Menu

Search

Featured Post

Free speech on campus means universities must protect the dignity of all students

By Sigal Ben-Porath

The following is an edited excerpt from a talk to be given at the Magna Charta at McMaster University on Oct. 16, 2019. Free speech, a staple of modern democracy, has become the focal point for political and cultural...

As Turkish troops move in to Syria, the risks are great - including for Turkey itself

By Mehmet Ozalp

Turkey did not waste much time in launching an attack on Syrian soil just days after US President Donald Trump announced he would withdraw US forces from northern Syria. As this development opens a new chapter in Syria,...

Coal miners and urban greenies have one thing in common, and Labor must use it

By Fabio Mattioli Et Al

Months after Labors shock election loss, it is still pondering how the Liberals metamorphosed from party of the bosses to party of the workers - one that stole an election win from under them. At the May 18 federal...

Shh! Don't mention the public housing shortage. But no serious action on homelessness can ignore it

By David Kelly Et Al

Today, October 10, is World Homeless Day. Next week the Council to Homeless Persons will convene the Victorian Homelessness Conference to discuss options for ending homelessness. On the program are presentations and...

The latest medical assistance in dying decision needs to be appealed: Here's why

By Trudo Lemmens Et Al

The federal and Québec governments appear reluctant to appeal whats known as the Truchon decision, which invalidated Canadas reasonable foreseeable death and end of life access criteria for medical assistance in...

PhD students should prepare for careers beyond becoming professors

By Jonathan Malloy Et Al

Every year, a new wave of students begin PhD programs in Canada, often aiming for a future academic career. Yet despite hopeful beginnings, large numbers dont achieve this goal. Many PhD students do not complete their...

Curators translate visual art into beautiful things you can touch

By Patricia Bérubé

A shift is taking place in museums and the way art history is presented globally. More museums now value visitor experience and at the same time, there is a growing emphasis on accessibility in Canadian public...

Why we need 'crazy' ideas for new city parks

By Wendy Walls

Two seemingly unrelated but important things happened in Melbourne last week. One was a memorial service for David Yencken AO; the other was the exhibition opening of the Future Park Design Ideas Competition. The...

For Russia, talk of Trump impeachment is the gift that keeps on giving

By Cynthia Hooper

The Russians are calling it Ukrainegate. I never thought Id say it, but CNN is right, remarked one pundit on Russia 1, the countys most-watched television station. The person who wins in this situation is...

Coal mines can be closed without destroying livelihoods – here's how

By Owen Douglas Et Al

Countries across the globe are trying to wind down coal production. While this will help in the battle against climate change, those communities that have specialised in coal mining may see their local job market decline...

6 ways to establish a productive homework routine

By Janine L. Nieroda-Madden

Homework. Whether youre a fifth-grader or a freshman in college, the mere thought of homework can be overwhelming. And actually doing homework can be quite difficult. But homework doesnt have to be something a student...

Games blamed for moral decline and addiction throughout history

By Lindsay Grace

Video games are often blamed for unemployment, violence in society and addiction including by partisan politicians raising moral concerns. Blaming video games for social or moral decline might feel like something new....

Curious Kids: why is the sea salty?

By Sally Little

Why is the sea salty? Torben, aged nine, Sussex, UK. Two thirds of the Earths surface is covered in water, and 97% of that is salty seawater. Only 3% of our planets water is fresh, and 2% is trapped, frozen in ice...

When doctors and parents disagree on how to treat a sick child the emotional and financial costs can be huge

By Forbat Forbat

When a child is sick and parents and doctors disagree about what to do next, who is best placed to make that decision? This is a tricky but not uncommon question with a number of recent high-profile legal cases...

British people hardly ever thought about the EU before Brexit, now it dominates their lives

By Barry Richards

The polling agency Ipsos MORI has, for many years, asked people in Britain every month what they think are the most important issues facing the country. In December 2015, only six months before the EU referendum and after...

Fake news: emotions and experiences, not more data, could be the antidote

By David Knights Et Al

At a time when public debate around the world is suffering from a collision between facts and alternative facts, experts must find new ways to reach people. According to the Washington Post, Donald Trump has made more...

What are hives, the common skin condition that gives you itchy, red bumps?

By Rodney Sinclair

Have you ever wondered who buys those huge boxes of antihistamines prominently displayed all year round in your local pharmacy? If antihistamines were just used for hay fever, youd think sales would be good in spring, but...

Cosmic theorist and planet-hunters share physics prize as Nobels reward otherworldly discoveries

By Michael Cowley

This years Nobel Prize in Physics has been awarded to three researchers for their contributions to two unique fields. Half of the 9 million Swedish krona (A$1.34 million) award goes to James Peebles, a Canadian...

