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Amy Brown

Amy Brown

Professor of Child Public Health, Swansea University

A psychologist by background, Amy explores psychological, social and cultural influences upon maternal and infant health and wellbeing through pregnancy, birth and the early years.

Amy specialises in research around how babies are fed; whether they are breast or formula fed, how they are introduced to solid foods, and the impact these decisions could have on their long term eating behaviour and weight. In particular, her research focusses on why feeding babies is a public health issue, affected heavily by societal and cultural beliefs and behaviours, and therefore why responsibility for feeding should not lie solely with the mother. Her research seeks to develop interventions to improve infant feeding choices targeted at wider society rather than individual mothers alone.

Amy has a particular interest in how societal perceptions and understanding of normal baby behaviour can affect how babies are fed and cared for in their early months. She seeks to tackle myths around the 'good baby' who sleeps and needs little interaction, and instead promote better support and value for new parents in order for them to have more space to care responsively for their baby and their needs. She has developed a series of animations based on here research findings to help share messages about what is normal for babies, and how we can better support parents
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLoflLgxNjBdyr7i2Zx-ArwTEU2PwXWgf4

Finally, Amy's research examines influences on maternal mental health and wellbeing during pregnancy, birth and the early years. She has published papers exploring the interaction between birth and infant feeding and subsequent maternal well being (including postnatal depression, maternal identity and parenting confidence). She has also examined how messages in baby care books, social media, and parenting forums can improve or damage maternal wellbeing in the early years.

Amy is author to two infant feeding books both published by Pinter and Martin.

Breastfeeding Uncovered: Who really decides how we feed our babies
http://www.pinterandmartin.com/breastfeeding-uncovered.html

Why Starting Solids Matters
http://www.pinterandmartin.com/why-starting-solids-matters.html

Sleep-training and babies: why 'crying it out' is best avoided

Nov 19, 2019 02:45 am UTC| Insights & Views Health

A full nights sleep will be near the top of many parents wish lists. Sleep deprivation is no fun and many parents find themselves turning to baby care books that promise to train their child to sleep through the...

Some baby care books are giving advice that goes against safe infant care guidelines

Jul 07, 2019 15:14 pm UTC| Insights & Views

Becoming a new parent can be one of the most stressful things you ever do. Its normal to feel blindsided between what you thought it would be like, and the reality. But it can lead to all sorts of emotions from panic and...

Promoting but not protecting breastfeeding is destroying mothers' mental health

Oct 09, 2018 13:18 pm UTC| Insights & Views Health

If you believed some newspapers you would think that breastfeeding was inherently bad for maternal mental health. Headlines regularly shout about pressure to breastfeed and breastfeeding bullies making mums feel anxious...

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