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David Bourne

Professor of Marine Biology, James Cook University
David Bourne has a joint position as a Senior Lecturer at James Cook University in Townsville and Principal Research Scientist at the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS). His training is in the area of molecular microbial ecology with his research focused on investigation of microbial diversity, structure and function in complex ecosystems.

As a research scientist and senior microbiologist at the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) his scientific interests and research areas included many aspects of marine science and microbiology including marine microbes for drug discovery and the microbial dynamics in aquaculture (Rock Lobster) larval rearing systems.

Over the last 15 years his research has focused on understanding microbial interactions with corals. This work is divided essentially into two areas, the first investigating the normal microbial communities associated with corals and their functional roles in maintaining coral fitness. The second research focus is to elucidate pathogens and mechanism of disease onset in corals and the implications this has on a stressed reef ecosystem in light of climate change being a major driver of coral reef degradation.

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David Bressoud

Professor Emeritus of Mathematics, Macalester College
David Bressoud was Director of the Conference Board of the Mathematical Sciences from 2017 through 2021. He is now Dewitt Wallace Professor Emeritus at Macalester College, having served on the faculty from 1994 to 2020. He is also a former President of the Mathematical Association of America, a Fellow of the American Mathematical Society, and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He served in the Peace Corps, teaching math and science at the Clare Hall School in Antigua, West Indies before studying with Emil Grosswald at Temple University and then teaching at Penn State for 17 years. He chaired the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science at Macalester from 1995 until 2001. He has held visiting positions at the Institute for Advanced Study, the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the University of Minnesota, Université Louis Pasteur (Strasbourg, France), and the State College Area High School.

​David has received the MAA Gung and Hu Award for Distinguished Service to Mathematics, the MAA Distinguished Teaching Award (Allegheny Mountain Section), the MAA Beckenbach Book Award for Proofs and Confirmations, and has been a Pólya Lecturer and a Leitzel Lecturer for the MAA. He is a recipient of Macalester's Jefferson Award. He has published over sixty research articles in number theory, combinatorics, special functions, and mathematics education. His other books include Factorization and Primality Testing, Second Year Calculus from Celestial Mechanics to Special Relativity, A Radical Approach to Real Analysis (now in 2nd edition), A Radical Approach to Lebesgue's Theory of Integration, Calculus Reordered: A History of the Big Ideas, A Course in Computational Number Theory (with Wagon), and Calculus: Graphical, Numerical, Algebraic (with Demana, Waits, Kennedy, & Boardman).

​David has chaired the MAA special interest group, Teaching Advanced High School Mathematics as well as the AP Calculus Development Committee and has served as Director of the FIPSE-sponsored program Quantitative Methods for Public Policy and PI for two NSF-sponsored national studies of Calculus: Characteristics of Successful Programs in College Calculus (NSF #0910240) and Progress through Calculus (NSF #1430540).

A native of Pennsylvania, David lives in Saint Paul, Minnesota.

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David Burney

Professor of Conservation Paleobiology, National Tropical Botanical Garden, and Adjunct Professor, University of Hawaii
Dr. David A. Burney is a paleoecologist and conservation biologist who has worked extensively in Africa as well as Hawaii, Madagascar, and other tropical islands. His research has focused on past environments, fire history, and natural disasters. He has over a half century of practical experience in conservation, starting out as a park ranger and including serving as a technical consultant for government projects and international programs.

Prior to moving to Kaua`i he was a professor at Fordham University in New York. He received an M.Sc. in conservation biology from the University of Nairobi (Kenya) and a Ph.D. in zoology with a minor in botany from Duke University. He is the author of over 100 scientific articles and monographs, many concerning pollen and other airborne particulates, sedimentary deposits, and the processes of extinction and environmental change.

In 2006 he was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship to write a book on his work at Makauwahi Cave on Kaua`i, published by Yale Press (Back to the Future in the Caves of Kaua`i). His research has been featured on National Geographic Television, Discovery Channel, Hawaii Public Television, NOVA, and National Public Radio, and he holds the honorary title of National Geographic Explorer.

