Menu

Search

Andrew Biankin

Professor and Regius Chair of Surgery, Director of Translational Research Centre, University of Glasgow

Andrew Biankin is a surgeon-scientist whose research goals are to improve outcomes for individuals with pancreatic cancer through the development of early detection and novel therapeutic strategies based on molecular phenotyping and the delineation and implementation of biomarkers that facilitate clinical decision-making. He contributes to the International Cancer Genome Consortium through extensively characterising the genomic, transcriptomic and epigenomic aberrations in pancreatic cancer, and is extending this knowledge to a personalized model of cancer care, where molecular characteristics guide treatment decisions.

  More

Less

Andrew Biro

Professor, Politics, Acadia University
I am a Professor in the department of Politics at Acadia University. I also teach in Acadia's Environmental and Sustainability Studies, and Social and Political Thought programs. My teaching and research interests are at the intersections of critical theory, environmental politics, political economy, and media/cultural studies.

  More

Less

Andrew Blick

Dr. Blick's main areas of interest are the constitutional future of the UK, the contemporary significance of Magna Carta, the Civil Service, special advisers, and the office of Prime Minister. He uses an historical perspective to asses contemporary issues.

Before his academic appointment Dr Blick had extensive experience working for think tanks, in the UK Parliament and as an administrative assistant at No.10 Downing Street. Dr. Blick has acted as an adviser to democratic reform groups in countries including Ukraine and Turkey; and to the International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance in Stockholm. He has carried out consultancy work for the United Nations Development Programme, European Commission, European Parliament, and UK National Audit Office. Since 2010 he has been research fellow to the first ever parliamentary inquiry into the possibility of introducing a written constitution for the UK, being carried out by the House of Commons Political and Constitutional Reform Committee.

  More

Less

Andrew Bloeser

Associate Professor of Political Science; Director, Center for Political Participation, Allegheny College
I am an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Allegheny College in Meadville, PA. Before coming to Allegheny College, I completed my B.A. at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point and my Ph.D. at the University of Illinois. My research and teaching interests lie primarily in political behavior, participation, and mobilization.

As a scholar, my research is motivated by a commitment to the ideals of participatory democratic theory. More specifically, my research examines the inherent challenges of participatory democracy and seeks strategies for overcoming these challenges. One of my current projects examines the challenges of mobilizing citizens for collective action. Another examines the challenges of communicating accurate policy information to citizens.

My teaching similarly combines a focus on participatory democracy with my interests in American politics and citizen behavior. Courses I teach include political psychology, politics and the news media, and direct action organizing (social movements and community organizing).

My commitment to participatory democracy also extends beyond my academic work. Prior to joining the faculty at Allegheny College, I worked as a community organizer for the Champaign County Health Care Consumers (CCHCC) where I contributed to campaigns addressing health care and environmental justice concerns.

  More

Less

Andrew Bubak

Assistant Research Professor of Neurology, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus
I am a neurovirologist interested in understanding viral-contributions to multi-system disease states including Alzheimer’s disease, cardio- and cerebrovascular disorders, diabetes, and cancer. I generate large datasets derived from patient samples/clinical data and apply complex bioinformatic analyses to produce meaningful, clinically translatable information such as biomarker and drug target discovery. My research at the level of Principal Investigator or Co-Investigator has been awarded over $17.5 mil from the National Institute of Health (NIH) and resulted in the development of national and international patents for novel drug discoveries to treat debilitating diseases.

  More

Less

Andrew Carr

Research Fellow, Strategic and Defence Studies Centre - Australian National University, Co-Editor of the journal Security Challenges , Editor - Centre of Gravity Policy paper series

  More

Less

Andrew Chapados

PhD Student, Philosophy, Sociology, Social Justice, University of Windsor
I am a first year PhD student at the University of Windsor in the Department of Sociology and Criminology. My research areas of interest include Immigration & Refugees, LGBTQ+ studies, and Faith Advocacy.

I have served as a Pastor since 1995. I have enjoyed working with many newcomers to Canada here in Windsor Ontario

  More

Less

Andrew Cheng

Postdoctoral Researcher, Linguistics, Simon Fraser University
I am a linguist who writes about the intersections of language, social identity, and film and media. I’m particularly interested in the linguistics of humor, language and accents in film, and representations of race and sexuality. I’ve published in The Chronicle of Higher Education and Babel: The Language Magazine, in addition to academic journals (including Daedalus, Amerasia Journal, and
American Speech).

