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Maria Kozlovskaya

Maria joined the Business School as a Lecturer in Microeconomics in September 2015. She is at the last stage of her PhD studies at the University of Leicester. Before joining Huddersfield, she taught at the Univesity of Birmingham, and before that worked as a senior economist in Russian Regional Development Bank. Her doctoral studies were sponsored by the ESRC.

Maria's research interests lie in the areas of Game Theory, Behavioural Economics and Information Economics. In her PhD thesis, she developed axiomatic models of social preferences and investigated information exchange between firms via industrial espionage. She also programmed and ran an economic experiment which studied preference for fairness in social dilemmas.

Maria is a lecturer for the following modules:

Intermediate Microeconomics and Quantitative Economics (2nd year BSc Economics)
Microeconomics (MSc Economics)

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Mariaelena Gonzalez

Assistant Professor of Public Health, University of California, Merced

Dr. Gonzalez is an Assistant Professor in Public Health at the University of California Merced in the fields of Social Epidemiology, Health Disparities, and Health Policy. Her current research focuses on health disparities, including oral health disparities, and the ways in which social and environmental factors affect health risk behaviors. Dr. Gonzalez’s research areas include tobacco control, and understanding the unexpected risks and benefits of tobacco control policies, as well as the linkages between tobacco use and other risk behaviors. Dr. Gonzalez also studies the ways in which health behaviors differ between first, second, and third generation Latinos. Dr. Gonzalez’s previous research has examined scientific and medical occupational pipelines, the passage of smokefree laws in the United States, as well as the passage of smokefree laws in the Netherlands.

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Marianna Fotaki

Marianna holds degrees in medicine, health economics, and a PhD in public policy from London School of Economics and Political Science. Before joining academia in 2003 she has worked as a medical doctor in Greece, China, and the UK, as a volunteer and manager for humanitarian organizations Médecins du Monde and Médecins sans Frontiers in Iraq and Albania, and as the EU senior resident adviser to governments in transition (in Russia, Georgia and Armenia). Marianna is at present a Senior Editor for Organization Studies, and co-directs pro bono an online think tank Centre for Health and the Public Interest a charity that aims to disseminate research informing the public and policy makers (http://chpi.org.uk).

Marianna is also a Network Fellow at the Edmond J Safra Center for Ethics, Harvard University in 2014-2015.

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Marie Gillespie

Professor of Sociology, The Open University

Marie is co-director of Centre for Research on Socio-Cultural Change. She researches diaspora and national media cultures comparatively, historically and ethnographically. Her interests cluster around South Asian and Middle Eastern diasporas, cultural transnationalism, and changing configurations of audiences and publics in relation to question of citizenship. Recent collaborative include: a large-scale study of the BBC World Service as a multi-diasporic institution; an exploration of the new politics of security via a collaborative ethnography of transnational news cultures in multi-ethnic British households in eight UK cities; a national survey with the BBC on the changing face of British humour, ethnic jokes and comedy. Marie was awarded an AHRC Public Policy Fellowship in 2011 to develop research on the interface between international broadcasting and social media, specifically in relation to the BBC Arabic Services.

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Marieke Riethof

Marieke Riethof has a PhD in Political Science and International Relations from the University of Amsterdam and is a lecturer in Latin American Politics at the University of Liverpool.

Her past research and publications focused on political strategies of the labour movement in Brazil, including the Latin American regional context. She is currently finishing a book on the trajectory and political strategies of the Brazilian labour movement. Her new research projects focus on Brazilian foreign policy in the context of international relations in Latin America. The project examines traditional as well as non-traditional areas of foreign policy, including environmental politics and human rights. In May 2011, she was an expert witness at the House of Commons Foreign Affairs Committee on UK-Brazil relations and Brazil's emerging global role. A second project deals with the role of transnational solidarity movements and exile in the opposition to military dictatorship in Chile with an initial focus on the UK.

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Mario Herrero

Chief Research Scientist, Food Systems and the Environment, CSIRO.

