Menu

Search

Dennis V. Perepelitsa

Associate Professor of Physics, University of Colorado Boulder
The experimental nuclear physics group at the University of Colorado studies the properties of the strong nuclear interaction, one of the four fundamental forces, under extreme conditions. When ordinary nuclear matter is subjected to sufficiently high temperatures and densities, the sub-atomic quark and gluon particles which comprise it become free and form a quark-gluon plasma (QGP). In the first few microseconds after the Big Bang, all the quarks and gluons which would eventually condense into the nuclear matter we see around us existed in a QGP phase. Thus, studying this phase of matter allows us to explore the properties of the Early Universe. We can create these high-temperature, high-density conditions at particle colliders around the world such as at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) or Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). In these machines, large nuclei (called heavy ions) are accelerated to energies equal to several hundred or thousand times their rest mass and brought into a head-on collision, creating a droplet of primordial QGP.

Our group is involved in the Heavy Ions program at the ATLAS Experiment at the LHC, situated at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. The LHC collides pairs of nuclei and nuclei with protons at TeV-scale energies, producing the hottest matter ever made on Earth (over five trillion Kelvin). Within ATLAS, we participate in operational data-taking at the LHC and in offline data analysis. In addition, we are involved in building the next-generation collider detector for nuclear physics, the sPHENIX Experiment at RHIC, situated at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Long Island, NY. RHIC is a versatile machine which can collide a variety of nuclear species and investigate the QGP under conditions closer to the phase transition temperature than the LHC. Our work for sPHENIX includes experimental beam tests of calorimeters, development the electronic trigger system, and simulations work.

My particular research areas are: (1) understanding how high-energy quarks and gluons lose energy as the traverse the QGP using reconstructed jet, electroweak, and heavy flavor probes; (2) finding the limiting system size or conditions under which traditional signatures of QGP formation appear or disappear; and (3) exploring the momentum and spatial structure of nuclei in small collision systems where a sizable region of QGP is not expected to be formed.

  More

Less

Dennis W. Jansen

Professor of Economics and Director of the Private Enterprise Research Center, Texas A&M University
Dr. Dennis Jansen is a Professor of Economics and Director of the Private Enterprise Research Center at Texas A&M University and is currently the Mary Julia and George R. Jordan Jr. Professor of Public Policy in Economics. He received his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and his undergraduate degree in economics and mathematics from St. Louis University. His research focuses on macroeconomics, financial economics, forecasting, and the economics of education. He has received grants from the National Science Foundation and has worked for the Texas Education Agency to study the Texas school finance formula, and to evaluate both the Texas Educator Excellence Grant program and the Texas District Award for Teacher Excellence program. Professor Jansen was a Fulbright Scholar in 2008, lecturing and conducting research in Ireland. At Texas A&M University Dr. Jansen has served as Department Head, Director of Graduate Programs, and Director of Undergraduate Programs. He has also held research or teaching positions at the National University of Ireland-Galway, the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, Indiana University-Bloomington, North Carolina State University, Korea University, Southwest University of Finance and Economics (China), Erasmus University Rotterdam, Catholic University Leuven, and Maastricht University.

  More

Less

Deondre Smiles

Assistant Professor of Geography, University of Victoria
Deondre Smiles currently serves as an Assistant Professor of Geography. He is Black/Ojibwe/settler, and is a citizen of the Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe. Smiles is a geographer whose research interests are multifaceted, including Indigenous geographies/epistemologies, human-environmental interaction, political ecology, and tribal cultural resource preservation/protection. He currently serves as the Chair of the Indigenous Peoples Specialty Group of the American Association of Geographers (AAG); he is also a member of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association (NAISA), and the Canadian Association of Geographers. (CAG). He also serves as a member of the editorial board of the journal Native American and Indigenous Studies.

  More

Less

Derek Arnold

Professor, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland
Derek Arnold is a sensory neuroscientist who has published >100 papers, often in some of the world's most prestigious scientific outlets. He has specific research interests in Aphantasia - commonly known as mind blindness, Visual Perception and Time Perception.