  More

Less

Andrew Chubb

Senior Lecturer in Chinese Politics and International Relations, Lancaster University
Andrew Chubb (朱波) researches the relationship between Chinese public opinion and PRC foreign policy, and its implications for international politics in East Asia. A graduate of the University of Western Australia, his doctoral dissertation examined the complex and evolving linkages between Chinese popular nationalism and government policy in the South China Sea. In 2012 he initiated a survey project to measure Mainland Chinese citizens' views of maritime disputes, and a blog providing translations and analysis of Chinese discourse on contentious foreign policy issues (southseaconversations.wordpress.com (link is external)).

Beyond this core focus on maritime disputes and public opinion, Andrew's research interests include strategic communication, hybridity, and Chinese Communist Party history, with publications examining the 1978-1979 Democracy Wall movement, China's shanzhai culture, military propaganda in the internet era, and the role of foreigners on PRC television. His articles can be found in the Journal of Contemporary China, Pacific Affairs, Information, Communication & Society, Foreign Policy, East Asia Forum and elsewhere.

He has a blog at https://southseaconversations.wordpress.com, and a Twitter feed @zhubochubo

  More

Less

Andrew Coombs

Teaching Assistant Professor, Memorial University of Newfoundland
Dr. Andrew Coombs is a Teaching Assistant Professor at Memorial University (Newfoundland & Labrador). Andrew’s research programme focuses on understanding the factors shaping early career teachers’ assessment practices and assessment learning needs. He teaches courses at both the undergraduate and graduate level including research design, quantitative research, curriculum theory, and classroom assessment.

  More

Less

Andrew Cumbers

Before moving to Glasgow, I worked at the Universities of Durham, Middlesex and Aberdeen as a researcher, lecturer in economic geography and in economic development.

My research interests include economic geography, urban and regional development, public ownership, economic democracy and employment relations.

  More

Less

Andrew Denovan

Senior Lecturer in Psychology, University of Huddersfield
Dr Andrew Denovan is a Senior Lecturer in Psychology at the University of Huddersfield. His research primarily centres on aspects of differential psychology, including personality traits (e.g., Dark Triad, resilience). To this end, Andrew has an active interest in the development and evaluation of psychological measures, and research methods including psychometrics and statistical modelling. This has resulted in a number of recent publications focusing on the evaluation of psychological scales. His research is also concerned with wellbeing, stress, and psychopathology. Andrew possesses a strong publication record and a good record of knowledge exchange. He is also certified with the British Psychological Society as a Test User of Ability (formerly Level A) and Personality (formerly Level B).

  More

Less

Andrew Dickerson

Assistant Professor of Mechanical, Aerospace and Biomedical Engineering, University of Tennessee
I am an NSF CAREER award recipient and fluid dynamicist with expertise in the mechanics of interfaces and interested in the biomechanics of animal locomotion. My work in these areas has generated broad interest across the fields of engineering, biology and robotics, resulting in publications in a number in high-impact interdisciplinary journals such as the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Journal of the Royal Society Interface, as well as popular journals such as Physics of Fluids.

Over the years, my research has also played a role in educating the public in science and engineering. I have been an invited guest on numerous television and radio shows to discuss my research, including Good Morning America, National Public Radio, The Weather Channel, and Discovery Channel.

  More

Less

Andrew Dilley

I grew up on the Kent-East Sussex border near Tunbridge Wells. I read for a BA in Modern History between 1997 and 2000, and an M.St in Historical Research in 2000-2001, both at Wadham College, Oxford. After a year out, I studied for my doctorate at the same institution, finishing in 2006. From September 2006 until August 2008 I lectured in Imperial and Commonwealth History at King's College London. I joined Aberdeen as a Lecturer, securing promotion in 2013.

My research and teaching focus on the history of the British empire and particularly the economics, politics, and culture of the Empire-Commonwealth. I have published particularly on London finance and empire, and am now moving to study business trade and empire, supported by an AHRC Early Career Fellowship on 'Commerce and the Commonwealth'.