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Marit Haldar

Professor of Sociology, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences

I am a professor of sociology at the University College of Oslo and Akershus in Norway. My main interests are gender studies, social politics and childhood and family Research.

My work includes analysing gender, the welfare state, vulnerable subjects and lately also differences in healthcare treatment to look at social inequality. I study standards and the general cultural understandings that produce what is understood as different, or deviant.

II have also published several international articles about research methods. Within qualitative methods I've discovered untapped data sources and developed new procedures.

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Mark Beeson

Mark Beeson is Professor of International Politics at the University of Western Australia. Before joining UWA at the beginning of 2015, he was Professor of International Relations at Murdoch University. Previously he taught at the universities of Griffith, Queensland, York (UK) and Birmingham, where he was also head of department. He is co-editor of Contemporary Politics, and the founding editor of Critical Studies of the Asia Pacific (Palgrave)

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Mark Clapson

I gained a BA (Hons) in History from the University of Lancaster in 1982, and an MA in Modern Social History at Lancaster in 1983. I was awarded my doctorate at the University of Warwick in 1989 on the history of betting and gambling in England from 1823-1961.

I have previously worked at the Open University and the University of Bedfordshire. Following my early research on the history of betting and gambling in Britain, I increasingly focused on suburbanization and new town development, and currently work on air raids, the reconstruction of London since the Blitz, and sectarianism and suburban housing in Belfast. So 'conflict and the city' sums up my present research neatly enough.

I have widespread academic impact. My research has been translated into Dutch, French, Italian and Japanese, and I have given conference and seminar papers in Australia, Britain, Canada, Belgium, Brazil, Finland, France, Italy, Japan, Portugal, Spain and the USA. I have over 450 citations on Google Scholar. I have also been widely interviewed by the media, notably for BBC Radio 4, BBC Three Counties Radio, and the Economist.

Serving on the AHRC Peer Review College, the Steering Committee of History UK (HE), the Editorial Board of Planning Perspectives, the Editorial Board of the University of Westminster Press, and the Editorial Board of the Journal of Administrative Sciences (Yönetim Bilimleri Dergisi (Turkey), I am actively engaged in national and international networks of academic historians. I am one of the international participants in the University of Antwerp's Urban Studies Institute network “Urban Agency: The Historical Fabrication of the City as an object of study”, a five-year programme of workshops that began in January, 2016. In December 2015 I was invited onto the 'Panel of experts' of the Romualdo del Bianco Foundation, Florence.

I have refereed articles for many historical journals, and also town planning journals. I am a peer reviewer for the AHRC, the Leverhulme Trust and FWO (Belgium).

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Mark Giancaspro

Mark Giancaspro is a Lecturer at the University of Adelaide Law School. He holds an honours degree in Laws and Legal Practice from Flinders University and a PhD from the University of Adelaide. His legal employment background and research interests are both primarily commercial, with issues in contract law and its various applications being his principal theme. Mark teaches in contract law, business law, tort law and sports law and has published widely on matters including issues with the formation and renegotiation of contracts, and the doctrine of consideration. He is on the editorial committee for the Alternative Law Journal and has volunteered at community legal centres.

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Mark Graham

Mark Graham is an Associate Professor and Senior Research Fellow at the OII, a Research Fellow at Green Templeton College, and an Associate in the University of Oxford’s School of Geography and the Environment.

He has published articles in major geography, communications, and urban studies journals, and his work has been covered by the Economist, the BBC, the Washington Post, CNN, the Guardian, and many other newspapers and magazines. He is an editorial board member of Information, Communication, and Society, Geo:Geography, and the Environment, and Big Data and Society. He is also a member of DFID’s Digital Advisory Panel and the ESRC’s Peer Review College.

In 2014, he was awarded a European Research Council Starting Grant to lead a team to study 'knowledge economies' in Sub-Saharan Africa over five years. This will entail looking at both low-end (virtual labour and microwork) and high-end (innovation hubs and bespoke information services) in fifteen African cities.

