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Andrew Linn

Pro-Vice-Chancellor and Dean of Social Sciences and Humanities, University of Westminster

I joined the University of Westminster in February 2016 as Pro Vice-Chancellor and Dean of Social Sciences and Humanities. I am also Professor of Language, History and Society.

My first degree (at Emmanuel College, Cambridge where I was organ scholar) was in English, followed by a Master's degree in General Linguistics and a PhD in the History of Linguistics.

From 2003 I was Professor of the History of Linguistics at the University of Sheffield. In my time at Sheffield I was successively Head of English Language and Linguistics and Director of Research in the Arts and Humanities. I spent the academic year 2007-2008 working at the University of Bergen on a Leverhulme Fellowship, and in 2012 I was visiting professor at the University of Paris 7-Diderot.

I am a Fellow of the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (Det Norske Videnskaps-Akademi) and of the Agder Vitenskapsakademi, a strategic reviewer for the Arts and Humanities Research Council and President of the Henry Sweet Society for the History of Linguistic Ideas.

My current research involves projects and publications on the changing status of English in Europe, language policy-making, the experiences of Nordic emigrants, and the history of applied linguistics.

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Andrew Lonsdale

Research Assistant, London School of Economics and Political Science
Andrew Lonsdale is a Research Assistant at the International Inequalities Institute at the LSE, working with Dr Arun Advani and Dr Andy Summers. His work focuses on the revenue and distributional impacts of potential reforms to capital gains tax.

Andrew holds masters degrees in Economics from the Paris School of Economics and in Public Policy and Administration from the LSE, and completed his undergraduate studies at McMaster University. He previously worked as a tax intern at the OECD's Centre for Tax Policy and Administration and as a research intern at the Center for Research in Economics and Statistics.

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Andrew Lotery

Professor of Ophthalmology, University of Southampton
Andrew Lotery is an ophthalmologist with major research interests in age-related macular degeneration, central serous chorio-retinopathy and inherited retinal diseases. He has been awarded the Nettleship Award for best research published by a UK ophthalmologist in the past 3 years by the Royal College of Ophthalmologists and was listed by the Times as one of the United Kingdom’s top 100 doctors. He has been recognised for his research by the University Hospital Southampton Innovation and Researcher of the Year awards and a Macular Society award. He was editor in chief of the scientific journal, Eye for 10 years and is past Chair of the Scientific Committee of the Royal College of Ophthalmologists. He has served two times as an NIHR Senior Investigator. His research has been funded by the Wellcome Trust, NIHR and eye research charities. He has served as Chair of several national eye research advisory boards for Sight Research UK and Retina UK and sat on research committees for the Medical Research Council and Wellcome Trust.

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Andrew MacDougall

Professor, Integrative Biology, University of Guelph
Our research group examines how global environmental change alters fundamental ecological processes, in natural and managed landscapes

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Andrew Mackintosh

Professor & Head, School of Earth Atmosphere and Environment; expert on glaciers and ice sheets, Monash University
Andrew is Head of the School of Earth, Atmosphere and Environment. He is known for his research on the large-scale interactions between glaciers, ice sheets and the climate system. He has worked on the Antarctic Ice Sheet and New Zealand glaciers, as well as the Greenland Ice Sheet and glaciers in Iceland and South America. His work has led to new understanding of glacier response to anthropogenic and natural climate variability, as well as providing new insights into the physical mechanisms that are causing rapid and potentially irreversible changes in ice sheets today.

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Andrew Maynard

Andrew Maynard is a Professor in the School for the Future of Innovation in Society at Arizona State University, and Director of the Risk Innovation Lab. His research and professional activities focus on risk innovation, and the responsible development and use of emerging technologies. He is especially interested in novel approaches to understanding and addressing risk; effective approaches to developing socially responsive, responsible and beneficial technologies; understanding and responding to the increasingly complex couplings between converging technologies and society; and effective science communication and engagement – particularly through social media. Through the ASU Risk Innovation Lab, he is exploring novel ways of understanding, thinking about and acting on risk from an entrepreneurial and innovation perspective. He is interested in understanding how risk as a “threat to value” shapes evolving risk landscapes around emerging technologies – especially where the value under threat is social, cultural and personal – and how creativity and serendipity can reveal new approaches to navigating these landscapes.