  More

Less

Andrew Dong

Research Affiliate, Microbiology, University of Sydney
-Investigating the unique antimicrobial properties of Australian honey in Prof. Dee Carter's laboratory
-A researcher on the Australian honeypot ant (Camponotus inflatus)

  More

Less

Andrew Fagan

Co-Director of Postgraduate Studies, Human Rights Centre, University of Essex

Dr Andrew Fagan (BS.c (Hons.), MA, Ph.D.) has been teaching human rights at Essex since 1998. He has occupied several positions within the Human Rights Centre, including; Deputy Director, Research Director, Director of Academic Studies and is currently Director of Postgraduate Studies.

Andrew has extensive multi-disciplinary teaching experience and interests, spanning the theory and practice of human rights. His research principally focuses upon normative issues in the political philosophy of liberalism and is actively researching in the emerging field of human rights and cultural diversity.

Andrew has taught and lectured upon human rights across the world, including Central Asia, East Asia, Europe, South East Asia and South America. Andrew is actively engaged in supporting the on-going reform process in Myanmar, travelling there regularly to undertake grass-roots capacity building human rights training for groups such as the National League for Democracy and Generation 88 and was one of the very first academics in the world to do so.

In 2013 he was also the very first academic to provide a course of summer school lectures in Kazakhstan. Andrew is an internationally recognised scholar, having published many books and articles, including; Human Rights: Confronting Myths & Misunderstandings (2009) and the Human Rights Atlas (2010). He is currently working on a book entitled Human Rights and Cultural Diversity for Edinburgh University Press.

  More

Less

Andrew Falle

Research Coordinator and Junior Fellow, Outer Space Institute, University of British Columbia
Andrew Falle is the Research Coordinator and a Junior Fellow at the Outer Space Institute (OSI), a interdisciplinary group of experts addressing emerging issues in space sustainability. He graduated from the University of British Columbia in 2020 with a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science.

  More

Less

Andrew Feinberg

Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University
I did the first experiments showing altered DNA methylation in cancer. I showed that epigenetic changes (chemical changes other than DNA sequence per se) cause cancer are not simply consequential to it through my studies of the disorder Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. Later I had the first NIH funded epigenome center. More recently I have developed the idea the genetic variants can control epigenetic stochasticity (plasticity) and phenotype (traits) under evolutionary selection in natural populations, or within an individual in the development of cancer.

  More

Less

Andrew George

Andrew George was appointed Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Education and International) on 1 October 2013. He joined Brunel from Imperial College London where he was Professor of Molecular Immunology and Director of the Graduate School and the School of Professional Development.

Andrew George did his first degree at the University of Cambridge, before going on to the Tenovus Laboratories in the University of Southampton to do his PhD with Professor Freda Stevenson, developing a vaccine for B cell lymphoma. He was awarded a Beit Memorial Fellowship and stayed in Southampton for his first postdoctoral period, before going to Dr David Segal’s laboratory in the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, USA, where he used recombinant techniques to generate novel antibody molecules. In 1992 he returned to the UK as a lecturer at the Royal Postgraduate Medical School, Hammersmith Hospital, which merged with Imperial College in 1997.

Andrew’s research has sought to understand and manipulate the immune system in order to treat disease, in particular to prevent the rejection of transplanted organs. He has also used mathematical models to understand how the immune system functions. In addition to his research, he has been involved in the ethical conduct and regulation of research. He is currently Chair of the UK’s National Research Ethics Advisors’ Panel and is on the Clinical Trials, Biologicals and Vaccines Expert Advisory Group for the Commission of Human Medicines/MHRA. He is a Governor of Richmond Adult Community College and the John Hampden School.

  More

Less

Andrew Gissimg

Director Enterprise Risk Management, Macquarie University

He is an emergency and risk management expert. Andrew has performed various senior executive roles in the emergency management and social services sectors, including as the Deputy Chief Officer of the Victoria State Emergency Service.

Andrew is an experienced crisis leader having held senior state-wide leadership roles during some of Australia’s most significant natural disasters such as the ‘Pasha Bulka’ Storm (2007), Black Saturday Bushfires (2009), and the Victorian Floods (2010/11). He has been author of state-wide disaster plans, policies and resilience strategies, for which he has received several awards.

Andrews’s significant professional experience is complemented by his academic achievements having completed a Masters of Science (Honours) Degree and a Bachelor of Economics Degree.