Research interests

Internet Geography, ICT for development, globalization, economic geography, transportation and communications, social theory, transparency, user-generated content, Southeast Asia, East Africa, zombies

You can follow him on Twitter at @geoplace

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Mark Humphery-Jenner

Associate Professor of Finance, UNSW Australia

Mark is an Associate Professor of Finance at UNSW Business School. His research interests are mainly in corporate governance and in law & finance. His work has appeared in major finance journals such as Journal of Financial Economics, Review of Financial Studies, and Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis. He received his PhD in finance from UNSW in 2012 and has also received qualifications in law.

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Mark Lorch

Dr Mark Lorch is a senior lecturer in biological chemistry at the University of Hull. He trained as a protein chemist, studying protein folding and function. His research now focuses on the chemistry of a broad range of biological systems including lipids, proteins and even plant spores.

Mark is also a dedicated science communicator, he blogs at www.chemistry-blog.com and occasionally for the Guardian. He gives regular talks to schools, the public and conferences (sometimes all at once, at science festivals or TEDx) and he occasionally pops up on the radio and TV explaining science and technology to a public audience.

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Mark Maslin

Professor of Climatology, UCL

Mark Maslin FRGS is a Professor of Physical Geography at University College London. He is a Royal Society Industrial Fellowship and Founding Director of Rezatec Ltd. He is science advisor to the Global Cool Foundation, Climatecom Strategies, Sopra-Steria, and Carbon Sense Ltd. He is member of Cheltenham Science Festival Advisory Committee. Maslin is a leading scientist with particular expertise in past global and regional climatic change and has publish over 150 papers in journals such as Science, Nature, Nature Climate Change, The Lancet and Geology. He has been awarded research council, charity and Government grants of over £40 million. His areas of scientific expertise include causes of past and future global climate change and its effects on the global carbon cycle, biodiversity, rainforests and human evolution. He also works on monitoring land carbon sinks using remote sensing and ecological models and international and national climate change policies.

Professor Maslin has presented over 45 public talks over the last three years including UK Space conference, Oxford, Cambridge, Leeds, RGS, Tate Modern, Frontline Club, Fink Club, Royal Society of Medicine, British Museum, Natural History Museum, The Baker Institute, Goldman Sachs and the Norwegian Government. He has supervised 10 Research fellows, 15 PhD students and 25 MSc students. He has also have written 8 popular books, over 30 popular articles (e.g., for New Scientist, The Times, Independent and Guardian), appeared on radio and television (including Timeteam, Newsnight, Dispatches, Horizon, The Today Programme, Material World, BBC News, Channel 5 News, and Sky News). His latest popular book is the high successful Oxford University Press “Climate Change: A Very Short Introduction” the third edition was published in 2014 and has sold over 45,000 copies. Maslin was also a co-author of the 2009 Lancet report ‘Managing the health effects of climate change’. He was included in Who’s Who for the first time in 2009 and was granted a Royal Society Wolfson Research Merit Award for the study of early human evolution in East Africa in 2011. He is currently the Director of the London NERC Doctoral Training Partnership.

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Mark McGovern

Senior Lecturer, QUT Business School, Economics and Finance, Queensland University of Technology

Dr Mark McGovern currently lectures in international economics and finance for international business at QUT. Funded industry research projects have included work for Queensland Main Roads on Financing Transport Infrastructure and for South West Natural Resource Management on Agricultural Viability.

Mark’s long term research interest is in industry development in open economies. This saw him invited to the 2020 Summit with follow up research on food security. He is an active member of the Rural Finance Roundtable Working Group.

As an applied economist with experience over many industries, he draws from theoretical areas of regional, industry and international economics; impact analysis; and economics more generally.

Mark has convened a number of summits and seminars to promote dialogues on matters of importance to the Queensland and Australian economies.