  More

Less

Derek Clinger

Senior Staff Attorney, State Democracy Research Initiative, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Derek is a Senior Staff Attorney with the State Democracy Research Initiative at the University of Wisconsin Law School.

Before joining the Initiative, Derek was a partner at the law firm of McTigue Colombo & Clinger in Columbus, Ohio, where his practice focused on federal, state, and local election laws, campaign finance, statewide and local ballot initiatives and referenda, voting rights, ballot access, and government transparency.

Derek received his bachelor's degree in Middle East studies and political science and his law degree from the Ohio State University. While in law school, he was an intern with the ACLU Voting Rights Project and the Campaign Legal Center.

Before practicing law, Derek worked in the communications department of the Ohio Secretary of State's office and also worked for several federal, state, and local political campaigns in Ohio.

  More

Less

Derek Epp

Assistant professor in the Department of Government, The University of Texas at Austin
Derek Epp is an assistant professor in the Department of Government. He joined the faculty in 2017 from Dartmouth College where he was a postdoc within the Nelson A. Rockefeller Center. In May 2015, he received his Ph.D. in American Politics with a minor in Public Policy from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His dissertation is titled Information Processing and the Instability of Political Outcomes and he currently has a book expanding on themes from his dissertation forthcoming with the University of Chicago Press. He graduated from the University of Maryland, College Park in 2008 with a bachelor's in Political Science.

His research agenda focuses on policy change, asking why some policies persist - remaining the status quo for decades - while others undergo frequent adjustments. In particular, he is interested in measuring the capacity of institutions to attend to political information and then tracking the allocation of that attention across issues: what issues receive attention, for how long, and to what effect. He also study criminal justice, with a particular focus on racial patterns in police traffic stops.

  More

Less

Derek Hrynyshyn

Contract Faculty, Communication & Media Studies, York University, Canada
Derek Hrynyshyn teaches in the Deparment of Politics and the Department of Communication Studies at York University. He is author of Limits of the Digital Revolution (Praeger 2017).

  More

Less

Derek Lief

PhD Student/Researcher, University of Michigan
My research on comparative politics in the Middle East follows three main streams. First, I am interested in how discriminatory legislation against ethnic minorities affects loyalty to the state. Second, I research how group economic decisions impact national identity. Finally, I consider how business networks impact firm performance, national identity, and development.

I hold a BA in History from Haverford College and a MPP and MA in Middle Eastern and North African Studies, both from the University of Michigan.

  More

Less

Derek Matravers

Professor of Philosophy, The Open University
Derek Matravers is Professor of Philosophy at The Open University and a Fellow of Churchill College, Cambridge. He has written Art and Emotion (OUP, 1998), Introducing Philosophy of Art: Eight Case Studies (Routledge, 2013); Fiction and Narrative (OUP, 2014); and Empathy (Polity, 2017). He is the author of numerous articles in aesthetics, ethics, and the philosophy of mind. He edits, with Paloma Atencia-Linares, The British Journal of Aesthetics.

Between 2017 and 2020 he directed, with Helen Frowe, the UK Government funded project, Heritage in War. A monograph detailing the findings of this project is due out next year: Stones and Lives: The Ethics of Protecting Heritage in War (OUP, 2024).

  More

Less

Derek Tsang

Associate Professor, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto
Dr. Derek Tsang is a radiation oncologist at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre in Toronto, Canada. He is an Associate Professor in the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Toronto. He completed his medical training at Queen’s University, followed by residency at the University of Toronto. He obtained fellowship training in paediatric radiation oncology at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, and has a Masters’ degree in clinical epidemiology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Dr. Tsang joined the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre in 2017, where he is a member of the paediatric and adult central nervous system (CNS) tumour site groups.

  More

Less

Derek Wilding

Research Fellow, Faculty of Law/Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, University of Technology Sydney

I have a law degree from UQ and a PhD in media studies from QUT. Previous positions include Executive Director of the Australian Press Council, Manager at the Australian Communications and Media Authority, and Director of the Communications Law Centre at UNSW.