With his wife Lida Pigott Burney, he established the Makauwahi Cave Reserve on Kaua`i to protect, research, and restore Hawaii’s richest fossil and archaeological site and reestablish thousands of native plants on the surrounding landscape. He currently holds the emeritus position of professor of conservation paleobiology at the National Tropical Botanical Garden, where he served as director of conservation from 2004 until 2012. His studies of tsunami deposits, fire history, and climate change have contributed to discussions and practical steps toward safer communities and healthier ecosystems.

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David Cason

I have over thirty years of teaching experience at the secondary and post-secondary level. I have expertise in Southern History, Civil Rights and Social Justice, and Political Socialization.

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David Chavalarias

Research director, Centre d’Analyses de Mathématiques Sociales (CAMS), Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (EHESS), Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS)
David Chavalarias is Director of Research at the CNRS lab Center for Social Analysis and Mathematics (CAMS) and is the head of the Complex Systems Institute of Paris Ile-de-France (CNRS, ISC-PIF – http://iscpif.fr). He studies the social and cognitive dynamics, both from the modeling and data-mining perspective, with an interdisciplinary approach grounded in cognitive and complex systems sciences. His work on science evolution features new methods for the reconstruction of science dynamics from academic productions, as well as models of collective dynamics of scientific discovery. He also has contributed to the development of several macroscopes and visualization tools for mapping knowledge dynamics from large corpora : academic digital repositories, online media or press.

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David Cheresh

Professor of Pathology, University of California, San Diego
Dr. Cheresh is a Distinguished Professor and Vice Chair in the Department of Pathology at UC San Diego, and a member of the UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center.

Dr. Cheresh earned his PhD in Immunology at the University of Miami in 1982.

Prior to relocating his laboratory to UCSD in 2005, Dr. Cheresh was a professor in the Departments of Immunology and Vascular Biology at The Scripps Research Institute.

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David Cingranelli

Professor of Political Science and Co-Director of the Human Rights Institute, Binghamton University, State University of New York
David Cingranelli is a Professor of Political Science at Binghamton University, SUNY. He has written widely on human rights, democracy, conflict, and ethics and foreign policy. His 2007 book with Rodwan Abouharb, "Human Rights and Structural Adjustment," (Cambridge University Press) demonstrated the negative human rights impacts of World Bank and IMF program lending in developing countries. He is a former President of the Human Rights Section of the American Political Science Association. Until 2012, he served as the co-director of the Cingranelli and Richards (CIRI) Human Rights Data Project, the largest and most widely used human rights data set in the world. Presently, he his colleagues are working in collaboration with the United States Political Instability Task Force on a successor to the CIRI project, which will be called the “C-RIGHTS” data project. He currently serves as the Co-director of the Binghamton University Human Rights Institute.

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David Cliff

Professor of Occupational Health and Safety in Mining, The University of Queensland
David Cliff was appointed Professor of Occupational Health and Safety in Mining and Director of MISHC in 2011. His primary role is providing education, applied research and consulting in health and safety in the mining and minerals processing industry. He has been at MISHC over twelve years.

Previously David was the Safety and Health Adviser to the Queensland Mining Council, and prior to that Manager of Mining Research at the Safety In Mines Testing and Research Station. In these capacities he has provided expert assistance in the areas of health and safety to the mining industry for over twenty three years. He has particular expertise in emergency preparedness, gas analysis, spontaneous combustion, fires and explosions, including providing expert testimony to the Moura No,2 Warden’s inquiry and the Pike River Royal Commission. In recent times he has also devoted a lot of energy to fitness for duty issues particularly fatigue management. He has been a member of the organising committee for the level one emergency exercises in Queensland underground coal mines since their inception in 1998. He has also attended or provided assistance in over 30 incidents at mines.