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Mark McLay

Mark joined GCU having just completed his PhD at the University of Edinburgh in 2015. His thesis examined the Republican party's challenge to the War on Poverty between 1964 and 1968 and he is currently working to expand it into book which will take the project into 1973 when the Nixon Administration closed the Office of Economic Opportunity (and thus effectively ended the War on Poverty).

He has taught primarily American History for over five years at a variety of institutions. He currently teaches an Honours course on the 1920s and 1930s in the US.

Mark is primarily interested in the political history of the twentieth century in the United States and the United Kingdom. In particular, he enjoys researching the influence of prominent politicians on their respective country's history. Are they able to instigate successful social change? Are they able to shape public opinion, or are they forever shaped by it? He is also especially interested in the intersection between politics and socio-economic policy in the US during the twentieth century.

Mark co-hosts and produces the American History Too! podcast with Dr. Malcolm Craig. Episodes on issues ranging from the 1920s Scopes Monkey Trial to the HIV/AIDS Crisis in the 1980s can be found on iTunes or http://americanhistorytoo.podbean.com/.

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Mark Moritz

My research focuses on the transformation of African pastoral systems. I examine how pastoralists adapt to changing ecological, political and institutional conditions that affect their lives and livelihoods. I have been conducting research with pastoralists in the Far North Region of Cameroon since 1993. The long-term research has resulted in strong collaborations with local researchers, which has allowed me to develop innovative, interdisciplinary research projects with colleagues at the Ohio State University and the University of Maroua in Cameroon. Check out my website for more information about my research and teaching activities: http://mlab.osu.edu

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Mark New

Director, African Climate and Development Initiative, University of Cape Town
Mark New was appointed Pro-VC for Climate Change and Director of the ACDI in July 2011. He is also Professor of International Development (part time) at the University of East Anglia. His research focuses on climate change detection, processes, scenarios, impacts and adaptation. He sits on the SA Global Change Science Committee, is on the editorial board of Environmental Research Letters, and various other science committees and reference groups.

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Mark Payton

Mark Payton, Ph.D., is a Professor and Head of the Department of Statistics at Oklahoma State University. He has been on the faculty at OSU for 25 years. His research spans many disciplines, including political modelling, biomedical sciences, and biology.

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Mark Robert Anderson

Professor in Computing and Information Systems, Edge Hill University

After gaining a PhD from the University of Liverpool, Mark worked for a number of large commercial organisations in software development. This work as allowed to gain a broad range of experiences in all aspects of the software lifecycle in industries which have represented the automotive, retail and financial sectors as well as working in consultancy for a number of years.

Since moving into Higher Education, Mark has been employed as a Professor in Computing and Information Systems, and has led courses at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels in subjects such as Grid Computing, Distributed Systems and Java Programming. He has also introduced new subjects into the Computing curriculum in collaboration with colleagues, such as Physical Computing to engage the students with programming activities. Mark has also successfully supervised a number of students through the dissertation/project process and is currently the Programme Leader for BSc(Hons) Computing (Application Development) course and Programme Leader for the MSc Advanced Software Application course.

He has also worked with a number of external clients to develop novel solutions for interacting with customers. In this capacity, solutions have been developed using Microsoft Kinect cameras, Leap Motion, mobile devices and embedded systems.

Mark is currently the Director of the Centre for Data Analysis and Representation on behalf of the department. The group consists of an expanding team and is currently undertaking a number of research projects with national and international partners. Examples of the research projects which the group are investigating includes the Software Validation Project which is researching quality assurance of one of the most significant software models in the world. Mark is also leading the group’s involvement on the international HistorySpace project, and is working with national organisations in developing further projects. Mark is the lead academic on two KTP projects which are aimed at utilising data analytics and visualisation to enhance business processes for local SMEs.

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Mark Skilton

Mark's research interests are in technology ecosystems around defining value and monetization; multi-channel operating model strategies; data standards, governance and compliance, and visualization strategies.