  More

Less

Derek H. Alderman

Professor of Geography, University of Tennessee
Derek H. Alderman is Professor of Geography and Betty Lynn Hendrickson Professor of Social Science at the University of Tennessee. He is a past President of the American Association of Geographers (2017-18) and founder of Tourism RESET, an interdisciplinary and multi-university initiative devoted to analyzing and challenging historical and contemporary social injustices in travel, tourism, and mobility.

Dr. Alderman’s specialties include race, public memory, civil rights, heritage tourism, counter-mapping, and critical place name study—all within the context of the African-American struggle for social and spatial justice. He is the author of over 150 articles, book chapters, and other essays along with the award-winning book (with Owen Dwyer), Civil Rights Memorials and the Geography of Memory. He is co-editor (with Reuben Rose-Redwood and Maoz Azaryahu) entitled The Political Life of Urban Streetscapes: Naming, Politics, and Place (Routledge) and co-author of Remembering Enslavement: Reassembling the Southern Plantation Museum (UGA Press).

Dr. Alderman's scholarship advances our understanding of the role of named places in struggles over civil rights, race, memory, and public space in America. He is a nationally recognized authority on the topic of street naming, especially for Martin Luther King Jr. He also explores, more broadly, place names as cultural arenas for reckoning with the histories and ongoing legacies of racism and as tools for promoting reconciliation, anti-racist and decolonial education, and more socially just landscapes. In 2022, Dr. Alderman was appointed by Secretary Deb Haaland to serve on the Department of Interior's Advisory Committee on Reconciliation in American Place Names.

Committed to publicly engaged scholarship, Dr. Alderman frequently uses his research to engage and inform the news media, government officials, community activists and organizations, and the broader public. He has been interviewed or quoted over 250 times in print, radio and television media outlets, including CNN, MSNBC, New York Times, CityLab, Washington Post, USA Today, The Guardian, and BBC Radio News. He is the recipient of a Distinguished Career Award from the Ethnic Geography Specialty Group of the AAG, a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Southeastern Division of the AAG, and a recently elected Fellow of the American Association of Geographers..

Dr. Alderman's recent work includes a NSF-funded project that examines the contested place of discussions of slavery at plantation museums in the southeastern United States, with an emphasis on reforming the way these institutions represent racism, memory, and African American identity. He is also involved a NSF-funded project that examines the role of counter-mapping, geospatial intelligence, and opposition research within SNCC, the important 1960s civil rights organization. In 2022, Dr. Alderman co-directed a National Endowment of Humanities-funded summer training institute for K-12 educators on the role of geographic mobility in the African American Freedom Struggle.

  More

Less

Derek H. Kiernan-Johnson

Teaching Professor of Law, University of Colorado Boulder
Derek Kiernan-Johnson studies the ethics of using narrative and visual rhetoric in legal persuasion and how judges make decisions and express them in writing. He teaches students how to dissect and synthesize law and fact, how to express and critique legal analysis and argumentation, and how to understand the American judicial opinion in historical and comparative context.

Derek went to public schools in Boulder, Colorado, and to college at Princeton University. At Princeton, he studied religion, dramatic performance, and music, writing Experiencing Toxcatl: an Ixiptla's Perspective (1996), a study of an Aztec sacrifice from the sacrificee's viewpoint, and Durch Sühn und Buß der Gnade Heil: Suffering and Salvation in the Operas of Richard Wagner (1997). He then studied English cathedral architecture at Wadham College at Oxford University before returning for law school at the University of Michigan. His studies at Michigan focused on constitutional law, education law, and meaning and performance in the law, the last interest of which culminated in Meaning in Miranda (1999).

After law school Derek returned to Colorado to clerk for Justice Michael L. Bender of the Colorado Supreme Court. He practiced law for six years at Caplan and Earnest, LLC, representing public-school clients in general-counsel, transactional, and litigation settings. Derek joined the CU Law faculty in 2007.