David has also extensive experience in providing training and education in OHS in mining to in many countries.

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David Cobham

David Cobham is Professor of Economics. His main research area has been UK monetary policy, but he also has substantial research interests in European monetary integration, central bank independence, financial systems and Middle Eastern economies. Most recently he has worked on the issue of monetary policy and asset prices, on the Bank of England's reaction function, on quantitative easing and on the classification of monetary policy frameworks.

He is an active member of the committee of the Money, Macro and Finance Research Group, and Associate Editor of the Review of Middle East Economics and Finance. He has been Houblon-Norman Research Fellow at the Bank of England in 1987, and again in 2001. He was a member of the organising committee of a Norges Bank conference on Inflation Targeting Twenty Years On (June 2009), and member of the organising committee of a conference on 'The Euro Area and the Financial Crisis' , hosted by the National Bank of Slovakia (September 2010).

He organised a conference on 'Monetary policy before, during and after the crisis', sponsored by SIRE and the MMF, at Heriot-Watt University in September 2011. Papers from the conference were published in a special issue of Oxford Economic Papers (April 2013).

He co-edited, with Chris Adam and Ken Mayhew, an issue of the Oxford Review of Economic Policy (spring 2013) on 'The economic record of the Labour government, 1997-2010'.

He organised a conference on 'Monetary analysis and monetary policy frameworks' in Edinburgh in April 2014, papers from which appeared in a special issue of The Manchester School, May 2015.

He organised with Geore Bratsiotis a seminar on 'German macro: how it's different and why that matters' in Heriot-Watt, December 2015 (papers to be published shortly).

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David Cockayne

Senior Lecturer: University of Huddersfield Business School, University of Huddersfield

BA(Hons), MSc (Distinction), PGCHE, FHEA

Senior lecturer at University of Huddersfield Business School specialising in business marketing and brand experience management. Specific research interests include the role of digital technology in marketing innovation, and the organisation of marketing practice. I am also interested in the political economy of sport business management at an international level, with specific interest toward the changing consumer culture in 21st century China.

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David Cooper1

PhD Candidate, UNSW Sydney

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David Cullen

Professor of Bioanalytical Technology, Cranfield University
David Cullen graduated with a BSc in Biochemistry from the University of East Anglia and obtained his PhD in Biosensor Technology from the University of Cambridge. He continued postdoctoral studies in the same group before joining Cranfield University in 1994, initially as a lecturer in the area of Biophysics and Biosensors. Since 2008 he has been Professor of Bioanalytical Technology.

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David DeGraff

Associate Professor of Pathology, Penn State
My goal is to leverage my training and education in urologic oncology and translational research to facilitate discovery.

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David Delgado Shorter

Professor of World Arts and Cultures/Dance, University of California, Los Angeles
Dr. David Shorter is a tenured professor at UCLA, where he has taught “Aliens, Psychics, and Ghosts” for over a decade. He has been researching how science helps and doesn’t help us understand the paranormal. He is also the Director of the Archive of Healing, having been raised by a curandera, and learning with healers in Indigenous communities as well as in Japan. Most recently, Dr. Shorter has been named the Editor in Chief for the American Indian Culture and Research Journal, a leading scholarly journal in the field of Indigenous Studies. He has published scholarly essays in anthropology, Indigenous Studies, and the history of the sciences. He has produced films, created digital content, and curated art exhibits.

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David Dunning

His research focuses on the psychology underlying human misbelief. In his most widely-cited work, he showed that people tend to hold flattering opinions of their competence, character, and prospects that cannot be justified from objective evidence—a phenomenon that carries many implications for health, education, the workplace, and economic exchange. He also examines how many of these same processes also injure judgments made by groups.

Dunning’s other research focuses on decision-making in various settings. In work on economic games, he explores how choices commonly presumed to be economic in nature actually hinge more on psychological factors, such as social norms and emotion. In particular, he documents that people trust complete strangers in situations in which the economic analysis would suggest no trust whatsoever.