He has led large multi-division and multi-country transformation programs in a variety of public and private companies across their supply chains including retail, automotive, aerospace, pharmaceuticals, food & drink, electronics, utilities, transport, financial services and defense. Mark's experience includes new media multi-channel services, big data analytics and mobile ecosystems for new business models having worked directly in digital TV and media organizations and telecommuncations companies for marketing and new business services development.

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Mark Stuart

Assistant Professor, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Nottingham

Mark Stuart is an Assistant Professor in the School of Politics and International Relations. For the last twenty years, his main research area (along with Professor Philip Cowley) has been in the realm of parliamentary voting behaviour. He has also published widely in the field of British political biography, having penned portraits of Douglas Hurd (1998) and John Smith (2005). His latest biography - on Eric Forth - is due to be published in the late autumn of 2017.

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Mark Taylor

Mark Taylor is Dean of Warwick Business School, where he is also Professor of Finance. As well as previously holding a number of senior academic appointments, he has extensive experience of the finance industry as a foreign exchange trader and as a financial markets economist at both the Bank of England and the International Monetary Fund. Prior to taking up the Deanship at Warwick in 2010, he worked as a Managing Director at BlackRock, the world’s largest asset manager, where he led the European arm of a multi-billion dollar hedge fund.

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Mark van Rijmenam

Mark van Rijmenam is Founder of Datafloq. Datafloq is the One-Stop Source for Big Data, creating the Big Data ecosystem by connecting all stakeholders within the global Big Data market. He is an entrepreneur, a highly sought-after international public speaker and a Big Data strategist.

He is author of the best-selling book Think Bigger - Developing a Successful Big Data Strategy for Your Business. He is co-founder of ‘Data Donderdag’ a bi-monthly (networking) event in The Netherlands on Big Data to help organizations better understand Big Data. He is named a global top 10 Big Data influencer.

In 2016 he started with his PhD doing research on the role and influence of Big Data / Internet of Everything on strategic innovation at UTS.

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Mark Webber

Professor of International Politics, University of Birmingham

Mark Webber is an International Relations specialist. Having begun his academic career specialising in Russian foreign policy, he has spent the last fifteen years teaching and researching foreign policy analysis, security studies and international organisation. The specific focus of his current research is the politics of NATO and European security cooperation. Professor Webber worked for nearly twenty years at Loughborough University before moving to Birmingham in January 2011 as the Head of the School of Government and Society.

Research and academic interests:

The politics, history and theoretical interpretation of NATO
Foreign policy analysis
Security governance
EU external relationsy
Comparative international organization
Russian foreign policy and the international politics of the former Soviet Union

Current and recent projects:

NATO after Afghanistan (ESRC Seminar Series, concluded October 2015).
Theorizing NATO
Europe after Enlargement
NATO: Survival or Regeneration? British Academy (completed 2007)
Inclusion, Exclusion and the Governance of European Security, Leverhulme Research Fellowship (completed 2004)
Security Governance in the New Europe, joint holder, Economic and Social Research Council, ‘New Security Challenges’ programme (completed 2002)

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Mark Widdowson

Mark is a Teaching and Supervising Transactional analyst, and a UKCP and European Association for Psychotherapy registered psychotherapist.

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Marshall Eakin

Professor of History, Vanderbilt University

Marshall Eakin is a historian of Latin America specializing in the history of Brazil. Although his work spans all of Brazilian history, his major publications have concentrated on the processes of nationalism and nation-building, economic and business history, and industrialization—primarily in the twentieth century.

His first book, British Enterprise in Brazil: The St. John d’el Rey Mining Company and the Morro Velho Gold Mine, 1830-1960 (Duke, 1989), traces the history of the most successful foreign enterprise in 19th- and 20th-century Brazil. Tropical Capitalism: The Industrialization of Belo Horizonte, Brazil (Palgrave, 2001) examines the industrialization of the second-largest industrial center in Brazil.

