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Cameron Webb

Dr Cameron Webb is a Clinical Lecturer with the University of Sydney and Principal Hospital Scientist with the Department of Medical Entomology at Pathology West - ICPMR Westmead (NSW Health Pathology & Westmead Hospital). Cameron's primary focus is understanding the role of environmental management and urban development in reducing the risks of mosquito-borne disease caused by Murray Valley encephalitis virus, Ross River virus and Barmah Forest virus. However, he has also been called on to provide expert advice on a range of medically important arthropods, such as ticks, mites, biting midges, bed bugs and flies, to local, state and federal government agencies.

Key to his research is an understanding of the ecological role of mosquitoes and how wetland conservation, construction and rehabilitation projects may influence regional mosquito-borne disease risk together with changes in the local environment resulting from climate change, potential introductions of exotic mosquito species and personal protection strategies (e.g. insect repellents).

In his position with the University of Sydney, Cameron regularly provides lectures in a range of undergraduate and post graduate courses and has supervised a number of research students including collaborative projects with the University of Western Sydney, the Australian Catholic University and the University of South Australia.

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Camilla Baasch Andersen

Camilla has been a professional academic in Commercial Law for almost 20 years, starting as a Resarch Fellow at University of Copenhagen, where she obtained her initial law degree (Cand Jur). She has held posts at Queen Mary, University of London, University of Leicester and visiting posts on three continents. She has published extensively on comparative commercial law, international sales (CISG) and commercial arbitration. For more information, see her webste at: http://www.uwa.edu.au/people/camilla.andersen

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Camilla Nelson

Camilla Nelson lectures in Media and Communications at the University of Notre Dame Australia, and specialises in fiction and non fiction writing, adaptation and history in popular culture. Previously she was a lecturer in the Creative Practices Group at UTS. In addition to a range of scholarly and other essays, she is also a published novelist. Her work includes, Perverse Acts, for which she was named as one of the Sydney Morning Herald's Best Young Australian Novelists of the Year, and Crooked, which was shortlisted in the 2009 Ned Kelly Awards. She is also a former journalist, and has a Walkley Award Best All Media Online News (2001) for her work at the Sydney Morning Herald.

Camilla's work has been recognised through the award of grants from the Literature Board of the Australia Council and the Australian Film Commission. She has served as a judge of the NSW Premier's Literary Awards (2008 and 2012), the Kathleen Mitchell Award (2008 to 2014), the Sydney Morning Herald's Best Young Australian Novelists (2015), and on the governing board of the NSW Writers' Centre (2008-2011).

Her most recent book is a co-edited collection of essays On Happiness, UWA Press, 2015.

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Caren Morrison

Caren Myers Morrison, associate professor of law, teaches Evidence and Criminal Procedure. She served as an assistant U.S. attorney in Eastern District of New York from 2001 to 2006, where she prosecuted international narcotics traffickers and organized crime. Her research focuses on the impact of electronic information on the criminal justice system and on mechanisms of jury selection.

Morrison graduated from Columbia Law School, where she was a James Kent Scholar (1996-97), a Harlan Fiske Stone Scholar (1994-96), and a notes editor of the Columbia Law Review. After graduation, she clerked for U.S. District Court Judge Eugene H. Nickerson of the Eastern District of New York and for Judge John M. Walker Jr. of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit. From 2006 to 2009, she was acting assistant professor at New York University School of Law. Before law school, Morrison trained as a journalist at London’s City University and worked as freelance journalist in London for seven years.

Morrison’s most recent article, “Negotiating Peremptory Challenges,” forthcoming in the Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology, proposes a system of negotiated consent to supplant the regime of regulating peremptory strikes through the framework established under Batson v. Kentucky. Her previous articles have explored the impact of the Internet on the functioning of the jury, the interplay of Facebook and the Fifth Amendment, the ways in which online access to court records affects prosecutorial accountability and the use of drones for domestic surveillance. Her articles have been published in the Vanderbilt Law Review, the Hastings Law Journal, the California Law Review Circuit and the Columbia Law Review Sidebar.

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Carey King

Dr. Carey W King is the Assistant Director of the Energy Institute at the University of Texas Austin.

He performs interdisciplinary research related to how energy systems interact within the economy and environment as well as how our policy and social systems can make decisions and tradeoffs among these often competing factors. The past performance of our energy systems is no guarantee of future returns, yet we must understand the development of past energy systems. Carey’s research goals center on rigorous interpretations of the past to determine the most probable future energy pathways.

