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David Pye

Scientific Director of the Kidscan Childrens Cancer Research Charity, University of Salford

I am currently the scientific director of the children's cancer research charity Kidscan, and a senior lecturer in biomedicine at the University of Salford. I teach biomedical science students on a IBMS accredited degree course and a biochemistry course that is accredited by the Society of Biology.

My research interests include cancer treatment, drug design and discovery, ECM biology, polysaccharide structural studies, technical development in glycomics and control of angiogenesis for the treatment of cancer. I also have considerable experience in clinical research, including taking part in radiotherapy and photodynamic therapy clinics and clinical trials. My current research interests include the development of complex polysaccharides as cancer therapeutic agents and the discovery of new antibiotics.

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David Pyle

Professor of Earth Sciences, University of Oxford
I studied Geological Sciences at the University of Cambridge, and then completed a PhD in Volcanology, working on the Greek island volcano of Santorini, and in the East African Rift. After a Research Fellowship in Cambridge, including a year as a visiting researcher at the California Institute of Technology, I took up a lectureship in Earth Sciences in Cambridge in 1992. I moved to the Department of Earth Sciences at the University of Oxford in 2006. My research focusses on the behaviour and histories of young and active volcanoes. I have worked extensively on volcanoes in Latin America, Ethiopia, and the Caribbean; and have worked on the rapid-response to volcanic unrest and eruptions in a number of different settings.

I am passionate about public and community engagement. Amongst others, I am involved with Oxford Sparks (http://www.oxfordsparks.ox.ac.uk); was part of the team that created Volcanoes Top Trumps (http://www.volcanoestoptrumps.org), and am currently working on the scientific, political and cultural responses to volcanic crises (https://curatingcrises.omeka.net/).

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David Rentz

Adjunct Professorial Research Fellow, School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University
David Rentz received his PhD in Entomology from the University of California, Berkeley and worked in Philadelphia and San Francisco before moving to Australia. From 1976 to 2001 he was Curator of Orthopteroid Insects in the Australian National Insect Collection, Canberra (CSIRO). His research specialty, the katydids (family Tettigoniidae) has resulted in numerous papers and three volumes of a Monograph of Australian Tettigoniidae.

Now retired, he lives in Kuranda, Queensland and continues his studies and contributes to a blog: http://www.bunyipco.blogspot.com.au/ that documents the natural history of the rainforest in which he lives. He is past president of the Friends of the Cairns Botanic Gardens. He is an Adjunct Professorial Research Fellow, School of Marine & Tropical Biology, James Cook University where he advises students and participates in University life.

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David Risk

Brian Mulroney Institute of Government Research Chair in Climate Science and Policy, St. Francis Xavier University
I am a specialist in gas emissions measurement and data processing techniques, to quantify emissions in natural and industrial settings. My ‘FluxLab’ team at St. Francis Xavier University consists of almost 30 students and professional researchers. We been involved in ecological gas measurement projects from pole to pole, monitoring design for CO2 deep injection sites, but most of our work has focused on quantifying methane emissions from Canadian industry. In recent years we have made gas emission measurements at over 15,000 oil and gas facilities across North America, both onshore and offshore, and over 120 landfills from coast to coast. Our work helps policymakers, regulators, and industry better understand and manage greenhouse gas emissions.

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David Rodríguez-Arias

David Rodríguez-Arias es Titular de Filosofía Moral en la Universidad de Granada, Subdirector de FiloLab-UGR (Área de Ética, Departamento de Filosofía I), y Vocal del Comité de Bioética de Andalucía. Sus investigaciones se han centrado en la bioética clínica (final de la vida, trasplantes) y global, la neuroética y la ética de la investigación.

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David Rowlings

Professor, Queensland University of Technology
Professor David Rowlings is a soil scientist in the Sustainable Agriculture program at the Centre for Agriculture and Bioeconomy. His research sits at the nexus of the environmental and agricultural science, enabling high impact research outcomes that benefit both fields for positive global change and food security. He specializes in the development and utilization of improved sensing and monitoring technologies for mitigating environmental greenhouse gases, improving crop fertiliser-use efficiency and monitoring soil carbon, reactive nitrogen and biogeochemical processes. His work spans the Australian beef, dairy, grains, sugar and horticulture industries and he has worked internationally in cropping and rice systems.

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David Roy

Lecturer in Education, University of Newcastle

David Roy is a lecturer in Education and Creative Arts at the University of Newcastle.