Derek enjoys spending time with his family, following UK & European soccer, hiking, cooking, playing billiards, enjoying beverages such as tea, beer, wine, and distillates, and identifying & tracking things like birds, cultural trends, and mammals.

  More

Less

Deren Pillay

Researcher and Advanced Trainee in Public Health Medicine, Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania
Deren Pillay is a Public Health Medicine Advanced Trainee at the Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania. Deren works in the Environmental Health Research Group at Menzies researching the human health impacts of air pollution and is a member of the research translation subcommittee at the NHMRC Centre for Safe Air.

  More

Less

Derick Blaauw

School of Economic Sciences, North-West University
Derick Blaauw received the Doctor Commercii (D-Com) degree in economics from the University of Johannesburg (UJ) in 2010. He is currently professor in the School of Economic Sciences at the North-West University (Potchefstroom Campus). Prior to taking up this position, he lectured economics on a full-time basis at the University of Johannesburg (UJ), Rand Afrikaans University (RAU) and at the Soweto and Bloemfontein Campuses of Vista University. He also lectured on a part-time basis at the University of the Free State (UFS) and Monash South Africa. His research interests are mainly in the field of labour and development economics. His current work focusses on the precarious forms of work and the socio-economic dynamics of vulnerable groups in the informal economy, such as car guards, day labourers, street traders and waste pickers. He has authored and co-authored several articles in respected accredited international and national journals and regularly presents papers at national and international conferences and symposia.

  More

Less

Derina Johnson

Postdoctoral Researcher, Trinity College Dublin, Trinity College Dublin

Prior to commencing her PhD under the supervision of Professor Robbie Gilligan at Trinity College Dublin's School of Social Work and Social Policy, Derina spent three years living on the Thailand-Myanmar border. There she collaborated with refugee and migrant groups on culturally appropriate and sustainable psychosocial care programmes for children and youth. Prior to this Derina ran her own play therapy practice in Dublin. Derina obtained her Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Psychology from University College Dublin, and studied Play Therapy and Psychotherapy at the Children’s Therapy Centre with Eileen Prendiville.

Derina's PhD research explored the lives of young people growing up in legal and social marginalisation on the Thailand-Myanmar border. Drawing from 11 months' fieldwork, the research provides a glimpse into the realities of growing up in displacement and lack of documentation; as an “illegal migrant”, facing restricted mobility, limited access to education and other essential services, narrow migrant labour market demands, and everyday vulnerability to exploitation and poverty.

The research revealed nuanced insights into the legal and social precarity which characterises the young people's lifeworlds and ways of being in the world, and the normalisation of suffering and struggle in the quest to create a better future for them and their families. Within this extreme adversity, optimism and pragmatism, resistance and endurance, determination and flexibility emerged as key facets of the young people’s engagement in their worlds, as well as their agency and resilience in the face of certain uncertainty.,

Derina continues to work at Trinity College Dublin, as a postdoctoral researcher at the School of Medicine (Paediatrics) and Trinity Research in Childhood Centre, and as project manager of the Horizon 2020 funded energy efficiency socio-economic research project CONSEED.

  More

Less

Derya Ozdemir Kaya

Lecturer in Work and Organisation, University of Sussex
I am a Lecturer in Work and Organisation at University of Sussex Business School. My research interests are care, affective labour, future of work and psychosocial studies.

Previously, I held research posts in teams investigating care homes for older people in the UK, whistleblowing and domestic abuse services with funding from ESRC, ACCA and EIDHR.

My PhD thesis explores the ethos of love for one's job and affective labour drawing on a multi-sited psychosocial ethnography of the Turkish fine-dining sector. My first peer-reviewed article based on this study has been published by the prestigious Organisation Studies journal.

More on my research and impact work is available in my ORCID profile: https://orcid.org/my-orcid?orcid=0000-0002-0442-1289.