Fast evolution explains the tiny stature of extinct 'Hobbit' from Flores Island

By José Alexandre Felizola Diniz-Filho Et Al

Its not every day that scientists discover a new human species. But thats just what happened back in 2004, when archaeologists uncovered some very well-preserved fossil remains in the Liang Bua cave on Flores Island,...

Who's responsible for the smart city? Sidewalk Labs' proposal poses regulation challenges

By Natasha Tusikov

Sidewalk Labs nearly 1,500-page Master Innovation and Development Plan was released in June 2019. The document exhaustively detailed proposals for a smart city on Torontos eastern waterfront. Following nearly two years...

Compassionate 'zero-suicide' prevention on campuses urgently needed

By Debbie Bruckner Et Al

Even with a concerted response to improve mental health at universities, mental health crises still occur. The issue of suicide has been in the news lately, and students are looking to universities to respond. The...

Nobel Prize in Physics for two breakthroughs: Evidence for the Big Bang and a way to find exoplanets

By Robert T. Fisher

Did the universe really begin with a Big Bang? And if so, is there evidence? Are there planets around other stars? Can they support life? The 2019 Nobel Prize in Physics goes to three scientists who have provided deep...

Can hiding likes make Facebook fairer and rein in fake news? The science says maybe

By Marian-Andrei Rizoiu

This is the first article in a series looking at the attention economy and how online content gets in front of your eyeballs. You may have read about or already seen, depending on where you are the latest tweak to...

Looking to rent a home? 6 things that will help or hinder you

By Bronwyn Bate

Two-thirds of tenants in Australia rent through a real estate agent. A national shortage of private rental housing forces these tenants to impress the real estate agent to secure a property their application needs to...

Honk if you love Untitled Goose Game: why we should invest more in our indie game creators

By Luke Brook

A new comedic video game about a mischievous goose has become a viral sensation - reaching the top of the digital sales charts, inspiring a steadily increasing stream of memes and fan-art, and earning celebrity...

Nobel Prize in Physics: James Peebles, master of the universe, shares award

By James Geach

During the press conference in which he was revealed as one of the winners of the 2019 Nobel Prize in Physics, James (Jim) Peebles was asked to point to a single discovery or breakthrough from his long career that would...

A deep dive into what drives protests in Ghana

By Lewis Abedi Asante

The history of protests in Ghana reveals three persisting themes. These may suggest what Ghana and some other countries could do to avoid protest action in future. My study found that over time, Ghanaians have tended to...

What is a healthy blood pressure?

By Sandra Jones1 Et Al

More than 7m people in the UK have high blood pressure; it is a leading cause of cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular events such as heart attacks and strokes, associated with one in four deaths. As many as 5.6m...

Electric cars are here - but we’ll still need fuel for a long time

By David Reiner Et Al

Electric cars are often seen as one of the great hopes for tackling climate change. With new models arriving in showrooms, major carmakers retooling for an electric future, and a small but growing number of consumers eager...

Investigations usually hurt a president's public reputation – but Trump isn't usual

By Douglas L. Kriner Et Al

Will the House impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump ultimately have any effect? Democratic Speaker Nancy Pelosi had long resisted calls for impeachment, arguing that it is just not worth it. However, the Trump...

Fundamentalism turns 100, a landmark for the Christian Right

By William Trollinger

These days, the term fundamentalism is often associated with a militant form of Islam. But the original fundamentalist movement was actually Christian. And it was born in the United States a century ago this...

Government restrictions on labeling products as 'meat' aren't likely to help anyone

By Trey Malone Et Al

Substitutes for traditional meat products have captured the attention of investors, the media and consumers. Plant-based meat options are showing up in grocery stores and on the menus at fast food chains like Burger King...

Food labels too complicated for most shoppers to understand – new research

By Dawn Liu

Think back to the last time you went food shopping, did you check the labels for nutritional information? If you did, chances are it still felt tricky to know exactly what was in your food: how do you decide between a can...

The surprising decline of entrepreneurship and innovation in the West

By Wim Naudé

The idea that we are living in an entrepreneurial age, experiencing rapid disruptive technological innovation on a scale amounting to a new industrial revolution is a pervasive modern myth. Scholars have written academic...

What Donald Trump's decision to abandon Kurdish fighters in Syria means for the Kurds, Assad and Russia

By Ali Bilgic

In a move likely to further destabilise the situation in Syria and the Middle East, Donald Trump appeared to give Turkey the green light on October 6 for a military operation into northern Syria. The area is currently...