  More

Less

Andrew Grainger

Lecturer in Sport Development, Western Sydney University
Andy Grainger is a lecturer in Sport Development, Leisure, and Recreation at Western Sydney University. Prior to Western Sydney, he was a lecturer in Sport Sociology and Sport Development at Massey University in Aotearoa New Zealand. Andy’s research and teaching focuses primarily on the globalisation of sport and the impact of neoliberal ideology and practices on local physical cultural meanings and practices. His current research explores the intersections of sport policy, sport diplomacy, and women’s football in Aotearoa New Zealand. Andy is a co-editor, with Adam Beissel, Verity Postlethwaite, and Julie Brice, of the forthcoming collection ‘The 2023 FIFA Women's World Cup: Politics, Representation, and Management.'

  More

Less

Andrew Green

Professor and Metcalf Chair in Environmental Law, University of Toronto
Andrew Green is Professor and Metcalf Chair in Environmental Law at the University of Toronto Faculty of Law. He researches in the areas of climate change law, administrative law and judicial decision-making (including empirical analysis of how judges make decisions). His most recent is book is Picking up the Slack: Law, Institutions and Canadian Climate Policy (University of Toronto Press, 2022) which examines how Canadian law and legal institutions have fostered weak action on climate change but provide a basis for change.

  More

Less

Andrew Groves

Professor of Fashion Design, University of Westminster
Andrew Groves is Professor of Fashion Design at the University of Westminster, and the director of the Westminster Menswear Archive, which he founded in 2016. It houses over 2,000 examples of some of the most significant menswear garments from the last 250 years, including designer fashion, streetwear, everyday dress, sportswear, workwear, and uniforms.

Recognising the relative lack of menswear in other fashion and museum collections, the WMA was established to create a significant teaching collection centred on men’s garments that could be used for object-based research by both design students and the fashion industry. A further key aim was to facilitate and publicise the knowledge and understanding of menswear as a distinct design discipline through public engagement and exhibitions.

The collection holds over 2500 menswear garments from 1780 to the present day, with a primary focus on post-1940s British men's dress - clothing produced, designed, worn, or sold in Britain. It includes designer fashion, streetwear, everyday dress, sportswear, workwear, and uniforms. It receives over 800 visitors annually and is utilised for research purposes by students, academics, and designers in industry. It is inspired by Italian garment archives, specifically the Massimo Osti archive which was non-hierarchal, housing military, utilitarian, industrial, and fashion garments together.

In 2019, Groves co-curated Invisible Men: An Anthology from the Westminster Menswear Archive, the United Kingdom’s largest menswear exhibition to date. It investigated the invisibility of menswear as a result of its inherent design language, which focuses on iterations of archetypal garments intended for specific functional, technical, or military use. It demonstrated how designers have disrupted this by making small but significant modifications to produce results that both replicate and subvert their source material.

In 2021, Groves co-curated the exhibition Undercover – From Necessity to Luxury: The Evolution of Face Coverings During COVID-19. It explored how face coverings evolved over the period of a year, from being a functional PPE object in short supply to becoming an everyday object worn by millions. The WMA collected over a hundred examples of face coverings between April 2020 and April 2021, and the exhibition displayed 52 of these face coverings arranged chronologically to examine how the fashion industry rapidly adapted production, manufacturing, and online marketing to meet shifting consumer demands.

He is currently the principal investigator of the AHRC-funded network project, Locating the absent shadow: exploring connections and encounters in British menswear. This international network is designed to investigate the cultural and industrial connections between London, Liverpool, Manchester, and Milan, Italy, and how they have influenced the production, display, and consumption of British menswear.

  More

Less

Andrew Guthrie Ferguson

Professor of Law, American University
Professor Ferguson teaches and writes in the area of criminal procedure, evidence, and new technologies. He is a national expert on juries, predictive policing, big data surveillance, and the Fourth Amendment. His articles have appeared in the University of Pennsylvania Law Review, the California Law Review, the Cornell Law Review, the UCLA Law Review, the Minnesota Law Review, the Northwestern Law Review, the Vanderbilt Law Review, the University of Southern California Law Review, and the Notre Dame Law Review among others.