Andrew is widely published in the academic press and in public media. His peer review papers stretch from physics and toxicology to risk perception, governance, and policy. He also contributes to a regular column in the journal Nature Nanotechnology (where he writes on emerging ideas and research around nanotechnology and risk), and writes for the column “Edge of Innovation” on the news and commentary website The Conversation. In addition, he directs and produces the YouTube science education channel “Risk Bites”.

Andrew’s science training is in physics – specializing in nanoparticle analysis – and for many years he conducted and led research on aerosol exposure in occupational settings. In the early 2000’s he became increasingly involved in guiding US federal initiatives supporting nanotechnology research and development, and in addressing potential risks. In 2005 he became Chief Science Advisor for the Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies (and later the Synthetic Biology Project) at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and for five years helped inform national and global initiatives addressing the responsible development of nanotechnology. Over this period, he became increasingly interested in science communication and science policy, and began working closely with academics, policy makers, industry, non-government organizations, and journalists, on science-informed decision making. This interest continued between 2010 - 2015 as Director of the University of Michigan Risk Science Center, and Chair of the Environmental Health Sciences Department. In 2015 he joined the faculty of the School for the Future of Innovation in Society at Arizona State University to continue his work and collaborations on socially responsible, responsible and beneficial research and development.

In the course of his work, Andrew has testified before congressional committees, has served on National Academy panels, and has worked closely with organizations such as the World Economic Forum and the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) that promote public-private partnerships. He is currently co-chair of the World Economic Forum Global Agenda Council on Nanotechnology, and on the Board of Trustees of ILSI North America. He is also a member of the National Academies of Science Committee on the Science of Science Communication, and advises the science education/engagement program “I’m a Scientist”. While at the University of Michigan he was involved with the innovative science communication training program RELATE, and continues to serve as an advisor to the initiative. In 2015 he was awarded the Society of Toxicology Public Communication Award.

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Andrew McNeill

Assistant Professor in Psychology , Northumbria University, Newcastle
Dr McNeill is a Senior Lecturer in Psychology and has been working at Northumbria University since 2013. His work explores social psychological factors in diverse contexts including intergroup conflict, design of social media, and public health. He is a strong advocate of mixed-methods approaches to psychology.

He did his PhD in the discursive psychology of post-conflict victimhood at Queen's University Belfast (2010-2013).

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Andrew Milne

Lecturer in Philosophy, The University of Western Australia

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Andrew Monaghan

Scientist Research Applications Laboratory in Climate Science & Applications Program, University Corporation for Atmospheric Research

Andrew Monaghan employs computer models to study weather and climate at regional scales, with an emphasis on climate change, and the impacts of climate on human health. He is currently involved in a project to study the influence of climate on human plague transmission Uganda, where factors such as temperature and precipitation play an important role in determining risk. He is also interested in Antarctic climate variability. Monaghan works in NCAR’s Research Applications Laboratory.

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Andrew Murphy1

Professor of Political Science, University of Michigan
Andrew Murphy joins the Political Science Department after appointments at Virginia Commonwealth University, Rutgers University, Valparaiso University, and the University of Chicago. His research takes up the intersections between politics and religion, in both historical and contemporary contexts. He is particularly interested in the emergence of religious liberty and liberty of conscience in early modern England and America, and the ongoing ramifications of these debates as they continue to unsettle American politics.

In recent years, Murphy has focused on the life, career and political thought of William Penn, a figure who brought political theory and practice together in the early modern British Atlantic. He is the author of William Penn: A Life (Oxford, 2019) and Liberty, Conscience, and Toleration: The Political Thought of William Penn (Oxford, 2016); and co-editor (with John Smolenski) of The Worlds of William Penn (Rutgers, 2019). An edition of Penn's political writings, for the Cambridge Texts in the History of Political Thought series, appeared in 2021. His work on Penn continues the exploration of these topics begun in his first book, Conscience and Community: Revisiting Toleration and Religious Dissent in Early Modern England and America (Penn State, 2001). His more contemporary interests are reflected in his co-authored book (with David S. Gutterman, of Willamette University) Political Religion and Religious Politics: Navigating Identities in the United States (Routledge, 2015), and his Prodigal Nation: Moral Decline and Divine Punishment from New England to 9/11 (Oxford, 2008). He brings together historical and contemporary political reflection in “The Past and Present (and Future?) Politics of Religious Liberty,” The Forum 17 (2019): 45-67.