The UK doesn't spend enough on the mental health of young people – we found out why

By Stephen Rocks Et Al

In 2016 the then health secretary, Jeremy Hunt, declared child mental health services the biggest single area of weakness in the NHS. He might have added that it is also vastly underfunded. The mental health of children...

Still at war with the tobacco epidemic, Indonesia must control e-cigarettes too

By Beladenta Amalia

Several countries are banning e-cigarettes due to revelations of health risks to both users and bystanders. But in Indonesia, the worlds second-largest cigarette market, the government has yet to put in place policies...

How sports and arts can help prevent youth homelessness

By Tristan Hopper Et Al

Despite decades of policy and programming, youth homelessness remains an urgent issue in many communities across Canada. Almost 50 per cent of adults experiencing homelessness first became homeless before the age of 25,...

Governments took the hard road on clean energy – and consumers are feeling the bumps

By Guy Dundas

More than two years on from the sudden closure of Victorias Hazelwood coal power station, quite a mess remains. It is clear the federal governments market interventions have not worked. Electricity prices are higher and...

Domain name fraud: is the global Internet in danger?

By Hervé Debar

In late February 2019, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), the organization that manages the IP addresses and domain names used on the web, issued a warning on the risks of systemic Internet...

Red meat study caused a stir – here's what wasn't discussed

By Richard Hoffman

Accurate, consistent dietary advice seems increasingly hard to find. For instance, a widely reported study recently claimed that people dont need to reduce their consumption of red and processed meat for health reasons....

B Corp certification won't guarantee companies really care for people, planet and profit

By Michael O'Regan

Weeks after the collapse of his restaurant group and the loss of 1,000 jobs, celebrity chef Jamie Oliver announced that he was creating an ethical B Corporation or B Corp, a sort of company certification designed to show...

Facial recognition is being used in job interviews – it will probably reinforce inequality

By Ivan Manokha

Artificial intelligence and facial analysis software is becoming commonplace in job interviews. The technology, developed by US company HireVue, analyses the language and tone of a candidates voice and records their facial...

Conservatives poll lead continues, despite Brexit turmoil

By Paul Whiteley Et Al

Trends in vote intention polls show that the Conservatives continue to have a sizeable lead over their rivals. As of October 1, the Conservatives were on 33%, with Labour and the Liberal Democrats running well behind, tied...

Ben Ali: the Tunisian autocrat who laid the foundations for his demise

By Pamela Abbott

Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali, Tunisias former long-time president who died in mid-September, will probably be remembered best as the first autocrat to fall during the popular uprisings that spread across the Middle East in...

The Supreme Court and refugees at the southern border: 5 questions answered

By Karla Mari McKanders

I sat in a small room in Tijuana, Mexico with a 13-year-old indigenous Mayan Guatemalan girl. She left Guatemala after a cartel murdered her friend and threatened to rape her. Her mother wanted her to live and believed...

Trump’s America shines bright for Europe's radical New Right

By Sylvia Taschka

Donald Trump might not be as popular in Europe as Barack Obama was, but for many groups on the far-right of Europes political spectrum, he has become a heroic figure. With Trump, the pride of a whole population has...

Indonesia's huge fires and toxic haze will cause health problems for years to come

By Maria C. Lo Bue

Indonesia is currently in the throes of an environmental emergency. Thousands of hectares of forest are burning across the vast country, causing toxic smoke to be released into the atmosphere. This has led to eerie...

It takes 21 litres of water to produce a small chocolate bar. How water-wise is your diet?

By Brad Ridoutt

Our diets can have a big environmental impact. The greenhouse gas emissions involved in producing and transporting various foods has been well researched, but have you ever thought about the water-scarcity impacts of...

Myth busted: China’s status as a developing country gives it few benefits in the World Trade Organisation

By Henry Gao Et Al

Whether China is a developing or a developed country for the purposes of the World Trade Organisation matters a lot to the US president. President Donald Trump ignited a new front in the US-China trade war in July by...

Trump's ratings slightly down after Ukraine scandal as Warren surges to tie Biden in Democratic polls

About two weeks since a transcript of Donald Trumps phone conversation with the Ukrainian president was revealed, his approval with all polls in the FiveThirtyEight aggregate is 41.6% and his disapproval is 54.0%. Trumps...

U.S. import prices rise modestly in September on surge in petroleum, underlying trend stays weak

17:58 PM| Commentary

U.S. import prices rose modestly in September, owing to surge in petroleum. Sequentially, import prices rose 0.2 percent, driven by 2.3 percent rise in petroleum. Stripping petroleum, import prices dropped 0.1 percent...