He has both a B.S. with high honors and Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin. He has published technical articles in the academic journals Environmental Science and Technology, Environmental Research Letters, Nature Geoscience, Energy Policy, Sustainability, and Ecology and Society. He has also written commentary for Earth magazine discussing energy, water, and economic interactions. Dr. King has several patents as former Director for Scientific Research of Uni-Pixel Displays, Inc.

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Carl Emmerson

Carl is Deputy Director of the Institute for Fiscal Studies and programme director of their work on direct taxes and welfare. He is an editor of the annual IFS Green Budget. His recent research includes analysis of the impact of the financial crisis and association recession, and the Government's response, on the UK's public finances. He has examined the effect of UK pension reforms on the public finances, retirement behaviour, labour market mobility, incentives to save and inequality, and has evaluated the large scale pilots of the Education Maintenance Allowance, the Pathways-to-Work reforms to incapacity benefits and the Saving Gateway matched savings vehicle. He has previously served as a specialist advisor to the House of Commons Work and Pensions Select Committee.

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Carl Rhodes

Carl Rhodes is Professor of Organization Studies at UTS Business School. Working in the disciplines organization studies and business ethics, his current research investigates the ethical and political environments in which contemporary organizations operate and its effects on their behaviour. Central focus is on how organizations, especially corporations, can and should be held to account for their actions by citizens and by civil society. This work endeavours to contribute to the rigorous and critical questioning an reformulation of what the purpose of work organizations in the context of democracy.

Carl’s most recent books are The Companion to Ethics and Politics in Organizations (Routledge, 2015 with Alison Pullen), and Organizations and Popular Culture (Routledge, 2012 Simon Lilley). His work appears in journals such as Organization Studies, Human Relations, Organization, The Journal of Business Ethics, and The Leadership Quarterly. He serves as Senior Editor of the journal Organization Studies as well as Associate Editor of Organization and Gender, Work and Organization.

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Carla Figueira

Carla Figueira, BA MA PhD FHEA FRSA, is an academic in the field of international cultural relations and cultural and linguistic policies. She is the Director of the MA in Cultural Policy, Relations and Diplomacy and of the MA in Tourism and Cultural Policy at the Institute for Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship, Goldsmiths, University of London.

Carla is an international relations graduate of the Instituto Superior de Ciências Sociais e Políticas, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa (Portugal), she moved to London after a career in arts management. In the UK, she went on to gain an MA in Arts Management (City University, UK, Chevening Scholar) and a PhD in Cultural Policy and Management (City University, UK, Praxis XXI Scholar).

Carla is interested in international cultural relations as a transdisciplinary field, as well as being interested in the areas of cultural policy and arts management and in language policy. Her research interests encompass several academic disciplines, including international studies, history, cultural studies, sociology, linguistics and psychology. Keywords she has used to describe her work include: cultural diplomacy, cultural relations, sociolinguistics, language-spread policies, international cultural policy, international organisations, hegemony, soft power.

Carla is a member of ENCATC, the leading European network on Cultural Management and Cultural Policy education and a member of the British International Studies Association. She is a Chevening Alumna and Buddy.

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Carlo Ratti

Director of MIT Senseable City Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

An architect and engineer by training, Professor Carlo Ratti practises in Italy and teaches at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He directs the MIT Senseable City Lab and the design office Carlo Ratti Associati. He chairs the World Economic Forum Global Agenda Council on Future Cities. He graduated from the Politecnico di Torino and the École Nationale des Ponts et Chaussées in Paris, and later earned his MPhil and PhD at the University of Cambridge, UK. Ratti has co-authored over 200 publications and holds several patents. His work has been exhibited worldwide at venues such as the Venice Biennale, the Design Museum Barcelona, the Science Museum in London, GAFTA in San Francisco and The Museum of Modern Art in New York. His Digital Water Pavilion at the 2008 World Expo was hailed by Time Magazine as one of the Best Inventions of the Year. He has been included in Esquire Magazine’s Best and Brightest list, in Blueprint Magazine’s 25 People who will Change the World of Design and in Forbes Magazine’s People you need to know in 2011. Ratti was a presenter at TED 2011 and is serving as a member of the World Economic Forum Global Agenda Council for Urban Management. He is a regular contributor to the architecture magazine Domus and the Italian newspaper Il Sole 24 Ore. He has also written as an op-ed contributor for BBC, La Stampa, Scientific American and The New York Times.