Murphy's current research continues to bring together the political and the religious. His next project explores the concept of political martyrdom and the ways in which studying politically-charged deaths can help us make sense of the complex interplay of death, religion, politics, collective memory, and symbolic power.

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Andrew Nickson

Honorary Reader in the Department of International Development, University of Birmingham
I have extensive worldwide experience of teaching, research and consultancy on public administration reform, decentralisation, and the regulation of privatised public utilities. My most recent research has focussed on decentralisation and conflict prevention, the management of urban water supply, and the relationship between language, governance and citizen participation. I am a regular writer for several subscription-only publications, including the Economist Intelligence Unit, Oxford Analytica and IHS Markit. I also write for the German Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Since 2011 I have been external trainer for the Peace and Security Division of the United Nations System Staff College (UNSSC) in Turin, Italy, for which I teach face-to-face courses on the role of decentralisation and local governance in the peacebuilding process of post-conflict countries (Kenya, Uganda, Somalia, Yemen, Bangla Desh, Ethiopia) as well as at UN HQ in New York. In 2013/14 I wrote a distance learning (DL) version of the course for the UNSSC and to date have taught 14 editions (most recently in April 2021).

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Andrew Norton

I've worked at the Open University since 1992 and am now Professor of Astrophysics Education in the Department of Physical Sciences. I'm a former Vice President of the Royal Astronomical Society and am Editor-in-Chief of the journal Astronomical Review.

My research interests are in various aspects of time domain astrophysics with a current focus on stellar photometry from wide field surveys to investigate close binary stars. I carry out research on all sorts of variable stars, including white dwarfs, neutron stars and black holes, and I edit the International Exoplanet Newsletter. I am co-lead for the materials and learning objects for the PLATO Education and Public Outreach Coordination Office in support of ESA's mission to discover rocky exoplanets in Earth-like orbits around Sun-like stars.

I am passionate about outreach and public engagement - being both a STEMnet ambassador and a public engagement ambassador for the National Coordinating Centre for Public Engagement. I wrote a story book about Exoplanets for young children called "Oogle-Flip and the planet adventure". I also co-wrote the series of "60 second adventures in Astronomy" and am a frequent Academic Consultant for OU/BBC astronomy co-productions,

My Erdos-Bacon-Sabbath number is 13.

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Andrew Page

Pro Vice-Chancellor (Research), The University of Western Australia
Andrew Page is Professor of Psychological Science at the University of Western Australia. He is currently Pro Vice-Chancellor (Research) and director of the Suicide Prevention and Reslience Research Centre (SPARRC). He worked as a clinical psychologist in the Clinical Unit for Anxiety and Depression (CRUfAD) and at UWA was co-director of the Robin Winkler Clinic where he was instrumental in developing the clinic’s individual and group treatment programs as a model of science-informed practice. For over 25 years he has been research consultant to the private psychiatric sector, including Perth Clinic’s Clinical Improvement Team. As part of Perth Clinic’s Clinical Improvement Team he has developed the first daily symptom monitoring system for inpatient psychiatric patients. He is director of the suicide prevention organisation, Mates in Construction WA and is a member of their national Research Reference Group. a past National President of the Australian Association for Cognitive and Behaviour Therapy and the inaugural winner of the Tracy Goodall Early Career Award in recognition of innovation in research. Andrew is currently Associate Editor with Psychotherapy Research and has published over 160 research papers, books, and book chapters. His books include the co-authored the text "Clinical psychology for trainees: Foundations of a science-informed practice" and he has been awarded teaching fellowships for his work in the training of clinical psychologists and developing training opportunities in rural and remote settings..