Canadian employment rise above expectations in September, jobless rate falls to 5.5 pct

15:07 PM| Commentary

Canadian employment rose above expectations in September. Canada created 53.7k jobs, as compared with the median consensus expectations of 7.5k. The six month employment trend now stands at a strong 40.4k clip. The jobless...

German consumer prices eased year-on-year in September on fall in energy product prices

12:15 PM| Commentary

German consumer prices came in at 1.2 percent year-on-year in September. According to the Federal Statistical Office, the inflation rate as measured by the consumer price index decreased again, with the prior months...

U.S. Treasuries plunge as investors turn risk-takers following hopes of positive trade talks

11:36 AM| Commentary Economy

The U.S. Treasuries plunged during Fridays afternoon session following resumption of talks between the United States and China in Washington yesterday and markets are hopeful of a positive outcome soon on the trade...

German bunds trade steady after September CPI remains flat m/m, unchanged y/y

10:16 AM| Commentary Economy

The German bunds remained steady during European session of the last trading day of the week Friday following a flat reading of the countrys consumer price inflation (CPI) for the month of September month-on-month, while...

CBR highlights downside risks to inflation; 25bp rate cut unlikely to weaken the ruble, says Commerzbank

08:15 AM| Commentary Central Banks Economy

The Central Bank of Russias (CBR) Governor Elvira Nabiullina spoke at a conference yesterday where she highlighted downside risks to inflation and the additional room now available for CBR to cut rates faster, according to...

Weak U.S. growth outlook provides Fed flexibility to offer more “insurance” rate cuts, says ING Economics

06:14 AM| Commentary Economy Central Banks

Weak growth outlook in the United States is providing the Federal Reserve the flexibility to offer more insurance rate cuts, according to the latest research report from ING Economics. US headline inflation was flat on...

Top Stories

Digital Currency Revolution Series: US-CFTC Chair Clarifies Ether’s Status as a Commodity

06:52 AM| Research & Analysis Digital Currency Insights & Views

While SEC maintains the conservative approach on cryptocurrencies by constantly declining bitcoin ETF proposals and by stating Bitcoin and Ethereum Are Not Securities, the new Chair of the CFTC (Commodity Futures Trading...

Turkish attack on Syria endangers a remarkable democratic experiment by the Kurds

By James L. Gelvin - 08:56 AM| Insights & Views

Turkeys attack on Kurdish-run territory in northern Syria will likely snuff out a radical experiment in self-government that is unlike anything I have seen in more than 30 years studying the Middle East. In a surprise...

Points for tries? The Rugby World Cup shows how bonus schemes can come unstuck

By Liam Lenten - 09:04 AM| Insights & Views Sports

If you want to know how bonus schemes can come unstuck, take a look at the Rugby World Cup Its inching its way towards the end of the group stage in Japan, where Australia takes on Georgia tonight. The bonus points on...

Is this study legit? 5 questions to ask when reading news stories of medical research

By Hassan Vally - 08:42 AM| Insights & Views Health

Who doesnt want to know if drinking that second or third cup of coffee a day will improve your memory, or if sleeping too much increases your risk of a heart attack? Were invested in staying healthy and many of us are...

Nobel Prize in Chemistry: how lithium ion battery inventors changed the world

By Harry Hoster - 08:45 AM| Insights & Views Science

This years Nobel Prize in Chemistry is shared by Michael Stanley Whittingham, John Bannister Goodenough and Akira Yoshino. These three world-leading scientists deserve enormous credit for their contributions to lithium ion...

Sharp rise in antidepressant use in over-65s despite depression prevalence remaining the same

By Antony Arthur Et Al - 08:46 AM| Insights & Views Health

More than 300m people suffer from depression around the world. Of those, about 7% are people over the age of 60. For older people, there are many challenges when it comes to identifying and treating depression. This is...

Econotimes Series

Economy

U.S. Treasuries surge ahead of September retail sales, Fed speeches

The U.S. Treasuries surged during Wednesdays afternoon session ahead of the countrys retail sales for the month of September, scheduled to be released today by 12:30GMT. Also, Chicago Fed President Evans and FOMC member...

UK gilts jump on lower-than-expected September CPI; BoE Governor Carney’s speech in focus

The United Kingdoms gilts jumped during European trading hours Wednesday after the countrys consumer price inflation (CPI) for the month of September came in lower than market expectations, albeit remaining unchanged from...