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Carlton Mark Waterhouse

Professor Carlton Waterhouse has served at the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law since 2010. He is nationally recognized for his work on environmental justice and is known internationally for his research and writing on reparations for historic injustices and state human rights violations. His views have been published in the Wall Street Journal online and his articles have appeared in prestigious law journals including the Pennsylvania Journal of International Law, the Fordham Environmental Law Review, and the Rutgers Law Review. He attended college at the Pennsylvania State University where he studied engineering and the ethics of technology before deciding to pursue a legal education. He is a graduate of Howard University School of Law, where he was admitted as one of its distinctive Merit Fellows. While in law school, he was selected for an internship with the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law where he participated in the preliminary formation and development of the Civil Rights Act of 1992. Professor Waterhouse currently serves as a member of the Indiana Advisory Committee to the United States Civil Rights Commission

After law school, he began his career as an attorney with the United States Environmental Protection Agency where he served in the Office of Regional Counsel in Atlanta, Georgia and the Office of General Counsel in Washington, D.C. At the EPA, he served as the chief counsel for the agency in several significant cases and as a national and regional expert on environmental justice, earning three of the Agency’s prestigious national awards. His responsibilities at the EPA included enforcement actions under numerous environmental statutes, the development of regional and national policy on Environmental Justice and the application of the Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to the EPA permitting actions. Following a successful nine-year career with the EPA, Professor Waterhouse enrolled in a Ph.D. program in the Emory University Graduate School of Arts and Sciences as one of the select George W. Woodruff Fellows. The previous year, he graduated with honors from the Candler School of Theology at Emory University with a Master of Theological Studies degree. In 2006, he graduated from Emory with a Ph.D. in Social Ethics.

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Carly Sawatzki

Dr Carly Sawatzki is a teacher-educator with expertise in curriculum and pedagogy across the Victorian and Australian curricula (VCE, Victorian Curriculum, Australian Curriculum). Carly's subject areas include upper primary Mathematics, middle school Economics & Business, senior school Business Management and senior school Psychology. Being an interdisciplinarian is critical to her key area of interest, contextual learning.

Carly's PhD explored the role of social and mathematical understandings in children's financial problem-solving and decision-making. Her ongoing research focuses on the 'Money and financial mathematics'​ strand of the Australian Curriculum - Mathematics in upper primary school, and has involved developing, trialling, studying, and refining unique financial dilemmas and associated pedagogies to enhance financial literacy teaching and learning. Some of her tasks have been included in the Encouraging Persistence, Maintaining Challenge (EPMC) project.

Before switching careers to teaching and academia, Carly worked in marketing and business development roles in the finance industry.

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Carol Johnson

Carol Johnson has published numerous chapters and articles on Australian politics. She is also the author of the books, The Labor Legacy: Curtin, Chifley, Whitlam, Hawke (Allen and Unwin, Sydney, 1989) and Governing Change: From Keating to Howard (Network Books, Perth, 2nd edition 2007). Most recently she co-edited, Carol Johnson and John Wanna (with Hsu-Ann Lee), Abbott's Gambit: The 2013 Australian Federal Election (ANU Press, Canberra, 2015) http://press.anu.edu.au/titles/abbotts-gambit/

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Carole Mundell

Mundell - Professor of Extragalactic Astronomy - is an observational astrophysicist who specialises in astrophysical phenomena outside of our own galaxy, including gamma ray bursts and active galactic nuclei.

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Caroline Clark

Senior Lecturer in Organisation Studies, The Open University

Caroline Clarke is a Senior Lecturer in Management at the Open University Business School. Caroline previously worked in Bristol Business School, and prior to that she spent five years as a researcher on the Change Management Consortium (previously at Bath and Cranfield University).

Caroline's undergraduate degree was awarded by the Open University and her positive student experience meant that returning to the Open University some years later as an academic was an easy decision to take. Caroline's main research interests are located in identity and emotion, and she has also written about managers and change, and has presented on auto-ethnography as a methodology. Caroline has recently collaborated on a 3 year study of academics in business schools exploring concepts of identities, insecurities, gender, and career behaviours amid the increasingly performative demands of academia.

