Learning and Teaching.

Before joining Griffith University in 1998 he spent 8 years at Monash University in Melbourne where he was appointed Senior Lecturer in 1997. He has a Ph.D in Economics from the University of Melbourne and a Master of Higher Education from Griffith University.
His current research programme is concerned mainly with the economics of population ageing in Australia and other regions of the world. He has published articles on this and related topics in, for example, the Journal of Population Economics, the Journal of Macroeconomics, The Economic Record, The Review of Development Economics, The Journal of Policy Modelling, Oxford Economic Papers, The Singapore Economic Review, The Journal of Asian Economics, and Economic Modelling. He has received 4 ‘Discovery Grants’ from the Australian Research Council, as 1st Chief Investigator, to support this work. He was an invited participant at the Prime Minister’s 2020 Summit in 2008 on the basis of his work on population economics.
His teaching in recent years has been primarily in public economics at Griffith University and for ANZSOG in their Executive Master of Public Administration where he is a Subject Leader for Australia and New Zealand. He is Editor-In-Chief of the International Review of Economics Education, and co-author with Stiglitz et al. of Principles of Economics, First Australian Edition.

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Rowena Ball

Associate professor, Australian National University

I am an applied mathematician and physical chemist.

Currently I am working on the origin of life in the primordial soup! Another current interest is Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander scientific and engineering heritage.

As an experienced thermodynamicist I am concerned about the widespread misunderstanding of thermodynamics, particularly of the second law and the concept of entropy, among people who are otherwise scientifically literate. If you do not have good working knowledge of the fundamentals of thermodynamics – specifically the Maxwell relations and their Legendre transforms – then it is better not to mention entropy or the second law in your articles, because you will most likely get it hopelessly, even ridiculously, wrong.

Currently in my research I am working collaboratively on new high efficiency systems for separating carbon from fuels and flue gases.

A spinoff is that I have elucidated the oscillatory thermal instability that led to the Bhopal disaster and initiates explosion of peroxide bombs used by terrorists.

My research expertise in reactive thermal runaway and thermal explosions is also motivated by process safety. Serious and fatal thermal runaway incidents are quite common in chemical plants in Asia and in developing nations, although they are rarely reported in the Western press. (E.g, see http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2011-08-19/hyderabad/29904559_1_kalpana-explosion-ketone.)

Most such incidents are preventable, but crucial knowledge that was made good use of by chemical engineers from the 1950s through the 1970s evidently never was learned in some relevant quarters. Ignorance is dangerous.

Recently I came across two papers in the refereed literature claiming to determine thermal runaway criteria for processes used to manufacture two types of explosives, which I read with horror and disbelief.

The authors prescribed operating criteria that they claimed are "safe" from thermal runaway, without carrying out ANY stability analysis. But there is a vicious oscillatory thermal instability in these systems, as an elementary stability analysis shows. Plant operators using their guidelines would be in for a nasty surprise - that is, if they survived. Due to their ignorance these authors' thermal 'safety' criteria are incorrect and dangerous.

This does not reflect well on the journals that published these two papers. Why were the serious shortcomings not picked up by referees?

In general science as fatally (literally) flawed as that in these two papers should not be left unchallenged but where real safety is involved and it puts human lives at risk one is morally obliged to correct it in the refereed literature. Our paper on this may be downloaded at http://arxiv.org/abs/1202.5550, it is published as: Ball, R., Gray, B.F., Thermal instability and runaway criteria: The dangers of disregarding dynamics. Process Safety and Environmental Protection (2012),
http://dx.doi.org/10.10/j.psep.2012.05.008.

On another front, I am researching the role of fire in sequestering CO2.

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Russell Blackford

I am a philosopher, literary critic, editor, and author, based at the University of Newcastle, Australia.

My recent books include: 50 Voices of Disbelief: Why We Are Atheists (Wiley-Blackwell, 2009; co-edited with Udo Schuklenk), Freedom of Religion and the Secular State (Wiley-Blackwell, 2012), 50 Great Myths About Atheism (Wiley-Blackwell, 2013; co-authored with Udo Schuklenk), Humanity Enhanced: Genetic Choice and the Challenge for Liberal Democracies (MIT Press, 2014), Intelligence Unbound: The Future of Uploaded and Machine Minds (Wiley-Blackwell, 2014; co-edited with Damien Broderick), and The Mystery of Moral Authority (Palgrave Pivot, 2016)..