  More

Less

Des Freedman

Professor of Media and Communications, Goldsmiths, University of London

Des Freedman is interested in the relationship between media and power together with the political and economic contexts of media policymaking and regulation. He is an editor of the Sage journal 'Global Media and Communication' and was previously on the management committee of the COST programme A20, 'The Impact of the Internet on the Mass Media in Europe'. He was awarded an ESRC grant in 2005 to examine the dynamics of media policy-making in the UK and US. Des received an AHRC research leave award in 2006 to complete The Politics of Media Policy for Polity Press. He was a participant in the 'Spaces of the News' project in the Goldsmiths Leverhulme Media Research Centre, co-editor of the 'Unversities and Capitalism' section of openDemocracy, a member of the National Council of the Campaign for Press and Broadcasting Freedom and is the current chair of the Media Reform Coalition. He is currently writing a book on The Contradictions of Media Power for Bloomsbury (due 2014).

  More

Less

Des O'Rawe

Senior Lecturer in Film Studies, Queen's University Belfast
Des O’Rawe is a senior lecturer in Film Studies at Queen’s University Belfast, where he is also a Research Fellow at the Mitchell Institute for Conflict Transformation and Social Justice. He is interested in interdisciplinary approaches to the study of film and visual culture. His publications include: Regarding the Real: Cinema, Documentary, and the Visual Arts (Manchester University Press, 2016), and Post-Conflict Performance, Film and Visual Arts: Cities of Memory (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016).

  More

Less

Désirée Lim

Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Penn State
Désirée Lim is an assistant professor in the Department of Philosophy and a research associate in the Rock Ethics Institute. She completed her PhD in Philosophy at King’s College London and was a postdoctoral fellow at the McCoy Center for Ethics in Society at Stanford University. She was awarded the Association for Political Thought/Cambridge University Press Graduate Student’s Prize in 2015 and was a Norman Malcolm Fellow at Cornell University in 2014.

Désirée’s primary research and teaching interests lie in contemporary political philosophy, with a special focus on the concept of social or relational equality. What does it mean for people to relate to each other as equals, rather than superiors and inferiors? What exactly is wrong with being treated as an inferior? Furthermore, what kinds of political conditions are necessary to protect or enhance social equality, especially that of persons from historically disadvantaged groups? Applying these questions to a concrete realm, Desiree’s research investigates the demands that the social equality of non­citizens exacts on present-day migration and citizenship policy. She has argued that skill-selective immigration policies, which are generally regarded as morally neutral or even desirable, are actually damaging to the social equality of women and low skilled migrants. In more recent work, she has analyzed how the structure of private refugee sponsorship programs could be adapted to better preserve equal relationships between refugees and their sponsors.

Désirée is currently working on a book project, Immigration and Social Equality, which provides a distinctive social egalitarian critique of existing immigration practices. She also has strong interests in bio­ethics, feminist philosophy, and the critical philosophy of race.

  More

Less

Desné Masie

Visiting Researcher in International Political Economy, University of the Witwatersrand

Dr Desné Masie is visiting researcher at the Wits School of Governance in international political economy. Her research programme is primarily in international economics, covering financialisation, poverty and inequality, and African geopolitical economy. She is the co-host of the African Arguments podcast, an economics contributor to The Times, and an associate of the Democracy Works Foundation. She was a capital markets editor at the Financial Mail in Johannesburg, and the corporate relationship manager of the Royal African Society in London. She has had invited speaking engagements at the Frontline Club and the Institute of Commonwealth Studies in London. She holds a PhD in Finance (Edinburgh), MSc Finance & Financial Law (London), BA Hons (Unisa) and BA (Wits).

  More

Less

Detris Honora Adelabu

Clinical Professor of Applied Human Development, Boston University
Detris Honora Adelabu, Ed.D., Clinical Professor, Counseling Psychology and Applied Human Development, Boston University Wheelock College of Education and Human Development. Professor Adelabu is a student-centered, mission-driven educator committed to supporting and enhancing the academic development and life opportunities of first-generation, lower-income, and underrepresented Students of Color.