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Andrew Pauling

Research Fellow in Physics, University of Otago
I am currently a Research Fellow in the Department of Physics at the University of Otago in Dunedin, New Zealand. Previously I completed my PhD in Atmospheric Sciences: Advanced Data Science at the University of Washington in Seattle, USA. My PhD was partly supported by a Fulbright New Zealand Science and Innovation Award.

My research has focused on studying the climate of Antarctica and the Arctic through the use of global climate models. I have published research on the impact of freshwater from Antarctic ice shelves on Antarctic sea ice, the effect of changes in Antarctic ice sheet topography on climate, the efficacy of Arctic sea ice geoengineering, and the impact of volcanic eruptions on polar climate. I am also interested in open source software and software development for studying climate. While completing my PhD I did an internship at the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence where I was part of a team rewriting an atmosphere model in Python, which allowed the model to run on CPUs or GPUs without changes to the model code.

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Andrew Pollard

Professor of Paediatric Infection and Immunity, University of Oxford

Current research activities include clinical trials of new and improved vaccines for children and adults, surveillance of invasive bacterial diseases and penumococcal vaccine impact in children in Nepal, studies of cellular and humoral immune responses to glycoconjugate and typhoid vaccines, and development of a serogroup B meningococcal vaccine.
ANDREW J POLLARD, FRCPCH PhD FMedSci, is Professor of Paediatric Infection and Immunity at the University of Oxford, Director of the Oxford Vaccine Group, Fellow of St Cross College and Honorary Consultant Paediatrician at the Children’s Hospital, Oxford, UK. He obtained his medical degree at St Bartholomew’s Hospital Medical School, University of London in 1989 and trained in Paediatrics at Birmingham Children’s Hospital, UK, specialising in Paediatric Infectious Diseases at St Mary’s Hospital, London, UK and at British Columbia Children’s Hospital, Vancouver, Canada. He obtained his PhD at St Mary’s Hospital, London, UK in 1999 studying immunity to Neisseria meningitidis in children and proceeded to work on anti-bacterial innate immune responses in children in Canada before returning to his current position at the University of Oxford, UK in 2001. He received the Bill Marshall award of the European Society for Paediatric Infectious Disease (ESPID) in 2013 for his contribution to the specialty and the ESPID Distinguished Award for Education & Communication in 2015.

He chaired the UK’s National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) meningitis guidelines development group, and the NICE topic expert group developing quality standards for management of meningitis and meningococcal septicaemia. He chairs the UK Department of Health’s Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation and the European Medicines Agency scientific advisory group on vaccines and is a member of WHO’s SAGE. His research includes the design, development and clinical evaluation of vaccines including those for meningococcal disease and enteric fever and leads studies using a human challenge model of (para)typhoid. He has a particular interest in the development of B cell immunity in early childhood. He runs surveillance for invasive bacterial diseases and studies the impact of pneumococcal vaccines in children in Nepal and leads a project on burden and transmission of typhoid in Nepal, Bangladesh and Malawi. He has supervised 23 PhD students and his publications include over 300 manuscripts and books on various topics in paediatrics and infectious diseases.

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Andrew Rettenmaier

Executive Associate Director of the Private Enterprise Research Center, Texas A&M University
Andrew J. Rettenmaier, PhD is the executive associate director at the Private Enterprise Research Center at Texas A&M University.

He received his Ph.D. in Economics from Texas A&M University. His research focuses on income and wealth inequality, labor economics, health care policy, and elderly entitlement programs. He co-authored The Economics of Medicare Reform, W. E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research and The Diagnosis and Treatment of Medicare, AEI Press. He was an editor of Medicare Reform: Issues and Answers, University of Chicago Press. He has been co-principal investigator on several research grants and has published numerous public policy monographs and academic articles.

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Andrew Rogers

PhD student, The University of Queensland
My research focuses on the impact of alien birds on native wildlife in Australia, and I have lived and done field work in California, South Africa, Madagascar, the UK, Borneo and Australia studying how animals use altered habitats.