Caroline is currently conducting research looking at the professional identities of Veterinary Surgeons with Professor David Knights. For this timely and important project they have been awarded several small grants and now hope to extend their work to include a cross-cultural study to help inform and make a comparison with the findings from the UK (73 veterinary surgeons).

Caroline work is qualitative, and is situated within a critical interpretive framework, with a particular interest and focus on discourse.

Caroline has published in Human Relations, Organization Studies, the International Journal of Human Resource Management, and the Scandinavian Journal of Management. Caroline also undertakes peer reviewing activity for a number of journals.

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Caroline Isaksson

Senior Lecturer and Associate Professor in Biology, Evolutionary Ecology unit, Lund University

Caroline is the Senior Lecturer in Biology at Lund University. Her main research interests lie in the interface between ecology, evolution, toxicology and physiology and her current research focuses on the impacts of urbanization on avian populations. Before her permanent position at Lund University, she was a post-doctoral fellow at Oxford University/UK and at the University of Groningen/the Netherlands. Her PhD-degree was awarded in 2007 at Gothenburg University/Sweden.

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Caroline Knowles

Caroline writes on race and ethnicity, especially postcolonial whiteness, circulations of people (as migrants) and objects, urbanism and madness. She specializes in visual, spatial and biographical methods. She collaborates with photographers, most recently with Douglas Harper of Duquesne University in Pittsburg investigating how British migrants live in Hong Kong (funded by the British Academy). She has just completed the biography of a pair of flip-flop sandals with artist Michael Tan of Nanyang Technological University in Singapore (funded by the British Academy). This involved following the plastic trail from factories in SE China to Ethiopia, one of China’s most important emerging markets, passing through the lives of migrant factory workers, smugglers, market traders and onto the feet of an elderly woman navigating the streets of Addis Ababa in a year old pair of flip-flops. She also worked with Roger Hewitt and colleagues in Hamburg and Bergen on 'The Architecture of Religious Transmission'. This project, funded by NORFACE, investigates the mechanisms of religious transmission among young people in the Finsbury Park area of London and comparable sites in Hamburg and Oslo. She is currently working on a research project investigating British migrants in Beijing.

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Carolyn Whitzman

Carolyn Whitzman is Professor in Urban Planning at the University of Melbourne. She is the lead researcher for Transforming Housing and lead editor of 'Melbourne: What Next? A discussion on creating a better future for Melbourne' (Research Monograph No. 1, Melbourne Sustainable Society Institute, University of Melbourne, 2014), 'Building Inclusive Cities: Women’s Safety and the Right to the City' (Earthscan, 2013), author of 'Suburb, Slum, Urban Village: Transformations in a Toronto Neighbourhood 1875-2002' (University of British Columbia Press, 2009) and 'The Handbook of Community Safety, Gender, and Violence Prevention: practical planning tools' (Earthscan, 2008), and the co-author of 'Safe Cities: guidelines for planning, design, and management' (Van Nostrand Reinhold, 1995). She has also published numerous peer-reviewed scholarly publications, book chapters, and reports on partnerships for social justice in the city, with particular emphasis on the supporting the rights of women, children and people with disabilities to access affordable housing, public transportation, social services, and public space.

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Cassandra Cross

Cassandra is currently a Senior Lecturer with the School of Justice, Queensland University of Technology. She joined QUT in 2012, from the Queensland Police Service, where she worked in research and policy roles. Since 2008, Cassandra has focused her research on various aspects of online fraud, including the policing of online fraud, the prevention of online fraud, and the need to support victims who experience online fraud. In 2011, she was awarded the Donald Mackay Churchill Fellowship, which enabled her to travel to the UK, USA and Canada to examine how these jurisdictions respond to online fraud.

She is has just completed a national project with colleagues aimed at improving the reporting experiences and support services available to online fraud victims. This project interviewed 80 victims of online fraud across Australia who reported losses over $10K to the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission. The findings from this research are due for release shortly.

Cassandra contributes to Project Sunbird, which is a collaborative project targeting online fraud between the West Australian Police and Department of Commerce. She is also the author of the training package entitled "Seniors Online Security", which was developed by the Carindale Police Citizens Youth Club, and is a regular speaker at seniors groups across Australia, educating them about online security. Recently, she was elected to the Board of Directors, for the Queensland Police Citizens Youth Welfare Association (QPCYWA).