I'm a prolific essayist and commentator with interests including legal and political philosophy, philosophical bioethics, philosophy of religion, and debates involving visions of the human future.

I am a Fellow with the Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies, a Laureate of the International Academy of Humanism, and Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Evolution and Technology.

I have also had some success as a science fiction and fantasy author, including my fantasy story "The Sword of God" (which won both a Ditmar Award and Aurealis Award in 1997) and an original trilogy written for the Terminator franchise. I've won the William Atheling, Jr., Award for Criticism and Review (in the fantasy and science fiction field) on three occasions, including for my co-authored book Strange Constellations: A History of Australian Science Fiction (Greenwood Press, 1999; co-authored with Van Ikin and Sean McMullen).

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Russell Dean Covey

Russell Covey, professor of law, focuses his research on criminal law and procedure. He is the author of numerous articles on topics including the death penalty, police interrogation, crime and popular culture, jury selection, and plea bargaining. As a member of the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, Covey has filed amicus briefs and represented pro bono clients in criminal appeals in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit and the U.S. Supreme Court.

Prior to joining the College of Law, he clerked for Judge Allyne R. Ross of the U.S. District Court, E.D.N.Y., practiced law specializing in criminal and civil litigation at Williams & Connolly in Washington, D.C., and taught law at Whittier Law School in Southern California. Covey teaches courses in domestic and international criminal law and criminal procedure. He received his J.D. at Yale Law School, M.A. at Princeton University and A.B at Amherst College.

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Ruth Dalton

Professor Dalton is an alumna of University College London. As a licensed architect, she has worked for Foster and Partners (London) and Sheppard Robson Corgan Architects (London) and key projects upon which she has worked include the Carré d’Art de Nîmes, in France, the Palaçio de Congresos in Valencia, Spain, and the Kings Cross International Terminal (unbuilt). She has taught at the Architectural Association, London, the Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, USA and the Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL.

Professor Dalton’s research interests are centred around the relationship between the spatial layout of buildings and environments and their effect on how people understand and interact in those spaces. Professor Dalton is an expert in space syntax analysis and is passionately interested in the use of virtual environments as a method for researching human factors in the built environment.

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Ryan Blumenthal

Blumenthal. Ryan, MBChB (Pret), MMed (Med Forens) Pret, FC For Path (SA) Dip For Med (SA) PhD (Wits) Senior specialist forensic pathologist at the University of Pretoria’s Department of Forensic Medicine. His chief field of interest is the pathology of trauma of lightning (keraunopathology). He has been involved in the publication of numerous articles and textbooks on lightning and electrothermal injuries and has helped generate international standard operating procedures and guidelines for lightning strike fatality and electrocution victims. He has published widely in the fields of suicide and other areas involving the pathology of trauma. His chief mission in life is to advance Forensic Pathology Services both nationally and internationally. Interests outside of forensic pathology include sleight-of-hand-magic, mountain-biking, bird-watching, squash, running and novel writing. He also has a personal interest in innovative strategies and techniques in conflict resolution.

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Ryan Manuel

Dr Ryan Manuel is a postdoctoral fellow at the Australian Centre on China in the World, The Australian National University. His research looks at how power is exercised in the Chinese political system, and how that exercise of power affects China's domestic and foreign policy. His most recent book was A New Australia-China Agenda, with Geremie Barmé.

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Sabrina Gaertner

I am a researcher in Laboratory Astrochemistry. While the focus of my PhD project was on gas-phase ion-neutral reactions and spectroscopy, I no switched fields to solid state astrochemistry. Currently I am investigating planet forming collisions (using microgravity environments) and the strucutral properties of interstellar water ices (using neutron scattering facilities).

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Sam Carr

Lecturer in Education, University of Bath

My research and teaching interests are focused upon the relationship between policy and psychology. I'm interested in how policy and discourse "shapes" us. I have published a lot in this area and am authoring my second book around educational policy and its link to motivation.

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Sam Jones

Sam Jones is an Associate Professor in Development Economics at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Sam specializes in research in applied macroeconomics, foreign aid effectiveness, labour markets and education quality, with a special focus on sub-Saharan Africa. Previously, Sam worked for the Bank of England and spent seven years supporting the Government of Mozambique. Since 2012, Sam has collaborated with Twaweza in the large scale learning assessment exercises undertaken by Uwezo across East Africa.

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Sam Power

Samuel is an ESRC funded doctoral researcher based in the Sussex Centre for the Study of Corruption (SCSC) interested in party funding regimes and corruption in Western Europe.