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Andrew Rozefelds

Adjunct Assoc Professor Central Queensland University and Principal Curator Geosciences Queensland Museum, CQUniversity Australia
Dr Andrew Rozefelds is Head of Geosciences Program in the Queensland Museum. Andrew rejoined the Queensland Museum in 2011, after working in the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery as the Curator of Botany and then Deputy Director of Collections and Research. He previously worked at the Queensland Museum from 1977 to 1991. In 1991 he left the Museum to undertake further studies in Adelaide; and then completed a PhD in botany at the University of Melbourne, with one year spent at the University of Zurich, Switzerland. In 2016 he was awarded a Smithsonian-Queensland Fellowship to work at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History and 2020 he was awarded a Churchill Fellowship for travel in 2021, which he is yet to take up.

He has written over 90 peer reviewed and popular articles. His current research interests involve studying the origins, evolution and history of the modern Australian flora. Andrew has used various experimental techniques to study living and fossil plant material, including synchrotron imaging at the Australian Synchrotron and MicroCT analysis. He has also published papers on fossil vertebrates and invertebrates, modern plant systematics and weed sciences, biographical research and other areas. He has described over 14 new species of living plants and a similar number of fossil plants. His current research is focussed on gaining a better understanding of the impacts of vulcanicity on the modern Australian flora.

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Andrew Schmulow

Andy was admitted to a BA Honours LLB in the University of the Witwatersrand, and a PhD in the University of Melbourne. He is an Advocate of the High Court of South Africa, and the Principal of Clarity Prudential Regulatory Consulting, Pty Ltd. He is also a former Senior Research Associate in the School of Law, University of Melbourne. He is currently a Visiting Researcher in the Oliver Schreiner School of Law, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, and in the Centre for International Trade, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul. From July 2016 he will take up a position as a Senior Lecturer in the Faculty of Law, in The University of Western Australia, Perth.

You can access his research at
http://ssrn.com/author=2352825
https://wits.academia.edu/DrAndySchmulow
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Dr_Andy_Schmulow

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Andrew Shennan

Professor of Obstetrics at King’s College London and chair of the FIGO Preterm Birth Committee (2012-23)., King's College London

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Andrew Smith

Reader in Tourism and Events, University of Westminster

I am a Reader in Tourism and Events and have been at the University of Westminster since 2004. Previously, I held lectureships at the University of Kent and at Sheffield Hallam University. I read Geography at Cambridge University in the mid 1990s and then moved to Sheffield where I studied for a PhD in a programme of research entitled 'Reimaging the City'. This PhD was funded jointly by both Sheffield Hallam University and the University of Sheffield.

I currently lead the MA elective in Mega-Events and the MA Dissertation module. I also undertake research supervision at MA and PhD levels. I lead two undergraduate modules on the BA Tourism and Events programmes - Eventful Cities and Comparative Study. I also lead the annual final year field trip to Malta.

Over the past five years I have written on various urban themes. My first book 'Events and Urban Regeneration' was published by Routledge in 2012; and my second 'Events in the City: Using Public Spaces as Event Venues' was published by Routledge in 2016. My research has also been published in leading journals including: Urban Studies, European Planning Studies, European Urban and Regional Studies, Annals of Tourism Research and Tourism Geographies.

There are three main strands to my work. The first is events, in particular their role as tools for the regeneration and revitalisation of cities. The second is place image, drawing heavily on my doctoral work. The third is urban tourism, especially the role of iconic projects and monumental urbanism in tourism. This work is focused mainly on UK cities, but I have also published research on Oslo, Barcelona and Valletta.

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Andrew Smith

I teach about international business and organizational change. My core research interests centre on the evolution of business and financial institutions, the development of international business, corporate governance, and political economy. Another strand of my research looks at the impact of socially-constructed identities on firms. An additional research area is the relationship between business and the natural environment. Empirically, my research is on firms that have operated in the North Atlantic region and in East Asia. My research is informed by diverse theories, including concepts taken from strategic management, behavioural economics, post-colonial theory, International Political Economy, and Austrian economics. My preferred research methods are qualitative and include the use of corporate archives.