His research interests are in pedagogy and homeschooling, drama and arts learning, and dyspraxia and inclusion in Education. He was nominated for the 2006 Saltire/TES Scottish Education Publication of the Year and won the 2013 Best New Australian Publication for VCE Drama and/or VCE Theatre Studies. His most recent text is 'Teaching the Arts: Early Childhood and Primary’ (2015) published by Cambridge University Press.

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David Samson

Associate Professor, Anthropology, University of Toronto
David’s research directly addresses the central anthropological question of human uniqueness. In other words, the question that drives his work is what is it about our species that has made us the most successful animal on the planet? In the quest to understand what makes humans special, he’s comparatively worked with human and non-human primates (and wolves and dogs) around the globe to better understand the behavioral, physiological, and cognitive suite of traits that likely played a crucial role in our success. Specifically, his research investigates the link between sleep and human evolution through revolutionary new approaches, recording sleep data sets and sleep architecture for a range of primates including lemurs, zoo orangutans, wild chimpanzees, and humans living in different types and scales of societies. His research has probed sleep’s role in cognition, sociality, and group dynamics throughout human evolution.

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David Sanders

Regius Professor of Political Science, University of Essex

Professor David Sanders is the UK’s first Regius Professor of Political Science. He co-edited the top UK political science journal, the British Journal of Political Science, between 1990 and 2008.

He is a Fellow of the British Academy and received a Special Recognition Award from the Political Studies Association in 2012. From 2000-2012 he was a Principal Investigator for the British Election Study.

His current areas of research include political participation; election forecasting; the politics of the UK public sector; and measuring and assessing European citizenship.

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David Sear

Professor in Physical Geography, University of Southampton
David is a Professor of Physical Geography at the University of Southampton. He has over 28 years research experience in the areas of sediment transport and siltation in rivers, lakes and floodplains as well as flood risk management and river restoration. He has led projects looking at the impacts of agriculture on river ecology, impacts of sediments on salmon spawning habitats, the effectiveness of river maintenance including dredging, and the impacts of exterme flooding on river channels and infrastructure. David also works in the coastal zone and has led a major survey of the largest lost medieval port in the world at Dunwich (Britains Atlantis, www.dunwich.org.uk) where he has examined long term drivers of cliff eosion and coastal change. Most recently, David has focussed his research on the use of sediment archives in lakes for reconstructing the frequency and magnitude of natural hazards including flood records (e.g. following storm Desmond in 2015), Tropical Cyclones (e.g. Pam in Vanuatu in 2015), coastal storms (from marsh sediments). He leads a research programme in the tropical South Pacific where he uses lake sediments to reconstruct changes in El-Nino (ENSO) and the timing of arrival and ecosystem impacts of the first humans. David advises Defra, Environment Agency, Natural England and RGS among other organisations on River restoration, Natural Flood Managment and channel dynamics. He has worked all over the world and his research has been published in leading Journals. His work has featured in a wide range of media outlets including six TV documentaries.

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David Shepherd

Professor in Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, Trinity College Dublin
David Shepherd is Professor in Hebrew Bible/Old Testament in Trinity’s School of Religion, Theology, and Peace Studies, a member of its Loyola Institute and was the founding director of the Trinity Centre for Biblical Studies from 2016 to 2019.

He is co-author of Ezra & Nehemiah (Eerdmans, 2018), Bertolt Brecht and the David Fragments (Bloomsbury Academic, 2020) and author of Targum and Translation (Brill, 2004), The Bible on Silent Film (CUP, 2013), and most recently, King David, Innocent Blood, and Bloodguilt (OUP, 2023). His current research on light variation and religious imagery in stained glass is funded by Templeton. After serving in various roles at Trinity, Prof Shepherd was appointed as Trinity’s Senior Lecturer and Dean of Undergraduate Studies in 2021.

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David Singh1

Indigenist Health Humanities Academic Director, Queensland University of Technology

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David Spencer

My general interests lie in the economics and political economy of work, employment relations / work studies, the history of economic thought, and political economy. My approach to research and teaching encompasses ideas and insights from different disciplines and I retain an interest in promoting forms of interdisciplinary research and teaching. Current research focuses on a number of interconnected areas, including the conceptualisation of work, the changing boundaries between labour economics and other areas of labour research, the study of the quality of work and of worker well-being, and the process of financialisation especially as the latter bears on work and labor.