Finally, Dunning explores how people’s preferences and wishes distort their judgements and conclusions. In past work, he has shown how the influence of motivated reasoning extends even down to shape perceptual experience, such as vision and hearing.

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David Durrheim

Professor of Public Health Medicine, University of Newcastle
In the past decade, David has served as an expert adviser and consultant to a number of World Health Organization (WHO), regional and national health programmes in the African and Pacific Regions. He also served as the Director of a World Health Organization Collaborating Centre in Vectorborne Diseases.

David's research interests include: novel infectious disease surveillance methods, control of zoonotic diseases and strategies for reducing inequity in public health service delivery. He has over 200 peer-reviewed publications, and has published several scientific monographs and chapters in leading public health texts.

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David Dyzenhaus

Professor of Law and Philosophy, University of Toronto
David Dyzenhaus is a professor of Law and Philosophy at the University of Toronto, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and a Corresponding Fellow of the British Academy. He holds the Albert Abel Chair of Law and was appointed in 2015 to the rank of University Professor. He has taught in South Africa, England, Canada, Singapore, New Zealand, Hungary, Mexico and the USA. He holds a doctorate from Oxford University and law and undergraduate degrees from the University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa. In 2002, he was the Law Foundation Visiting Fellow in the Faculty of Law, University of Auckland. In 2005-06 he was Herbert Smith Visiting Professor in the Cambridge Law Faculty and a Senior Scholar of Pembroke College, Cambridge. In 2014-15, he was the Arthur Goodhart Visiting Professor in Legal Science in Cambridge. In 2016-17, he was a Fellow of the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin. In 2020-21, he was a Guggenheim Fellow and a Visiting Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford.

Professor Dyzenhaus is the author of Hard Cases in Wicked Legal Systems: South African Law in the Perspective of Legal Philosophy (now in its second edition), Legality and Legitimacy: Carl Schmitt, Hans Kelsen, and Hermann Heller in Weimar, and Judging the Judges, Judging Ourselves: Truth, Reconciliation and the Apartheid Legal Order. He has edited and co-edited several collections of essays. In 2004 he gave the JC Smuts Memorial Lectures to the Faculty of Law, Cambridge University. These were published by Cambridge University Press in 2006 as The Constitution of Law: Legality in a Time of Emergency. He is editor of the University of Toronto Law Journal and co-editor of the series Cambridge Studies in Constitutional Law. His most recent book is The Long Arc of Legality: Hobbes, Kelsen, Hart (Cambridge, 2022).

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David E. Clementson

PhD Candidate in the School of Communication, The Ohio State University

David Clementson is a PhD Candidate in the School of Communication at The Ohio State University. He has been published in Presidential Studies Quarterly, the Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Mass Communication and Society, the Journal of Political Marketing, the International Journal of Sport Communication, the Encyclopedia of Deception, and the Encyclopedia of Politics and Social Media. Before grad school he worked professionally for nearly a decade in strategic communication, politics, and public relations. He was a political campaign manager and strategist (for successful Democrats and Republicans), the press secretary and director of communications for state attorneys general, a journalist (for newspapers and magazines), and a public relations director.

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David Edwards

Professor, University of Cambridge
I am interested in the conservation of tropical forests and biodiversity. We use intensive field study, remote sensing, global mapping, land-use modelling, and environmental economics to tackle key questions in tropical forest ecology and conservation, with a focus on issues of global policy significance. I am particularly interested in understanding the most effective ways of managing primary forest, selective logging, restoration, farming, and wildlife trade to enhance biodiversity protection and the delivery of associated ecosystem functions and services. I work closely with conservation practitioners, government, and industry in developing our research and translating it into applied solutions.

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David Eiser

David Eiser is a Research Fellow in Economics at the University of Stirling, and at the Centre on Constitutional Change.

He specialises in the economics of constitutional change, regional economics, and labour markets.