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Catherine Barnard

Professor of EU law and employment law, University of Cambridge

MA (Cantab), LLM (EUI), PhD (Cantab)

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Catherine Douglas

Lecturer in Animal Science, Newcastle University

The pinnacle of my achievement to date has to be my Ig Nobel Prize, International Prize for Veterinary Medicine .

More serious roles and responsibilities are as a Lecturer at Newcastle University in Animal Science, Agriculture and Joint Honours in Science. I lecture in a range of Animal Science (Livestock and Companion) related disciplines including: Animal Welfare, Behaviour, Nutrition.

Degree Programme Director Joint Honours in Science, Newcastle University

Research Interests:

Animal Welfare and Behaviour:

Human-animal interaction and its affects on welfare, behaviour and production in the dairy herd.
Cognitive bias to measure affective state. Can whether an animal perceives its glass half full or half empty, be measured and if so can it inform on the welfare of the animal under different management regimes.
Companion animal behaviour and welfare
Student Transition:

Peer Assisted Learning, and extended inductions to reduce attrition and increase success in non-traditional learners in HE.

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Catherine Harris

Catherine studied Geography (MA Hons) at the University of Oxford, graduating in 2005. She completed a MA in International Studies at the University of Birmingham in 2007, which was awarded with distinction. She gained her PhD from the University of Birmingham in 2012.

Her PhD investigated the experiences of Polish migrant entrepreneurs in the West Midlands region of the UK and is the first large-scale study of its kind. Her research has attracted interest internationally and has been disseminated in both the print and broadcast media.

Catherine's expertises lie in the fields of entrepreneurship and enterprise, ethnic entrepreneurship, social difference, EU enlargement, EU migration, Polish migration and the Polish community in the UK.

Methodologically, Catherine’s interest is in qualitative and ethnographic research.

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Catherine Hausman

Assistant Professor of Public Policy, University of Michigan

Catherine H. Hausman is an Assistant Professor in the School of Public Policy and a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economics Research. Her work focuses on environmental and energy economics. Her research has appeared in the American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, the American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, and the Brookings Papers on Economic Activity. Recent projects have looked at the economic and environmental impacts of shale gas; the market impacts of nuclear power plant closures; and the effects of electricity market deregulation on nuclear power safety. Prior to her graduate studies, Catherine studied in Peru under a Fulbright grant. She has taught Statistics, a policy seminar on Energy and the Environment, and a course on Government Regulation of Industry and the Environment. She holds a BA from the University of Minnesota and a PhD from the University of California, Berkeley.

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Cathy Treadway

Professor of Creative Practice, Cardiff Metropolitan University

Cathy is Professor of Creative Practice and was one of the founding members of CARIAD. She is currently Principal Investigator on a major international interdisciplinary AHRC design research project: LAUGH (Ludic Artifacts Using Gesture and Haptics). This collaborative research is investigating ways of designing to support the wellbeing of people with late stage dementia.

Her PhD research investigated the ways in which digital imaging technology impacts on the creative practice of artists and designers; the theme of digital technology and creativity is continued in her current research which focuses on the importance of touch, physicality and lived experience.

Cathy is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, Fellow of the Higher Education Academy, has a Master of Arts in ceramics (University of Wales) and a B.A. (Hons.) in textiles and fashion (Loughborough University). Her research interests have been stimulated by her considerable experience working as a designer for industry. She has expertise in large format digital ink-jet printing, three-dimensional printing (rapid prototyping) and is fluent in an array of design software applications. She is an experienced educator, PhD supervisor and examiner and has been a reviewer for RCUK, British Council and a number of academic journals and conferences.

Cathy has undertaken collaborative research with universities in the UK, USA and Australia and regularly presents her research at conferences around the world. Cathy is Visiting Research Fellow in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Bath and Visiting Scholar at University of Technology Sydney, Australia.

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Cecilia Hyunjung Mo

Assistant Professor of Political Science, Vanderbilt University

Cecilia Hyunjung Mo is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science, with a courtesy appointment at the Peabody College of Education and Human Development for Vanderbilt University. She is also a W. Glenn Campbell and Rita Ricardo-Campbell National Fellow and the Robert Eckles Swain National Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University.

Her research and teaching interests include a broad array of issues in political behavior, public policy, and the political economy of development. She is concerned with basic research on bounded rationality, as well as in integrating insights from theories of bounded rationality into models and empirical analyses of political and economic decision-making and institutions.