Much of his work addresses audiences beyond the academy. This work includes Brazil: The Once and Future Country (St. Martin’s, 1997), a one-volume introduction to Brazil for beginners and two video courses with the Great Courses, The Conquest of the Americas and The Americas in a Revolutionary Era. His more recent book is The History of Latin America: Collision of Cultures (Palgrave Macmillan, 2007). Eakin’s latest book project is “Becoming Brazilians: Race and National Identity in Twentieth-Century Brazil” to be published by Cambridge University Press in 2017.

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Marta González

Professor Gonzalez works in the area of urban computing, with a focus on the intersections of people with the built environment and their social networks. Her team designs urban mobility solutions and to enable the sustainable development of smart cities. Prof. González has introduced new tools into transportation research and is a leader in the emergent field of urban computing.

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Martin Archer

Space Plasma Physicist, Queen Mary University of London

Dr Martin Archer is a Space Physicist at Queen Mary University of London (and Imperial College London). Martin became a published scientist whilst still an undergraduate, working on the Cluster space mission. It is this work which has inspired his PhD research on structures and waves in the Earth’s magnetosphere.

In addition to his research, Martin is determined to come up with fresh perspectives on how to communicate his love of science, especially to young audiences, and has worked on a number of exciting and unique projects including his DJ Physics shows, the Droppin’ Science Podcast, WiiJing and appearances at numerous science festivals and schools.

You’ll regularly see Martin on television both in the UK and internationally discussing the latest physics news, explaining scientific concepts and championing the importance of engaging the public with science. In addition to this Martin has featured on the BBC Radio 4 Today programme, the Guardian Science Weekly podcast and has written numerous science pieces and been profiled by a number of publications including The Guardian, The Times and MSN.

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Martin Bortz

I am a current PhD student at the University of Melbourne. I am studying the role of knowledge in public policy, and the way in which that shapes power dynamics between different political actors.

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Martin Conway

My research and publications have been driven by a number of overlapping interests in European history from roughly the 1930s to the 1960s.

One central element of that interest has been the history of Belgium, which has been much overlooked in the historiography of the twentieth century, but which provides a fascinating example of the interplay of factors of class, of ideology and of linguistic identity. I have published two books on Belgium, most recently (in 2012) The Sorrows of Belgium, and am continuing with research on its post-1945 history, most notably the so-called question royale and the history of the working class.

My other interests are broader and more comparative. I have been the editor of a number of collaborative volumes, including ones on political exiles during the Second World War, on Catholic politics, on political legitimacy in mid-twentieth century Europe, on democracy, on Europeanisation, and on violence.

All of these, though diverse in subject manner, have been primarily concerned with the interface between the social and the political. In particular, I have been concerned to explore what made (and un-made) political stability in Europe across the upheavals of the 1930s and 1940s and into the post-war period, and I am currentlky writing a book about how democracy was understood and practised in Western Europe from the Second World War to the end of the 1960s. I am also involved in a number of collaborative research projects, involving historians across Europe, and am the editor of The English Historical Review.

I teach widely on the history of this period, and have supervised a number of doctorates: on religion in France, on inter-war socialism, on aspects of Belgian history, on Catholic politics and intellectual trends. I should be happy to hear from prospective graduate students interested in working in fields relevant to my interests.

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Martin Hurcombe

I am principally interested in the relationship between representations of conflict and politics in early twentieth-century France. I am the author of Novelists in Conflict: Ideology and the Absurd in the French Combat Novel of the Great War and France and the Spanish Civil War: Cultural Representations of the War next Door, 1936-1945. I am also interested in the relationship between political commitment and utopianism and the memory of the First World War in twentieth-century French culture. I am a member of the executive committee of the Group for War and Culture Studies (GWACS), based at the Universities of Bristol, Swansea and Westminster, and am one of the editors of the Journal of War and Culture Studies. In addition to this, I also have an interest in French crime fiction, particularly the novels of Sébastien Japrisot.