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David Stack

Professor of history, University of Reading
“The philosophers have only interpreted the world in various ways; the point, however, is to change it.” Thesis Eleven of Karl Marx’s Theses on Feuerbach (1845) is both a call to action and a demand that we situate philosophical thinking about the world within history. This sums up my interests as an intellectual historian.

My research and teaching explore the ideas, concepts, and ways of thinking about the world that dominated nineteenth and early twentieth century thought, and situates these ideas, concepts, and ways of thinking within their historical context.
My work ranges across both the history of the left, especially early nineteenth century radicalism, Chartism, and the life and writings of John Stuart Mill, and the history of science, especially phrenology, Darwinism, and eugenics. In each of these areas I seek to understand how ideas and concepts developed within the context of their own time - radicalism in dialogue with contemporary conservatism, Darwinism in interaction with capitalism and imperialism - in order to understand them historically.

This is a relevant and urgent activity because ideas and concepts formed in very different historical circumstances continue to frame our thinking today. History is the present interrogating the past in order to shape the future. The first step is to understand the past.

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David Stebenne

Professor David Stebenne teaches American legal history in the Moritz College of Law and modern U.S. political history in The Ohio State University History Department.

He graduated from Yale magna cum laude in 1982 and then earned a J.D. and Ph.D. in history from Columbia University through a joint-degree program that produces legal historians. He is a member of the Maryland Bar who moved directly into teaching, first at Yale (1991-1993) and then Ohio State (since 1993).

Professor Stebenne’s dissertation on the life and work of former labor lawyer and U.S. Supreme Court Justice Arthur J. Goldberg was published by Oxford University Press in 1996 under the title Arthur J. Goldberg: New Deal Liberal. While doing research on that project, Professor Stebenne worked with Goldberg directly during the last nine years of his life.

His second book was a study of the life and work of Arthur Larson, the legal academic who wrote the leading treatise on workers’ compensation law and also held three high-ranking posts in the administration of Dwight D. Eisenhower. Indiana University Press published this book under the title Modern Republican: Arthur Larson and the Eisenhower Years in 2006.

Professor Stebenne’s third book (co-authored with Joseph Mitchell) was a history of Columbia, Md., the planned suburban “new town” created by Baltimore lawyer and real estate developer James Rouse. This book was published by The History Press under the title New City Upon A Hill: A History of Columbia, Maryland in 2007.

He is at work on his fourth book, which is a political and legal history of the U.S. from the 1930s through the 1960s. The book’s working title is An Era of Moderation: The United States, 1933-1968.

Professor Stebenne also has written many articles, essays, and book reviews for a variety of legal and historical publications. Among the most recent is one titled “Who Really Won the Election of 1960?” which was first published on the Election Law @ Moritz website, and then on the History News Network (HNN) website and in print in the Columbus Bar Lawyers Quarterly.

He is interested in the history of American elections and in contemporary national politics. He serves the Election Law @ Moritz team as its “elections historian.” He comments regularly on national politics for both local and national media.

Professor Stebenne co-chaired (along with law professor Edward B. Foley and former political science professor Paul Beck) the Democracy Studies Speakers Series during 2012 and 2013. He served on the editorial board that oversaw the writing of a history of the Ohio General Assembly by historian David Gold. It was published in 2009 by Ohio University Press under the title Democracy in Session: A History of the Ohio General Assembly. Professor Stebenne serves as the chair of the committee overseeing the Ohio General Assembly Oral History Project, which is interviewing present and former Ohio lawmakers. He also is assisting the Ohio Supreme Court in its efforts to create an Ohio Supreme Court Historical Society.

Professor Stebenne is serving a three-year term on the Littleton-Griswold Prize Committee of the American Historical Association. The prize is awarded annually to author of the best book on American legal history.

He has won awards for his research, teaching and service.

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David Stevenson

Assistant Professor in the School of Film, Trinity College Dublin
David Stevenson is an Assistant Professor at Trinity College Dublin in the School of Film. His research interests focus on theorizing Japanese digital cultures and the application of interdisciplinary methodology and close reading to video games and animation. Recently, David has been examining the relationship between game narratives, their aesthetics, and the industrial efforts that produce them.

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David Stupples

Professor of Electrical and Electronic Engineering and Director of Electronic Warfare Research, City, University of London
Professor David Stupples specialises in research and development of radar systems and electronic warfare. For a number of years he undertook research in this area at the Royal Signals and Radar Establishment (RSRE) at Malvern in the UK followed by surveillance and intelligence systems research for the UK Government. He then spent three years developing surveillance systems and satellites for Hughes Aircraft Corporation in the US. In his early career, Dr David Stupples was employed in radar and EW by the Royal Air Force. Later, he was a senior partner with PA Consulting Group where he was responsible for the company's consultancy work in surveillance technology.