  More

Less

Devanshi Patel

Ph.D. Candidate in Clinical Psychology, Oklahoma State University
Devanshi Patel is a pre-internship graduate student in the Clinical program. Her research explores social perceptions of parenting and investigates stigma toward parents. Her thesis examines whether – and why – parents of children with "obesity" are stigmatized, and her future work will take intersectional approaches to understanding the role that body shape – along with target identity features (e.g., gender, race/ethnicity) – play in weight stigma.

  More

Less

Devasheesh Bhave

Associate Professor of Organisational Behaviour and Human Resources, Singapore Management University

  More

Less

Devin Griffiths

Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature, USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences
I write about the relation between literature, science, and the environment. My work has appeared in various academic journals, including Critical Inquiry, English Literary History, Studies in English Literature, Victorian Studies, and Book History. My first book, "The Age of Analogy: Science and Literature Between the Darwins," published in 2016 by the Johns Hopkins University Press, examines how historical novels shaped both the life sciences and the humanities, by means of a new comparative method that established our modern, relational understanding of history. It was shortlisted for the British Society of Literature and Science’s book prize, and was runner-up for the first book prize of the British Association for Romantic Studies. I am also the co-editor of "After Darwin: Literature, Theory, and Criticism in the Twenty-First Century," which was published by Cambridge University Press in 2022. The collection gathers an international roster of scholars to ask what Darwin’s writing offers future of literary scholarship and critical theory, as well as allied fields like history, art history, philosophy, gender studies, disability studies, the history of race, aesthetics, and ethics.

I am now working on a new book project, “The Ecology of Power,” which examines how Marxist and Darwinian philosophy offer alternative models for ecocriticism and the energy humanities.

  More

Less

Devon LaBat

Doctoral Candidate in Legal Psychology, Florida International University
Devon received her Bachelor of Science in Psychology and Criminal Justice from Iowa State University. She is pursuing a PhD in Legal Psychology at FIU. Her research interests broadly include jury decision making, interrogations and false confessions, and topics related to police psychology.

  More

Less

Dhanapal Govindarajulu

Postgraduate Researcher, Global Development Institute, University of Manchester
Dhanapal is a postgraduate researcher at the Global Development Institute, the university of Manchester. His current research is on examining social and ecological impacts of forest restoration in India.

He has worked as a researcher on forest ecology at the Indian Institute of Science and has conducted studies on forest management funded by international organisations like DFID, USAID and the Tenure Facility. His current research interests include policy analysis, spatial mapping of forests and exploring the causal relations between forestry investments, forests and livelihood.

His past research interests are also on urban ecology, climate change adaptation and resilience.

Dhanapal has a masters degree in Environment Management from the Forest Research Institute, Dehradun.

  More

Less

Dharani Hapangama

Professor of Gynaecology/Consultant Gynaecological Surgeon, University of Liverpool
Dharani K Hapangama is Professor of Gynaecology and the deputy head of the department of Women’s & Children’s health, with an interest in translational endometrial research. She is a Consultant Gynaecologist at Liverpool Women’s Hospital and her research group works on normal regeneration of the human endometrium, endometrial epithelial stem cells and telomerase/telomere biology in the context of endometrial disease such as 'endometriosis', peri-conceptional pathology and 'endometrial cancer'.

The human endometrium is a major theme underpinning my research. My group focuses on the understanding of three dimensional organisation, function, and regeneration of the human endometrium in order to address major unmet clinical needs in gynaecology. We therefore centre our research on pathologies related to menstrual related symptoms, fertility/ early pregnancy and endometrial cancer.

Our research is funded by MRC, Wellbeing of Women’s, NIHR and North West Cancer Research.

Our research utilises a wide range of research methodology that has been established in our labs and supported by our expert national and international collaborators including; complex 3D in vitro tissue culturing; endometrial histology, immunohistochemistry, immuno-fluorescence, in situ hybridisation, laser capture micro-dissection, NMR, mass-spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy, microarrays, RNA sequencing, imaging mass-spectroscopy as well as non-laboratory methods including systematic reviews and system biology.