Her applied work namely focuses on understanding and addressing important social problems related to inequality, prejudice, gender-based violence, and education. She is currently working on several papers examining how to model biases to which individuals are subject, as well as research on human trafficking vulnerability and public opinion around human trafficking policies. In addition to this work, she has written on a variety of other topics, including anti-immigrant sentiment and education policy.

She is the recipient of the American Political Science Association's 2015 Franklin L. Burdette/Pi Sigma Alpha Award for the best paper presented at the previous year's annual meeting.

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Ceridwen Fraser

Senior lecturer, Australian National University

I have a couple of undergraduate degrees from Australia (University of Canberra and Macquarie University) and a PhD from the University of Otago in New Zealand. I worked as a postdoctoral fellow in New Zealand (University of Otago) and then in Belgium (Universite Libre de Bruxelles) before taking up a permanent position as a lecturer in the Fenner School of Environment and Society at the Australian National University in 2012. My research focuses on the biogeography and evolution of Southern Hemisphere species. I use both ecological and genetic techniques to address research questions, and have a particular interest in high-latitude (sub-Antarctic and Antarctic) ecosystems.

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Charles Gardner Geyh

Professor Geyh teaches and writes in the areas of judicial conduct, ethics, procedure, independence, accountability and administration. He is the author of Courting Peril: The Political Transformation of the American Judiciary (Oxford University Press, forthcoming 2015); When Courts and Congress Collide: The Struggle for Control of America's Judicial System (University of Michigan Press 2006) and Disqualification: An Analysis Under Federal Law (2d ed. Federal Judicial Center 2011); coauthor of Judicial Conduct and Ethics (5th ed., Lexis Law Publishing 2013) (with Alfini, Lubet and Shaman); and Understanding Civil Procedure (5th ed. 2013) (with Shreve and Raven-Hansen); and editor of What's Law Got to Do With it? What Judges Do, Why They Do It, and What's at Stake (Stanford University Press 2011). His scholarship has appeared in over 60 books, articles, book chapters, reports and other publications.

Geyh has served a number of governments and governmental organizations. He has been a consultant to: the Parliamentary Development Project on Judicial Independence and Administration for the Supreme Rada of Ukraine; the United States Department of Justice in the corruption trial of Pennsylvania Judge Mark Ciavarella; the Administrative Office of California Courts Task Force on Judicial Campaign Practices; the Pennsylvania House of Representatives on the impeachment and removal of Pennsylvania Supreme Court Justice Rolf Larsen; and the National Commission on Judicial Discipline and Removal. In addition, he has served as an expert witness in the United States House and Senate on the impeachment and removal of District Judge G. Thomas Porteous and as legislative liaison to the Federal Courts Study Committee.

Geyh has also assisted a range of other organizations on issues relating to the administration of justice. He has served the American Bar Association as director of and consultant to its Judicial Disqualification Project and as Reporter to four Commissions (the Joint Commission to Evaluate the Model Code of Judicial Conduct, the Commission on the 21st Century Judiciary, the Commission on the Public Financing of Judicial Campaigns, and the Commission on the Separation of Powers and Judicial Independence). He has also served on the Board of Directors of the Justice at Stake Campaign; as Reporter to the Constitution Project Task Force on the Distinction between Intimidation and Legitimate Criticism of Judges; as Director of the American Judicature Society's Center for Judicial Independence; and as chair of the editorial committee for the journal Judicature. He is a member of the American Law Institute, and a Fellow of the American Bar Foundation and of the Pound Civil Justice Institute.

A recipient of the Leon Wallace Teaching Award and a two-time recipient of the IU Trustees' Teaching Award, Geyh has taught courses on civil procedure, legal ethics, federal courts, judicial conduct, and the relationship between courts and legislatures.

Following graduation from University of Wisconsin Law School, Geyh clerked for Judge Thomas A. Clark of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit. He then worked as an associate at Covington & Burling in Washington, D.C., and served as counsel to the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on the Judiciary. Professor Geyh began his teaching career in 1991 at the Widener University School of Law and joined the law faculty at Indiana in 1998.

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Charles Hankla

Charles R. Hankla is associate professor of political science at Georgia State University in Atlanta. He received his PhD in 2005 from Emory University, and he also holds degrees from Georgetown University and the London School of Economics.