At City University London his research is now firmly focused in electronic warfare and radar counter measures. He is working with industry on low probability of intercept radars under the ELINT banner. David Stupples is an active member of the Association of Old Crows.

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David Sturrock

Senior Research Economist, Institute for Fiscal Studies
David joined the IFS in 2016, working in the Pensions and Public Finance sector. His current research examines household wealth, the intergenerational transmission of inequailty, and the impact of longer working lives on health. Previously, David was an economist at HM Treasury, working on fiscal policy, analysis of Scottish independence, and strategy for the 2015 Spending Review.

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David Suber

Doctoral research fellow, Jill Dando Institute of Security and Crime Science, UCL
Conducting research on people smuggling and border policing at the Jill Dando Institute of Crime Science, UCL. Previously working on international migration and antiquities trafficking in conflict zones. Award-winning freelance investigative journalist and documentarist. Creative editor and co-director of the journalist collective Brush&Bow C.I.C.

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David Tang

Research assistant, AustLit, The University of Queensland
I'm currently a student at the University of Queensland, studying the Bachelor of Communications with a major in Public Relations. I have worked with AustLit over a period of 4 months, and helped contribute to the AI in the Archive research project by creating a bibliography , as well as doing research and some designs.

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David Tittersor

Research Fellow, Alfred Deakin Institute for Citizenship and Globalisation, Deakin University

I am the Research Fellow to the UNESCO Chair for comparative research on cultural diversity and social justice, within the Alfred Deakin Institute for Citizenship and Globalisation, Deakin University. I wrote my Doctoral dissertation on the Turkish Muslim transnational organisation known as the Gülen Movement, which was published by Oxford University Press entitled 'The House of Service: The Gülen Movement and Islam's Third Way.' My research interests are Muslim movements, Turkish politics and society, religion and development, and the Middle East.

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David Tombs

Howard Paterson Chair of Theology and Public Issues, University of Otago
David Tombs is a lay Anglican theologian and the Howard Paterson Chair of Theology and Public Issues, at the University of Otago, Aotearoa New Zealand. He has a longstanding interest in contextual and liberation theologies and their application to social issues. He is originally from the United Kingdom and previously worked at the University of Roehampton in London (1992-2001), and then in Belfast, Northern Ireland, for the Irish School of Ecumenics, Trinity College Dublin (2001-2014).

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David Tremblay

Chercheur postdoctoral, Université du Québec à Chicoutimi (UQAC)
Je suis docteur en sciences de l'environnement. Je travaille comme chercheur postdoctoral et chargé de cours à l'Université du Québec à Chicoutimi. Mon travail porte sur la mise en œuvre du développement durable. Je travaille sur les outils de mise en œuvre, la gouvernance et l'engagement des parties prenantes dans les questions de durabilité et de transition. Au cours des douze dernières années, j'ai accompagné diverses organisations aux niveaux local et international sur des enjeux de développement durable, en outre dans l’élaboration de plan de développement durable. Mes plus notables accompagnements incluent la Ville de Québec, les Producteurs de lait du Québec, la Coopérative de transport maritime et aérien et les autorités portuaires canadiennes. En partenariat avec l'Organisation internationale de la Francophonie, j'ai participé à des ateliers de renforcement des capacités dans plusieurs pays de l’Afrique francophone, en Europe, dans les Caraïbes et aux États-Unis.

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David Tuffley

Dr. David Tuffley is a Senior Lecturer in Applied Ethics and SocioTechnical Studies at Griffith University’s School of ICT. A regular contributor to mainstream media on the social impact of technology, David is a recognized expert in his field. Before academia David worked as an IT Consultant in Australia and the United Kingdom, a role he continues to perform when not educating the next generation of IT professionals. David is an engaging science communicator of many years experience.

David came to the world of technology from the Humanities, having studied Psychology, Anthropology, Classical Rhetoric and English literature at the University of Queensland. David is an accomplished professional speaker and forum moderator.

David's formal qualifications include PhD (Software Engineering), Master of Philosophy (Information Systems), Grad Cert in Higher Education (all from Griffith University), Bachelor of Arts majoring in Psychology, English Literature, Anthropology (University of Queensland). David also completed an Associate Diploma in Health Surveying at the Queensland Institute of Technology (now QUT), working as a Health Surveyor in Ayr and Charleville (1978-1981).