  More

Less

Dheeraj Paramesha

Lecturer in Intelligence, Security and Policing, School of Criminology, University of Hull
I teach Intelligence, Policing, and Security in the Department of Criminology at Hull. I have a PhD in Intelligence Studies from the University of Leicester. I am the author of the book “India’s Intelligence Culture and Strategic Surprises: Spying for South Block” published by Routledge, which is the first academic work on India’s foreign intelligence culture.

Most of my research work is on strategic intelligence for foreign policymaking, military planning, and conflict management. I also wrote the state intelligence training manual of Karnataka state police and conducted training courses in counterterrorism and counter-radicalisation.

  More

Less

Di Rao

PhD Student, Political Science, University of Waterloo
Di is a PhD Student at the University of Waterloo. She/her has previously completed an Honours Bachelor of Arts and Masters of Arts in Political Science at the University of Toronto. Her research work focuses on the intersection of Charter rights, public administration, and race.

  More

Less

Diana Blaine

Professor of Gender and Sexuality Studies, USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences
Dr. Blaine teaches in the Department of Gender and Sexuality Studies where she also serves as Director of Undergradute Studies. Her research and publications examine representations of death in media, including analysis of corpses in advertising, literature, news, films and television. Besides thanatology, Blaine studies other representations of gender and the body, including abortion, yoga, and celebrity. For better or worse, she sees everything through the lens of mortality.

  More

Less

Diana Ibanez-Tirado

Senior Lecturer in Anthropology, University of Sussex
Diana is a social anthropologist with a wide range of regional and linguistic expertise, and an inter-disciplinary approach. She obtained a PhD and an MA in social anthropology from SOAS, University of London, a BA in International Relations (UNAM), and an MA in Middle East Studies with Arabic Language (El Colegio de Mexico), and diplomas in Russian Language and Culture from UNAM and the Pushkin State Russian Institute in Moscow.

Diana’s early research documented how people in southern Tajikistan experience time, and then she worked on theorising different forms of transnational mobility and migration in Asia. Based on fieldwork conducted in China, Ukraine, Russia, Turkey and Tajikistan, her work with Russian and Persian speaking traders has been published in the journals Ethnography; Current Sociology; Central Asian Survey, History and Anthropology, and the Cambridge Journal of Anthropology.

From her research on temporality, and then mobility and trade, Diana developed an interest in the journeys people embark upon when searching for healing, medical treatments, and management of ill health. Since 2023, she has been investigating the journeys that Britons follow to seek dental services in Turkey, a phenomenon related to the "crisis" of NHS dentistry in the UK.

  More

Less

Diana Kadouch

Praticien Hospitalier, Hôpital Bichat, Service de Diabétologie-Nutrition, AP-HP, Chargée de cours au sein du DU de nutrition, Université Paris Cité

  More

Less

Diana Mok

Associate Professor of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Western University
My research interests are broadly defined in the realm of real estate and urban economics, with a focus on housing and urban development. Most of my research studies have been applied, empirical studies of urban phenomena drawn from existing theories, and I often adopt a spatial lens to study my research questions. Specifically, my research has evolved and developed around three themes, intertwined, and with a spatial focus: risk, real estate, and urban growth. I seek to understand the interrelatedness among risk, the real estate market, and how the real estate market affects people’s economic activities in everyday life.

  More

Less

Diana Mok

Associate Professor of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Western University
My research interests are broadly defined in the realm of real estate and urban economics, with a focus on housing and urban development. Most of my research studies have been applied, empirical studies of urban phenomena drawn from existing theories, and I often adopt a spatial lens to study my research questions. Specifically, my research has evolved and developed around three themes, intertwined, and with a spatial focus: risk, real estate, and urban growth. I seek to understand the interrelatedness among risk, the real estate market, and how the real estate market affects people’s economic activities in everyday life.

  More

Less

  11 12 13 14 15 
  • Market Data
Close

Welcome to EconoTimes

Sign up for daily updates for the most important
stories unfolding in the global economy.