David has published extensively on the economics of devolution in the UK, particularly in regard to fiscal issues in Scotland. He co-edited work on the economics of Scottish independence published by the Scottish Economic Society, and has published a number of papers on inequality in Scotland. David has given evidence to various Scottish Parliament Committees, and published research for the Scottish Government on issues including, the integration of employment and skills services, broadband rollout, and the Commonwealth Games.

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David Ekserdjian

Professor of History of Art and Film, University of Leicester
Formerly a Fellow of Balliol and Corpus Christi, Oxford, since 2004 I have taught at the University of Leicester, but I spent the years 1991 to 1997 working for Christie's and was Editor of Apollo magazine from 1997 to 2004. Among my most recent books are The Italian Renaissance Altarpiece: Between Icon and Narrative (2021) and Albrecht Dürer: Art and Autobiography (2023). I have also organised or co-organised numerous exhibitions and written their catalogues, including Bronze (2012) at the Royal Academy and - with Tom Henry - Raphael (2022) at the National Gallery, and served as a Trustee of the National Gallery, Tate, and Sir John Soane's Museum. In 2017-18, I was the Slade Professor of Fine Art at the University of Oxford.

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David Farrell

Professor Farrell is a member of the Royal Irish Academy. He is a specialist in the study of parties, elections, electoral systems and members of parliament. His current research focuses on the role of deliberation in constitutional reform processes. In 2012 he was elected as President of the Political Studies Association of Ireland.

In 2013 he was elected as Speaker of the Council of the European Consortium for Political Research. Professor Farrell is founding co-editor of Party Politics. Prior to his move to Dublin, Professor Farrell was professor and head of Social Sciences at the University of Manchester.

His principal research interests are elections, electoral systems, political parties, deliberation, and the representative role of members of parliament

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David Fisman

Professor in the Division of Epidemiology, University of Toronto
I am a Professor in the Division of Epidemiology. I am a Full Member of the School of Graduate Studies. I also have cross-appointments at the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation and the Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine. I serve as a Consultant in Infectious Diseases at the University Health Network.

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David Gervais

Biologiste Forestier, Conseil des Innus de Pessamit

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David Gilchrist

Director of the Curtin Not-for-profit Initiative & Author of the National Disability Costing and Pricing Framework, Curtin University

David Gilchrist is director of Curtin University's Curtin Not-for-profit Initiative. He is an accountant and an historian with over twenty years experience in the Not-for-profit and charitable sector in Australia and the UK. David has worked in government, not-for-profits and in commerce and researches and writes on governance, sustainability, outcomes measurement, accountability and reporting in the public and not-for-profit sectors.

Currently David is chairman of Nulsen Disability Services, chairman of the Kimberley Individual and Family Support Association, he sits on the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Advisory Board and on the national Not-for-profit committee of Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand. He is also a member of the Australian Accounting Standards Board Academic Advisory Panel.

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David Giles

Senior lecturer in Anthropology, Deakin University

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David Girling

Associate Professor and Director of Research Communication in the School of Global Development, University of East Anglia
David Girling is an Associate Professor and Director of Research Communication in the School of Global Development (DEV).

He is a Chartered Marketer with over 25 years marketing and communications experience in the public and non-profit sector. David has been actively involved on a number of committees and judging panels including The Chartered Institute of Marketing Higher Education Group, The Chartered Institute of Marketing Charity Group, HEIST Awards for Marketing Excellence and the Rusty/Golden Radiator awards for online videos promoting best practice in development communication. His interests are multidisciplinary, but has particular expertise in strategic marketing, communications, PR, branding, digital and social media.

David's research focuses on two main areas: social media for development and humanitarian communication. He is particularly interested in how imagery is used in development communications and led on a research study of visual communication in six African countries. His research Who Owns the Story, involves live financial testing of charity versus participant led storytelling in fundraising.

He regularly tweet about issues in social media and international development.