My teaching interests are French literature, culture, and history of the early twentieth century. I also teach general history and literature courses in Year 1 and final-year language. I am unit convenor for two final-year units: Representations of War, which studies the depiction of war in the twentieth-century French novel and cinema, and Challenging the Republic, which examines a variety of political movements that have contested the form of the French Republic since the 1920s. In the 2nd year I convene The Third Republic, which studies the social and political history of France from 1870 to 1940, and co-teach Modern French Narrative, a unit examining French fiction from the 1920s to the present. I also teach courses on war and culture at postgraduate level and am co-supervising two M.Litt/PhD theses: James McFarthing, ‘Utopian Theory and the Science Fiction of Jules Verne’ and Claire Thomas, ‘Ungaretti, giornalista’. I am also currently Deputy Head of School Teaching and Learning.

I would particularly welcome research students working on 20th-century cultural representations of conflict and/or political engagement and cultural politics in France.

My students can consult me in my office at the following time during term times:Thursday 10-11am and 3-4pm.
Biography

I studied French and Italian at the University of Exeter where I also later completed a PGCE (after a year working at the Université de Rennes II). I spent several years in secondary education pretending that I didn't miss academia until coming to Bristol as a PhD student. I completed my doctoral thesis, 'Forming the Modern Mind: A Reappraisal of the French Combat Novel of World War One', in 2000 under the supervision of Gino Raymond. That same year, I became a lecturer here in the Department of French.

I am one of the editors of the Journal of War and Culture Studies and an executive member of the Group for War and Culture Studies, currently based at the University of Westminster.

I am a keen runner and cyclist and an occasional triathlete.

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Martin Moore

Dr Martin Moore is director of the Centre for the Study of Media, Communication and Power, and a Senior Research Fellow in the Policy Institute at King’s College London. He was previously founding director of the Media Standards Trust (2006-2015) where he directed the Election Unspun project and wrote extensively on the news media and public policy. Recent research publications include:

Election Unspun: Political Parties, the press, and Twitter during the 2015 election campaign (2015); Who was hacked? An investigation into phone hacking and its victims (2015); Addressing the Democratic Deficit in Local News through Positive Plurality (2014) and IPSO: An Assessment (2013).

He is author of The Origins of Modern Spin (Palgrave Macmillan 2006) and ‘Plurality and Local Media’ in Media Power and Plurality, ed Steven Barnett and Judith Townend (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015).

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Martin Stute

Professor of Environmental Science, Columbia University

When I was about eight-years-old, I did not speak to my parents for a whole day because they threw a banana peel out of our car, which I found was unacceptable from an environmental point of view. I knew early on that I wanted to dedicate my career to environmental issues and studied Physics, because there was no such thing as Environmental Science back then. My PhD thesis research topic at the University of Heidelberg focussed on novel tracer techniques to study the dynamics of ground water flow, and the use of ground water as an archive of paleoclimate. I have been interested in water issues ever since and can still hardly resist to take a plunge into a thermal spring I encounter or take a sip from a well that might tap an interesting aquifer. I believe that water will play an increasingly important role in our attempts to achieve a sustainable global development. I am also trying hard to be a decent teacher and undergraduate and graduate student adviser, because I think that is where faculty members have the most influence on the future of our planet.

Some of my projects include:

Health Effects and Geochemistry of Arsenic and Lead
San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD/EarthScope)
Carbon Sequestration
Natural Gas Production by Hydraulic Fracturing

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Mary-Louise McLaws

Professor of Epidemiology Healthcare Infection and Infectious Diseases Control, UNSW Australia

Professor Mary-Louise McLaws is an epidemiologist who's expertise is infection control and prevention. She works in collaboration with the World Health Organization Advisor and the Clinical Excellence Commission providing advise on infection control programs and interventions to improve patient safety. Mary-Louise has partnered on patient safety improvement projects in Vietnam, Cambodia, Indonesia, Taiwan, China, Malaysia, and Turkey.

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