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David Turner

Senior Lecturer in Sports Coaching, Anglia Ruskin University
I have a degree in Movement Studies (with Qualified Teacher Status), a Masters in Research (UK Sprint Coaches and Black/White Stereotypes), and an Educational Doctorate (Coaching Expertise Development). I have a number of coaching and fitness instruction awards, including a UEFA B football coaching licence. I am a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

My research interests are around the development of expertise, and learning journeys, in Sports Coaching, and beyond.

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David Turns

Senior Lecturer in International Law, Cranfield University
Dr Turns graduated from the London School of Economics and Political Science with an Upper Second Class LLB (Honours) degree in 1990 and an LLM in 1992, and has been a non-practising barrister and Member of the Honourable Society of the Inner Temple since 1992. From 1990 to 1994 he taught Public International Law as a Part-time Lecturer at the London School of Economics, and was a full Lecturer in Law at the University of Liverpool from 1994 to 2007.

He has specialised in the education and training of military legal advisers since 1995 and has also delivered courses on international law for humanitarian aid workers, military officers (non-legal, including senior commanders) and civil servants, in the UK and many other countries around the world.

Dr Turns was a Visiting Professor at the Institute of International Law and International Relations, University of Vienna, in 2002, and is a Member of the International Institute of Humanitarian Law (San Remo, Italy), the Board of Directors of the International Society for Military Law & the Law of War, and the Advisory Board of the Hungarian Yearbook of International Law & European Law.

Research opportunities
International Humanitarian Law (the Law of Armed Conflict) (jus in bello)
Legality of the Use of Force by States (jus ad bellum)
International Criminal Law

Current activities
Dr Turns' current scholarly interests are:

the historical and contemporary evolution of warfare and its effect on the development and interpretation of the laws of war;
Rules of Engagement as a tool for the governance of armed and security forces;
the doctrine of armed reprisals;
the status and treatment of prisoners of war.

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David Valls-Gabaud

Astrophysicien, Directeur de recherches au CNRS, Observatoire de Paris

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David Verhoeven

Assistant Professor of Vet Microbiology and Preventive Medicine, Iowa State University
Researcher investigating differences between infants and adults immunologically with respect to why the young often get more sick with viruses. Investigating new mRNA vaccines and protein vaccines for diseases that infect humans and ag animals especially focused on coronaviruses, influenza (seasonal and high path), RSV, and parainfluenza. Investigating basic nucleic acid structures in RSV and competition between Sars-CoV-2 and RSV for infection in the same individuals.

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David Wachenfeld

Research Program Director- Reef Ecology and Monitoring, Australian Institute of Marine Science

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David Waldron

Senior Lecturer in History, Federation University Australia
Dr Waldron is a historian working in the School of Education and Arts. Dr David Waldron joined Federation University, then the University of Ballarat, in 1999 whilst engaged in post graduate study.

In his time at Federation University, Dr Waldron has developed a passion for community historical engagement, regularly supporting, writing and developing community heritage events, support local theatre and online productions in historical areas of research. He is the researcher and co-writer of the Goldfields History pod cast series Tales from Rat City, which won the National Trust of Australia (Victoria) People’s Choice award in 2019 and recently completed the Lucas Girls and the Avenue of Honour Audio Tours commemorating the lives of the men and women who served in the First World War from Ballarat and district. More recently Dr Waldron has coordinated the digital mapping of the Yarrowee in collaboration with the Wadawurrung Traditional Owners Aboriginal Corporation and the City of Ballarat. Dr Waldron is also one of the primary contributors and architects of the annual Ballarat Heritage Festival and contributes to the Maldon Gothic Festival and the Melbourne Magic Festival with his colleague Dr Jo Clyne. He is the author of "Sign of the Witch: Modernity and the Pagan Revival, "Shock! the Black Dog of Bungay: A Case Study in Local Folklore", "Goldfields and the Gothic" and "Aradale: the Making of a Haunted Asylum". He is also a TEDx speaker discussing the legacy of haunting and ghost stories in response to traumatic events in a community.

David is a folklorist and historian with a particular focus on the development of urban legends and popular folklore as a response to traumatic community experiences. He is interested in the intersection of folklore, popular culture and the creation of shared mythology and story-telling. He is also interested in tracing the development of folklore attached to historic and sacred sites and the development of urban legends in relation to social, cultural and political crisis in communities. He has a strong interest in new religious movements and the concomitant development of new mythologies and belief systems.