German bunds flat after Eurozone September CPI slips slightly, trade balance lower than estimates

The German bunds remained flat during European session Wednesday after the eurozones consumer price inflation (CPI) for the month of September, slipped slightly, falling short of market expectations as well. Also,...

NZ consumer prices rise 0.7 pct in September quarter, inflation pressures continue to build

New Zealands consumer price inflation was a little higher than expected in the September quarter, rising 0.7 percent q/q. The annual inflation rate dropped from 1.7 percent to 1.5 percent, largely due to the variability in...

KRW likely to recoup more of year-to-date losses along with yuan appreciation in coming weeks, says Scotiabank

The South Korea won is expected to recoup more of its year-to-date losses along with the yuan appreciation in the coming weeks, according to the latest research report from Scotiabank. The Bank of Korea lowered its...

Politics

Donald Trump’s alleged habit of ‘unwanted touching’ of women continues just before proposing to Melania Trump

Many people, especially the critics, have been having a hard time believing that the marriage and relationship between Donald Trump and Melania Trump are as good as they say it is. One of the pressing issues anchored to...

Melania Trump reacts to Donald Trump cheating allegations

Donald Trump and Melania Trump have always been in the limelight since they tied the knot. But the status of their marriage has become much more exposed to public speculations once they occupied the White House. Many...

Melania Trump: Is she distancing herself from Donald Trump’s political woes?

The past weeks have been hectic for the Trump administration, especially after an impeachment inquiry has been officially launched in the Congress in late September against President Donald Trump. Meanwhile, it is hard not...

How a 1905 debate about 'tainted' Rockefeller money is a reminder of ethical dilemmas today

Many nonprofits, including top universities and museums are confronting serious ethical dilemmas regarding accepting tainted money. The MIT Media Lab, an interdisciplinary research lab, has been widely criticized for...

Trump's bad Nixon imitation may cost him the presidency

Whatever Donald Trump does, Richard Nixon usually did it first and better. Nixon got a foreign governments help to win a presidential election over 50 years ago. Trumps imitation of the master has proven far from...

Science

HIV cure studies major advancements reported in 2019 spark hope

Finding a cure that would eliminate HIV from the body remains one of the biggest challenges in humanity. However, there have been numerous studies published this year alone that seemed to have proven that, ultimately, HIV...

Former NASA scientists insisted they found evidence of life on Mars

Scientists are usually very careful when answering questions on the long-running mystery of whether or not extraterrestrial life exists in space, especially on Mars. But a former scientist of the National Aeronautics and...

NASA Apollo 10 allegedly captured UFO images from space

Humans now have plenty of ideas on how space looks like, thanks to the numerous missions that the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and other similar agencies have launched over the years. However, images taken...

NASA rover allegedly captures an image proving there's life on Mars

It has been decades since humans started launching missions to space. At this point, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has already sent numerous rovers to Mars to observe the several sections of the...

Elon Musk reminded NASA it can share SpaceX’s IP to anyone; Agency unwilling to do so due to security concern

Elon Musk and NASAs partnership has been standing on rocky ground in recent months as the Commercial Crew endeavor has been delayed. The mission aims to put American astronauts to space using SpaceXs services, opting to...

Technology

'Fortnite: Chapter 2' to offer may new features and all-new island to navigate

Fortnite: Chapter 2 marks the return of the game after the black hole that lasted for 40 hours. Going offline for almost two days also signified the end of season 10, and now it is making its comeback and introducing...

‘The Sims 5’ release date depends on ‘TS4’ expansion contents

EA remains silent about their plans for The Sims 5. With that, fans of the life simulation video game series are looking at the possible remaining expansion contents for The Sims 4 to get an idea when an all-new title is...

‘Pokémon Sword and Shield’ release date: Upcoming entry needs 10.3 GB worth of storage

Nintendo is slated to reveal more information about Pokémon Sword and Shield in just a few hours. Until now, its difficult to discern what sort of detail is going to be shared. Is there a new Pokémon thats...

‘World of Warcraft Classic’ new dungeon arrives today; European servers to receive an update tomorrow

World of Warcraft Classic is preparing to bring in new content for the game, this time adding Dire Maul into the world. The dungeon was supposed to arrive next month but was slotted in early, hitting North American servers...

‘Elder Scrolls 4: Skyblivion’ release date: Developers will be changing areas on the map to reflect certain stories

Elder Scrolls 4: Skyblivion isnt expected to come out soon, and the games release is just adding more anticipation to an already anticipated title. Part of the reason for this excitement is due to the developers addressing...
  • Market Data
Close

Welcome to EconoTimes

Sign up for daily updates for the most important
stories unfolding in the global economy.