His thesis is titled: Party Funding Regimes and Corruption: Linkages, Relationships and Trends.

The research is a comparative study of three advanced democracies in Western Europe (Denmark, France and the UK) and investigates whether a certain type of party funding regime (e.g. public or private funding) leads to the prevalence of a certain type of corruption.

There has been little research - academic or otherwise - which attempts to investigate these linkages, the hypothesis is that certain types of party funding regime are not necessarily more corrupt than other types; but that perhaps different types of corruption occur in different types of party funding regime. It is important to understand more about how democracy is funded and how that might lead to specific types of corrupt practices.

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Sam Wylie

Associate Professor Sam Wylie is Principal Fellow of the Melbourne Business School.

His research and consulting is focused on the investment management and hedge fund industries, especially performance measurement and incentives.

In 2005 Dr Wylie’s work was published in the University of Chicago’s Journal of Business.

He was an Assistant Professor at the Tuck School of Business from 1997-2004. The Tuck School, is one of the world’s leading business schools, being ranked #1 in world by the Wall Street Journal in 2006. Dr Wylie’s courses at Tuck were regularly rated among the best at a school renowned for teaching excellence.

Dr Wylie obtained his PhD from the London Business School. He also has a Master of Economics degree from the Australian National University and a Bachelor of Engineering degree from the University of Western Australia.

From 1986-1992 he was an Intelligence Officer with the Australian Security Intelligence Organisation. Dr Wylie is married and has three young children.

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Samantha Ward

Lecturer Zoo Animal Biology, Nottingham Trent University

Dr Ward's research interests are linked to human-animal interactions and animal husbandry and management techniques to investigate impacts and improve captive welfare and reintroduction of species.

Previous work has investigated the impacts of stockmanship on the behaviour and welfare of zoo species and the impacts on behaviour, welfare and production of different management techniques during lambing on a commercial sheep farm.

Trustee of The Sumatran Tiger Trust an international charity working to protect the Sumatran Tiger and its habitat.

Secretary of the South Lakes Red Squirrel Group working to preserve the UK red squirrel population and encourage local support and populations of the red squirrel in the south lakes area.

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Samuel Alexander

Dr Samuel Alexander is a lecturer with the Office for Environmental Programs, University of Melbourne, teaching a course called ‘Consumerism and the Growth Economy: Interdisciplinary Perspectives’ in the Masters of Environment. He is also a research fellow with the Melbourne Sustainable Society Institute and co-director of the Simplicity Institute. In 2015 he published two books of collected essays, 'Prosperous Descent: Crisis as Opportunity in an Age of Limits' and 'Sufficiency Economy: Enough, for Everyone, Forever' both available from the Simplicity Institute publications page. His other books include 'Simple Living in History: Pioneers of the Deep Future', 'Entropia: Life Beyond Industrial Civilisation', and 'Voluntary Simplicity: The Poetic Alternative to Consumer Culture.'

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Samuel Kerstein

Professor of Philosophy, University of Maryland

Samuel Kerstein (PhD, Columbia University) is Professor of Philosophy. His research focuses on Kant's moral philosophy, normative ethics, and bioethics. Several of his current projects stem from his book How to Treat Persons (Oxford, 2013). For example, he is developing a Kantian conception of the dignity of persons and exploring its implications for issues in bioethics, including the fair distribution of scarce, life-saving resources and moral constraints on medical research.

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Samuel Redman

Sam Redman specializes in 19th and 20th century U.S. history with a focus on culture and ideas. In 2012, he completed his doctoral dissertation, "Human Remains and the Construction of Race and History, 1897-1945" at the University of California, Berkeley. At Berkeley, Redman worked at the Regional Oral History Office (ROHO) where he completed dozens of oral history interviews on a wide variety of subjects. At ROHO, he served as Lead Interviewer for the Rosie the Riveter / WWII Home Front Oral History Project and the Japanese American Confinement Sites Oral History Project - both in collaboration with the National Park Service. Working with a team at ROHO, he launched a project documenting the oral history of the San Francisco - Oakland Bay Bridge resulting in the completion of over a dozen new interviews with men and women who worked on the bridge. Before graduate school, he worked in several museums including the Field Museum of Natural History, Colorado History Museum, and Science Museum of Minnesota. He is the author of "Historical Research in Archives: A Practical Guide" published by the American Historical Association in 2013. His first book, "Bone Rooms: From Scientific Racism to Human Prehistory in Museums", was published by Harvard University Press in March, 2016.