My first book, which was published in 2008, was on the role of British financiers in the genesis of the Canadian constitution. This book was an outgrowth of my PhD work, which was conducted at a Canadian university. My second book was a co-edited collection on the history of entrepreneurship in Canada. My third book, which was published in 2014, is an edited collection on globalization and Canadian business that aimed to use to historical evidence to test various claims about optimum policy mix for nations seeking to manage their relationship to the global economy. My more recent research has included articles on the history of Unilever and HSBC, race relations within multinational firms, the evolution of cashless payment technologies in Hong Kong, and the relationship between corporate governance and contemporary debates about economic inequality. I have also published articles and book chapters on topics such as the taxation, fisheries regulation, ethnicity and international capital flows, race and business, entrepreneurship, and banking regulation history. I am currently editing a book on the impact of the First World War on the strategies of international firms. It will be published by Routledge in early 2016.

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Andrew Stewart

John Bray Professor of Law, University of Adelaide

Andrew is the John Bray Professor of Law. His main interests lie in employment law and workplace relations, contract law and intellectual property. His most recent publications include: the fifth edition of his popular text Stewart's Guide to Employment Law; the fifth edition of Intellectual Property in Australia, written with Philip Griffith, Judith Bannister and Adam Liberman; and Multinational Human Resource Management and the Law, co-authored with a group of distinguished international scholars.

Besides working as a consultant with the national law firm Piper Alderman, Andrew has provided expert advice to the International Labour Organisation, to Federal and State governments in Australia and to a wide range of other organisations. His recent work has included a ground-breaking study of the prevalence, nature and regulation of unpaid work experience, commissioned by the Fair Work Ombudsman and co-authored by Rosemary Owens; and a major research report on equal remuneration claims for the Fair Work Commission, along with Robyn Layton QC and Meg Smith. Prior to that, he advised the federal government on the drafting and structure of the Fair Work legislation.

Andrew is the President of the Australian Labour Law Association, a fellow of the Australian Academy of Law and an Editor of the Australian Journal of Labour Law. He has previously been Chair of the Committee of Australian Law Deans and President of the Industrial Relations Society of South Australia. Before taking up his current post he worked at the University of Sydney and at Flinders University, where he was Dean of Law from 1994-1997.

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Andrew Street

Andrew Street is a Professor of Health Economics and Director of the Health Policy team in the Centre for Health Economics and Director of the Economics of Social and Health Care Research Unit (ESHCRU), a joint collaboration with the Personal Social Services Research Unit (PSSRU) at the London School of Economics and the University of Kent. He is an editor of the Journal of Health Economics, and currently serves as a board member on the NIHR Health Services and Delivery Research programme Commissioning Board Researcher-led (since 2009) and the Norwegian HSR Board (since 2011), and as chair of the Welsh Health Economics Support Service Advisory Group. He is an external affiliate to the Department of Business and Economics at the University of Southern Denmark.

Andrew's research covers measurement of health system productivity, evaluation of activity based funding mechanisms, analysis of organisational efficiency, and critical appraisal of health policy.

He has a MSc in Health Economics (1990), a MA in Public Administration and Public Policy (2000) and a PhD in Economics (2002), all awarded by the University of York. After completing his MSc, Andrew spent three years in Australia working at the National Centre for Health Program Evaluation, Monash University and the Victorian Department of Health and Community Services. This was followed by a five-year spell with the York Health Economics Consortium. He joined the Centre for Health Economics in April 1999. From 1999-2003 he held a special training fellowship awarded by the Medical Research Council and Northern and Yorkshire Region. In 2005 he worked part time in the Delivery Analytical Team in the English Department of Health.

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Andrew Stumpf

I have an M.A. and Ph.D. in Philosophy from University of Waterloo, along with an M.T.S. degree from Conrad Grebel College, and am ABD (all-but-defended) in a second doctoral program (Th.D.) in Theology at St. Michael's College in Toronto. I am the principal investigator on two SSHRC grant-funded research projects in end-of-life care ethics, and have published two books and a handful of articles. I have been teaching at St. Jerome's University and the University of Waterloo since 2008.