Charles' research is in the fields of comparative and international political economy, and he has a particular interest in political institutions as they relate to fiscal decentralization, budgeting, and trade and industrial policy. His research has included cross-national, quantitative studies and also field-work based analyses of India and France. Charles' previous work has appeared in such journals as the American Political Science Review, International Studies Quarterly, and Comparative Political Studies. Charles is also an active consultant, particularly on topics related to fiscal decentralization and public budgeting. Most recently, he has worked on projects related to Vietnam and Egypt that were supported by USAID and the UNDP. Finally, Charles is a member of the Scholar Strategy Network, an organization which seeks to bring academic research to the attention of policy-makers.

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Charles J. Dunlap, Jr.

I served as a military lawyer (judge advocate) for 34 years before retiring in 2010 as a major general in the US Air Force. I am a Professor of the Practice and Executive Director of the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security at Duke Law School.

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Charles Lees

Professor Charles Lees joined the Department in September 2011. Previously he was at the University of Sheffield.

He is currently a Visiting Professorial Fellow at the University of Sussex and a Visiting Fellow at the University of Birmingham. He has also held visiting fellowships at the University of California San Diego, the Australian National University, and the University of Sydney.

He has written extensively on comparative politics, policy, and methodology as well as providing media commentary and research and advice for organisations such as the BBC, Sky News, Australian Labor Party, the Green Party of Aotearoa New Zealand, and the Scottish Executive.

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Charles Livingstone

Charles is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine at Monash University. His principal research interests are in gambling as a public health issue, social theory of gambling, ethics of gambling research and reform of gambling regulation.

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Charles Warren

Senior Lecturer, Geography and Sustainable Development, University of St Andrews

My academic career started with three degrees in quick succession - an MA in Geography at Oxford (1985), an MSc in Natural Resource Management at Edinburgh (1987) and then a NERC-funded PhD in Glaciology (1990), also at Edinburgh. Having worked in Greenland during my PhD, I then continued my research on the interaction between glaciers and climate change in Patagonia during a 3-year NERC Research Fellowship based in Edinburgh. In 1995 I moved to St Andrews as a Lecturer and was promoted to Senior Lecturer in 2003. In 2004 I was awarded the President's Medal of the Royal Scottish Geographical Society. In 2006 I led the St Andrews bid which won the Times Higher Award for 'Outstanding Contribution to Sustainable Development'.

I have always had strong interests both in environmental management and in glaciology. For much of my career I have focused mainly on the latter, exploring the dynamics and climate sensitivity of calving glaciers in the arctic, in the southern hemisphere (Patagonia, New Zealand) and in Nepal. More recently my interests have moved more into environmental management and sustainable development, both in my research and my teaching. A second edition of my 2002 book Managing Scotland's Environment was published in 2009, and I am actively involved in researching the debates surrounding the development of renewable energy, especially the nature of public attitudes. This has led, inter alia, to a co-edited book investigating aspects of wind power (2012), and I have also co-edited a volume on sustainable upland land use (2013). Here in the university I teach not only on the Geography programme but have helped to launch the inter-disciplinary Sustainable Development degree. From 2004 to 2009 I served as a Senate Assessor on the University Court.

My research interests include: environmental management; land use policy and environmental policy analysis, with an emphasis on the Scottish context; evaluating policies for tackling invasive alien species; the renewable energy transition; socio-economic implications of Scottish land reform; wild land and the 'rewilding' movement.

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Charlotte Eve Davies

Charlotte's research focuses on the impacts of parasites and disease on marine populations. Since beginning her studies in 2008, Charlotte has traveled extensively, working with collaborators in the USA and Canada, gaining valuable experience in a range of disease detection methods and learning more about marine management strategies. Her doctorate at the Department of Bioscience, Swansea University (UK) focused on determining the health status of commercially important European crustacean populations; susceptibility to disease, the effects of invasive species and how fisheries closure can impact the health of crustaceans. Her current position at the Reef Systems Unit in Puerto Morelos, Mexico, investigates the effects of crustacean disease on coral reef health. She is passionate about the integration of fishermen and marine scientists for the betterment of fisheries management and a sustainable future.