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Samuel S. Holloway

Sam Holloway is an Associate Professor of Strategy and Entrepreneurship at the University of Portland. His research on business model innovations examines how strategy affects the design of organizational architectures and has been published in Academy of Management Journal, Strategic Management Journal, Academy of Management Best Paper Proceedings, Academy of Marketing Science Review, and Journal of Strategic Innovation and Sustainability, among others. His current research includes studying the business side of craft brewing. Based upon his research, Dr. Holloway (and fellow UP Professor, Dr. Mark Meckler) launched CRAFTINGASTRATEGY.COM, a global online learning community whose mission is to empower craft brewing entrepreneurs to run profitable businesses, so they can create more jobs and transform their local communities for the better. Additionally, Sam teaches undergraduate and MBA courses in strategy, entrepreneurship, and innovation. Sam also helped launch the Pamplin School of Business’ first online courses as part of the school’s Continuing Education Certificate: Craft Beer Business Strategy.

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Sandile Swana

Sandile Swana is an ICT entrepreneur and part-time lecturer at the Wits Business School Municipal Finance Programme. He completed a BComm at Wits in Economics and Business Information Systems, a BComm Hons Logistics at UNISA, and holds an MBA from the University of Pretoria. He has also completed BTh and BTh Hons in Christian Ethics and Leadership through UNISA. He is a member of Institute of Information Technology Professionals of South Africa and also the Institute of Risk Management of South Africa. Areas of interest:
African Development Economics; Entrepreneurship; Risk Management; Strategy; African Leadership; African Ethics; African Technology Development; ICT; African Logistics; Cost Management; Local Government.

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Sandro Galea

Dean, School of Public Health, Boston University

Dr Galea is a physician and an epidemiologist. He is Dean and Professor at the Boston University School of Public Health. Prior to his appointment at Boston University, Dr Galea served as the Anna Cheskis Gelman and Murray Charles Gelman Professor and Chair of the Department of Epidemiology at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health where he launched several new educational initiatives and substantially increased its focus on six core areas: chronic, infectious, injury, lifecourse, psychiatric/neurological, and social epidemiology. He previously held academic and leadership positions at the University of Michigan and at the New York Academy of Medicine. In his own scholarship, Dr Galea is centrally interested in the social production of health of urban populations, with a focus on the causes of brain disorders, particularly common mood-anxiety disorders and substance abuse. He has long had a particular interest in the consequences of mass trauma and conflict worldwide, including as a result of the September 11 attacks, Hurricane Katrina, conflicts in sub-Saharan Africa, and the American wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. This work has been principally funded by the National Institutes of Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and several foundations. He has published over 500 scientific journal articles, 50 chapters and commentaries, and 9 books and his research has been featured extensively in current periodicals and newspapers. His latest book, co-authored with Dr Katherine Keyes, is an epidemiology textbook, Epidemiology Matters: a new introduction to methodological foundations. Dr Galea has a medical degree from the University of Toronto, and graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University. He was named one of TIME magazine’s epidemiology innovators in 2006. He is past-president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and an elected member of the American Epidemiological Society and of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies of Science. Dr Galea serves frequently on advisory groups to national and international organizations. He has formerly served as chair of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s Community Services Board and as member of its Health Board.

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Sanjay Goel

Sanjay Goel is an Associate Professor in the Information Technology Management Department (School of Business) at the University at Albany, SUNY. He is also the Director of Research at the New York State Center for Information Forensics and Assurance at the University. Before joining the university, he worked at the General Electric Global Research Center. Dr. Goel received his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering in 1999 from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

His current research interests include security & privacy that focus on information security along with privacy behavior; innovative education and pedagogy; and also security models i.e. biological models, risk models, and security policies. He also conducts research on forensics and cybercrime as well as on critical infrastructure, the first explores three fields: copyright and media piracy; botnets; and networks forensics. The second focuses on smart grid, including privacy in smart grid data analytics; impact of security and terrorism on financial markets; resilient transportation; and resilient service oriented architecture. Dr. Goel research interests also include hardware Trojans and secure chip design, and cyberwarfare.

He is invited to present seminars at several conferences in information security with topics including, wireless security, hacking, botnets, etc. and has several publications in leading conferences and journals. Dr. Goel teaches several classes including, Computer Networking & Security, Information Security Risk Analysis, Security Policies, Enterprise Application Development, Database Design and Java Language Programming.

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