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Andrew Thomas2

Lecturer in Middle East Studies, Deakin University
Andrew is a lecturer in Middle East Studies and International Relations at Deakin University. He teaches units on the critical issues in the Middle East, the Arab-Israeli conflict and global governance. His upcoming book "Iran and the West: a non-Western approach to foreign policy" (2024) explores how non-Western perspectives on the Middle East and beyond can improve our understanding of intractible conflict.

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Andrew Vanderburg

Assistant Professor of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
Prof. Andrew Vanderburg’s research focuses on studying exoplanets, or planets which orbit stars other than the Sun. Andrew is interested in developing cutting-edge techniques and methods to discover new planets outside of our solar system, and studying the planets we find to learn their detailed properties.

In recent years, astronomers have found that planets the size of Earth are common in our galaxy, but little is known about their characteristics. Are these planets mostly rocky like the Earth, or do they have thick gaseous atmospheres like Uranus and Neptune? From which elements and materials are these planets built, and are their geologies similar to our own planet’s?

Andrew and his team tackle these problems by conducting astronomical observations using facilities on Earth like the Magellan Telescopes in Chile as well as space-based observatories like the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite and the James Webb Space Telescope. Once the data from these telescopes are in hand, Andrew’s team specializes in developing new analysis methods that help extract as much scientific value as possible. Currently, Andrew’s group is exploring the use of machine learning — especially deep neural networks — in exoplanet detection to both increase the sensitivity and efficiency of planet searches. Eventually, through this work, Andrew hopes to help answer questions like “Are the planets orbiting other stars throughout the galaxy anything like the worlds in our Solar system?” and “Could any of these planets be hospitable to life like the Earth?”.

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Andrew W. Moore

Dean, School of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University

I am the Dean of the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University. My background is in statistical machine learning, artificial intelligence, robotics, and statistical computation for large volumes of data. I love algorithms and statistics. In the case of robotics, which I also love, I only have expertise in decision and control algorithms. I suck at hardware and mechanical design. When I stand near a robot, it breaks.

I have worked in the areas of robot control, manufacturing, reinforcement learning, algorithms for astrophysics, algorithms for detection and surveillance of terror threats, internet advertising, internet click-through prediction, ecommerce, and logistics for same day delivery.

I am passionate about the impact of technology (algorithms, cloud architectures, statistics, robotics, language technologies, machine learning, computational biology, artificial intelligence and software development processes) on the future of society. We are lucky to live in such an exciting time of change. I am adamant that the Pittsburgh region in general, and Carnegie Mellon more specifically, are right in the center of all this change.

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Andrew Weaver

Professor, School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of Victoria
Dr. Andrew J. Weaver is a Professor in the School of Earth and Ocean Sciences at the University of Victoria. He was also the Canada Research Chair in Climate Modelling and Analysis until he was elected as a BC Green Party MLA in the 2013 BC Provincial Election representing the riding of Oak Bay-Gordon Head. In 2015 Dr. Weaver assumed leadership of the BC Green Party, leading them to an historic election result in the 2017 provincial election with three elected MLAs holding the balance of power in an NDP minority government. He returned to UVic after completing two terms as an MLA.

Dr. Weaver received his B.Sc (Mathematics and Physics) from the University of Victoria in 1983, a Master of Advanced Studies in Mathematics from Cambridge University in 1984, and a PhD in Applied Mathematics from the University of British Columbia in 1987. He has authored or coauthored over 200 peer-reviewed papers in climate, meteorology, oceanography, earth science, policy, education and anthropology journals. He was a Lead Author in the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th scientific assessments. He was the Chief Editor of the Journal of Climate from 2005-2009.

Dr. Weaver is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, Canadian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society, American Meteorological Society, American Geophysical Union and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Over the years he has received a number of awards including the NSERC-Steacie, Killam and Guggenheim Fellowships and the CMOS President’s Prize, the Royal Society of Canada Miroslaw Romanowski Medal and the A.G. Huntsman Award for Excellence in Marine Science. In 2008 he was appointed to the Order of British Columbia and in 2014 he received an honourary D.Sc. degree from McMaster University.

For his work developing British Columbia’s CleanBC economic plan collaboratively with the BC NDP, he and the Minister of Environment, George Heyman, received 2020 Clean 16 and Clean 50 awards for outstanding contributions to sustainable development and clean capitalism in Canada.