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Charlotte O'Brien

Senior Lecturer in Law, University of York

I've been awarded an ESRC 'Future Research Leader' grant, with which I'm PI on the EU Rights Project, www.eurightsproject.org.uk - working with EU migrants, Citizens Advice Services, and other advice agencies around the country, providing an advice and advocacy service while conducting an ethnography on the administrative and legal problems encountered. I have documented the effects of the recent welfare changes targeting EU migrants.

The project was described by reviewers as 'groundbreaking', 'tremendously innovative', 'strikingly original' and said 'the applicant’s background makes her possibly the only person of her generation in a position to credibly offer the opportunity to develop this methodology in this kind of context: access to civil justice, in supranational contexts’.

Having volunteered and worked in Citizens Advice Bureaux for over thirteen years, and specialised in EU legal research for eleven years, I have practical as well as academic expertise in UK welfare law, EU law, (particularly EU social law - welfare, free movement, citizenship and equal treatment), human rights law, equality and non-discrimination law (especially disability), the rights of carers, and child poverty.

I've been appointed an 'analytical expert' on the EU Commission's Free Movement and Social Security Coordination network, producing reports and giving litigation advice and suggestions to the Commission. I am also joint cases editor for the Journal of Social Security Law.

My work has been published in key international journals, such as the European Law Review, the Common Market Law Review, the Maastricht Journal of International and Comparative Law, and the Journal of Social Welfare and Family Law.

I've communicated about my research through various media, including the Today Programme on Radio 4, BBC Inside Out, and BBC Breakfast. I have given various public talks, including at the YorkTalks 2016, https://youtu.be/Iz-dY3g-ZAI and in an Open Course lecture series on Law, Government and the Public, 2015.

My PhD in Law (Liverpool) was funded by the AHRC, and focussed on free movement, equal treatment and EU citizenship; during this I took part in two research projects on retirement migration funded by the Spanish Ministry for Employment & Social Affairs and Age Concern. These looked at the access to welfare services for post-retirement EU migrants, particularly UK nationals abroad. My LLM (Leeds) research involved study of the attempts to produce an EU constitution. My work is inherently interdisciplinary; my first degree was a BA in Social & Political Sciences, (Cambridge).

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Chelsea Liu

Dr Chelsea Liu is a Lecturer at the University of Adelaide Business School. Her research interests are in the areas of corporate governance, corporate litigation, mergers & acquisitions, and corporate social responsibility. Chelsea holds Bachelor degrees in Law and Commerce from the University of Adelaide, and a PhD specialising in the corporate governance consequences of lawsuits against public companies. Chelsea is a legal practitioner and has worked in inner-city law firms prior to joining academia.

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Chengwei Liu

Chengwei Liu is an Associate Professor of Strategy and Behavioural Science at Warwick Business School, UK. He is a Cambridge trained PhD who held a fellowship position at Jesus College Oxford. Chengwei's research programme addresses a fundamental question in strategy, innovation and entrepreneurship: should successes be attributed to skill or luck? His research (luckily) won several awards and are published in management and interdisciplinary journals such as Organization Science and PNAS, gaining media coverage worldwide in the New York Times, Financial Times, and BBC. Chengwei has also won multiple research grants and teaching awards.

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July 2 15:00 UTC Released

DKCurrency Reserves

Actual

449.6 Stale

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Previous

451.7 Stale

July 2 13:45 UTC Released

USISM NY Biz Conditions

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50 %

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Previous

48.6 %

January 31 00:00 UTC 813683813683m

ARAnnual Primary Balance*

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2016 bln ARS

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January 31 00:00 UTC 813683813683m

ARAnnual Primary Balance*

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2016 bln ARS

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Bln AR bln ARS

January 22 19:00 UTC 825503825503m

ARTrade Balance

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-1541 %

January 31 00:00 UTC 813683813683m

ARAnnual Primary Balance*

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2016 bln ARS

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Bln AR bln ARS

January 22 19:00 UTC 825503825503m

ARTrade Balance

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Forecast

Previous

-1541 %

January 31 00:00 UTC 813683813683m

ARAnnual Primary Balance*

Actual

Forecast

2016 bln ARS

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Bln AR bln ARS

January 31 00:00 UTC 813683813683m

ARAnnual Primary Balance*

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2016 bln ARS

Previous

Bln AR bln ARS

January 31 00:00 UTC 813683813683m

ARAnnual Primary Balance*

Actual

Forecast

2016 bln ARS

Previous

Bln AR bln ARS

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