Research interests:

New Religious movements
Folklore Studies and community identity
The intersection of community folklore and popular culture/urban legends
Active learning models in Historical Education
Place, Culture and Identity formation in small, communities
Ghost Stories and Urban legends as a cultural response to shared trauma.


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David Waller

Senior Lecturer, School of Marketing, University of Technology Sydney

David Waller is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Marketing, University of Technology, Sydney. David has over 20 years experience teaching marketing subjects at several universities, including University of Newcastle, University of New South Wales and Charles Sturt University-Riverina. His research has included projects on marketing communications, advertising agency-client relationships; controversial advertising; international advertising; marketing ethics; and marketing education.

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David Wells

Honorary Research Associate at the Cyber Threats Research Centre, Swansea University
David Wells is an independent global security consultant worked with national, regional and international governments on a range of emerging terrorism and counter-terrorism challenges, including terrorist exploitation of technology, far-right violent extremism and the intersection between climate change and terrorism. He is also an Honorary Research Associate at Swansea University’s Cyber Threat’s Research Centre (CYTREC), and a non-Resident Scholar at the Middle East Institute.

Previously, he spent five years as Head of Research and Analysis at the UN Counter-Terrorism Executive Directorate in New York, managing the team responsible for monitoring terrorism and geopolitical trends for the Counter-Terrorism Committee of the Security Council. David began his career coordinating investigations into international terrorist networks for GCHQ, the UK’s largest intelligence agency, has worked for multiple agencies in the Australian intelligence community, and has written for and collaborated with the leading research and academic institutions focused on counter-terrorism and CVE.

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David Wiltshire

Professor of Theoretical Physics, University of Canterbury
David L Wiltshire is a professor of theoretical physics at the University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand. His research interests are in general relativity, cosmology and quantum gravity.

He began his career working on higher-dimensional gravity, brane worlds and black holes as a PhD student in the Cambridge relativity group in the mid 1980s. He has subsequently explored a large range of ideas on topics including quantum cosmology, gravastars and dark energy. Since the mid 2000s his research has focused on the averaging problem and backreaction in inhomogeneous cosmology. By revisiting the foundational principles of general relativity, he has developed the "timescape cosmology", a phenomenological viable alternative to the standard cosmology, without dark energy.

David is on the editorial board of Classical and Quantum Gravity, an IUPAP representative on the committee of the International Society on General Relativity and Gravitation (ISGRG), President of the New Zealand Institute of Physics, and a member of the Foundational Questions Institute (FQXi). He is also a past President of the Australasian Society for General Relativity and Gravitation.

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David Yamane

Professor of Sociology, Wake Forest University
David Yamane earned his BA (’91) in sociology from the University of California at Berkeley and his MS (’94) and Ph.D. (’98) in sociology from the University of Wisconsin at Madison. After teaching at the University of Notre Dame and holding a post-doc at the University of Virginia’s Center on Religion and Democracy, he joined the sociology faculty at Wake Forest in 2005. He served as department chair from 2009 to 2011 and is currently an affiliated faculty member in the Department of Religion and School of Divinity.

For the first 20 years of his academic career, Professor Yamane specialized in the sociology of religion, a field in which he authored, co-authored or edited 6 books and 2 major scholarly journals.

Since 2011, Professor Yamane has studied guns, especially the new self-defense-oriented core of American gun culture that Michael Bane calls Gun Culture 2.0. Among his publications in this area is a short history of concealed carry in the US, Concealed Carry Revolution: Liberalizing the Right to Bear Arms in America, and a review essay on “The Sociology of US Gun Culture.”

As he continues to work on a book combining his personal experiences and sociological observations of Gun Culture 2.0, Professor Yamane shares his thoughts on two blogs, gunculture2point0.com and guncurious.com, and on Twitter at @davidyamane and @gunculture2pt0.

In 2022, he launched a YouTube channel, “Light Over Heat with Professor David Yamane,” on which he posts weekly short videos about issues related to his scholarship.

Professional headshots and a full biography are available on Professor Yamane’s personal website davidyamane.com.

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David Zarifa

Canada Research Chair in Life Course Transitions in Northern and Rural Communities; Professor of Sociology, Nipissing University
David Zarifa is Professor and Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Life Course Transitions in Northern & Rural Communities in the Department of Sociology at Nipissing University and Academic Director of the Nipissing University Research Data Centre.

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