His book, Keeping our Cool: Canada in a Warming World was published by Viking Canada in September 2008. His second book, Generation Us: The Challenge of Global Warming was published by Raven books in 2011.

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Andrew White

I am currently an Associate Professor of Digital Media & Creative Industries in the School of International Communications and Research Director for the Faculty of Arts & Education at the University of Nottingham Ningbo China, where I have worked since 2007. In 2015 I assumed the interim directorship of the AHRC Centre for Digital Copyright and IP Research in China. I have published numerous journal articles and book chapters on digital media, the creative industries and Northern Irish politics. My first book, Digital Media and Society: transforming economics, politics and social practices, was released in paperback, hardback and e-book by Palgrave Macmillan in 2014 and a Portuguese translation will be published soon.

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Andrew Wiebe

PhD Student, Information, University of Toronto
M.A. Medieval Studies, M.I. Archives and Records Management and Information Systems and Design.
Current PhD student in Information Studies (Critical Indigenous Studies, Queer Studies, and Archival Theory).

I am a queer, Michif scholar whose research interrogates how to ethically build Indigenous and queer data into Digital Humanities projects (virtual exhibits/maps). I interrogate queering and Indigenizing data management and data mobilization through archival activities such as counter-archiving, radical recordkeeping, and community information infrastructures. I want to take traditional archival approaches to acquisition and preservation and building community into the continuum of traditional archival space. These approaches emphasize the living cultural and community responsibilities that archivists have to actively address archival inequalities and to curate and deliver information in an ethical and meaningful way for said community that adheres to OCAP principles (https://fnigc.ca/ocap-training).

Member of the Ontario Library Association's Indigenous Advisory Council
Volunteer at the LGBTQ2+ ArQuives
Associated with Old Books New Science - medieval studies lab
Associated with the Technoscience Research Unit

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Andrew Wilson

Andrew Wilson is a Senior Lecturer in Criminology. Andrew's research interests include: drugs (all aspects), subcultures and gangs, violence (all aspects including terrorism, state sponsored and genocide), inequality and crime, criminological theory, young people, crime and justice, social control and policing.

His book Northern soul: music, drugs and subcultural identity was published in 2007.

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Andrew Wood

PhD Candidate, Interdisciplinary Bioscience Doctoral Training Centre, University of Oxford
Having finished my undergraduate in Biological Sciences in 2019, I now explore the relationship between climate and quality in perennial crops, seeking to develop new models to predict and help mitigate the impact of climate change on agriculture. I use a range of techniques to explore weather and quality, trying to understand not just how much of everything there will be, but how good it will become. To do this I want to understand the relationships between weather and crops at a range of levels, from the molecular to the phenomenological.

Come follow my adventures on instagram: @connectingvinestowines

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Andrew C. Patterson

Assistant Professor of Sociology, MacEwan University
I am a tenured professor (currently Assistant level) of Sociology. I received my PhD from the University of British Columbia. Thus far I have published 13 peer-review articles in well-regarded journals, such as Social Science & Medicine, Health & Place, and the International Journal of Comparative Sociology. My research focuses on the political determinants of health, most recently on cancer risk especially. However, it has become clear that the economy is an essential consideration when connecting politics to health.Population health is an essential measure of how well societies are doing, but a bigger picture is needed for a more complete understanding of how societies can create the best health. My research portfolio is among the minority that explore all three fundamental areas - politics, economy, AND population health.

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Andrew J Constable

Adviser, Antarctica and Marine Systems, Science & Policy, University of Tasmania
Specialising in:
Antarctic and marine systems, science and policy;
Climate change impacts, resilience & decision-making

Brief history of roles:
Leader, Southern Ocean ecosystems research - Australian Antarctic Division; Antarctic Climate & Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre (16 yrs)
Australian Representative to Scientific Committee (& alternate Commissioner), Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (19 yrs)
Co-Convenor (lead), Marine Ecosystem Assessment for Southern Ocean
Lead Author, IPCC Working Group 2: Decision making, Polar regions (co-lead), Summary for Policy Makers
Co-Chair, Southern Ocean Observing System

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