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David Glance

Associate Professor David Glance is the Director of the UWA Centre for Software Practice, a UWA research and development centre.

Originally a physiologist working in the area of vascular control mechanisms in pregnancy, Professor Glance subsequently worked in the software industry for over 20 years before spending the last 10 years at UWA. The UWA CSP has developed the eHealth platform MMEx which has been used to provide electronic patient management in WA and other parts of Australia. Professor Glance's research interests are in health informatics, public health and software engineering.

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David Grayden

Professor of Electrical & Electronic Engineering, University of Melbourne

Professor David Grayden is Deputy Head (Academic) of the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering at The University of Melbourne.

His main research interests are in understanding how the brain processes information and how best to present information to the brain using medical bionics, such as the bionic ear and bionic eye. He is also conducting research in epileptic seizure prediction and electrical stimulation to prevent or stop epileptic seizures.

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David Grummitt

Staff Tutor in History, The Open University
I am military historian who has published extensively on warfare in the late Middle Ages (particularly on the Wars of the Roses) but also on modern armoured warfare. I am the author of books on both the M1 Abrams and the Leopard 2 tanks.

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David Hansen

CEO, Australian e-Health Research Centre, CSIRO
David Hansen is CEO of the Australian e-Health Research Centre, a joint venture between the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) and Queensland Health. David leads a research program of over 65 scientists and engineers developing information and communication technologies. The e-Health research program tackles the challenges of the healthcare system across Data, Diagnosis and Services.

Prior to joining CSIRO, David worked for LION bioscience Ltd in the UK, developing genomic data and tool integration software.

David is also the Chair of the Board of the Health Informatics Society of Australia (HISA) and played a key role in initiatives such as the introduction of the Certified Health Informatician Australia (CHIA) program and the annual Health Informatics Conference (HIC) and Big Data conferences.

David is passionate about the role of information and communication technologies in health care and the role of Health Informatics professionals in developing a safe, high quality efficient and sustainable healthcare system in Australia.

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David Hayward

Emeritus Professor of Public Policy, RMIT University
David is Emeritus Professor of Public Policy and the Social Economy at RMIT University

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David Hodgkinson

I am a partner with aviation and aerospace law firm HodgkinsonJohnston. I am also an associate professor in the Law School at the University of Western Australia, and executive director of EcoCarbon (a UNFCCC-accredited NGO) Displacement.

My areas of research are aviation law and climate change.

In terms of aviation, I was formerly Director of Legal Services at IATA (the organisation of the world's airlines) in Montreal, and edited the book 'Essential Documents on International Air Carrier Liability.'

In terms of climate change, I led an international project team which drafted the Peninsula Principles on Climate Displacement. I am also the coauthor of the leading text on climate change law in Australia, 'Global Climate Change: Australian Law and Policy' (LexisNexis), and was the general editor of the looseleaf service, also published by LexisNexis, 'Climate Change Law and Policy in Australia.'

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David Holmes

Senior Lecturer, Communications and Media Studies, Monash University

David is a political analyst, social theorist and media scholar. He completed a major in Media Studies at Swinburne University, a BA (Hons) in Politics and Social Theory and a PhD in Social Theory (Department of the History and Philosophy of Science) from the University of Melbourne, where he was awarded the Dwight prize for political science.

He is author or editor of four books in the sociology of communications including: Virtual Politics: Identity and Community in Cyberspace (Sage 1997) and Virtual Globalisation: Virtual Spaces, Tourist Spaces (Routledge 2001), Communication Theory: Media, Technology and Society (Sage 2005) and a Key Concepts in Media and Communications (Sage 2011) co-authored with Paul Jones (UNSW) Over eleven years, he has also co-authored four editions of an analysis of Australian society: Australian sociology (2003, 2007 and 2011, 2014) with Roberta Julian and Katie Hughes. For the last two editions he has written a new chapter on the sociology of climate change.

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David Homewood

Urology Research Registrar, Western Health, Melbourne Health

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