Professor Ferguson’s book The Rise of Big Data Policing: Surveillance, Race, and the Future of Law Enforcement (NYU Press) examines how surveillance technology and predictive analytics shapes modern policing. His first book Why Jury Duty Matters: A Citizen’s Guide to Constitutional Action (NYU Press) is the first book written for jurors on jury duty. (Book Review). For D.C. residents he also stars in the “Welcome To Jury Duty Video” in D.C. Superior Court seen by more than 30,000 citizens annually.

  More

Less

Andrew Hickey

Professor of Communications and Cultural Studies, University of Southern Queensland
Andrew Hickey is Professor of Communications and Cultural Studies at the University of Southern Queensland, and Chair of the University of Southern Queensland Human Research Ethics Committee. Andrew is an ethnographer and has undertaken large-scale projects exploring community, the public pedagogies of place in urban developments, and the enhancement of social harmony with partners including the Canadian Government, Australian Government Department of Education and Training, Education Queensland, state and local governments, and a number of community organizations. His books include The Pedagogies of Cultural Studies (Routledge 2016) and Cities of Signs: Learning the Logic of Urban Spaces (Peter Lang 2012). Andrew can be contacted via the School of Humanities and Communication, USQ. Email: andrew.hickey@usq,edu.au

  More

Less

Andrew Higham

Doctoral Researcher, Sheffield Hallam University
I am a Sport Psychology PhD student and graduate teaching associate at Sheffield Hallam University within the Sport and Physical Activity Research Centre (SPARC). My current research interests include well-being, welfare, and morality within professional sports contexts, with a particular focus on male football.

My present research aims to utilise novel qualitative methods to illuminate how professional football coaches experience and make sense of well-being. These methods include interpretative phenomenological analysis, video docuseries, and photo-elicitation. My PhD has a specific focus on how socio-contextual and temporal interactions shape a person's well-being.

I also have an MSc in Sport and Exercise Psychology, where I explored morality within professional football contexts.

Before starting my full-time PhD scholarship, I was a Higher Education Teaching Associate who taught across many sports science and coaching degree programmes.

  More

Less

Andrew Hughes

Lecturer, Research School of Management, Australian National University

Andrew Hughes is a lecturer in marketing at the Australian National University in Canberra. Prior to his academic career, Andrew worked in marketing management and strategy for some of Australia’s biggest organisations in the financial, industrial and services marketing sectors. His main areas of research include television advertising, branding, sports marketing, political and non-profit marketing, and marketing strategy. He has published numerous papers in political marketing, advertising and branding, and presented his work at conferences in Australia and overseas.

  More

Less

Andrew J. Hoffman

Andy Hoffman is the Holcim (US) Professor of Sustainable Enterprise at the University of Michigan, with joint appointments in the Ross School of Business and the School of Natural Resources & Environment. Andy also serves as the Education Director at the Graham Sustainability Institute.

Professor Hoffman has written extensively about corporate responses to climate change; how the interconnected networks of NGOs and corporations influence change processes; and the underlying cultural values that are engaged when these barriers are overcome. His research uses a sociological perspective to understand the cultural and institutional aspects of environmental issues for organizations. In particular, he focuses on the processes by which environmental issues both emerge and evolve as social, political and managerial issues.

He has published twelve books, which have been translated into five languages. His work has been covered in numerous media outlets, including the New York Times, Scientific American, Time, the Wall Street Journal and National Public Radio. He has served on research committees for the National Academies of Science, the Johnson Foundation, the Climate Group, the China Council for International Cooperation on Environment and Development and the Environmental Defense Fund. Prior to academics, Andy worked for the US Environmental Protection Agency (Region 1), Metcalf & Eddy Environmental Consultants, T&T Construction & Design and the Amoco Corporation.

Andy has worked with organizations in both the public and private sectors. This includes projects with: Accenture LLP, Dow Chemical Co., Environmental Defense Fund, Exxon-Mobil Corp., Holcim (US) Inc., International Finance Corp., Novartis, The Conference Board, The Nature Conservancy, The Southern Company, World Business Council on Sustainable Development, and Yellowstone National Park.

  More

Less

Andrew Jakubowicz

Professor of Sociology, University of Technology Sydney

Andrew Jakubowicz is Professor of Sociology at the University of Technology Sydney. He has an Honours degree in Government from Sydney University and a PhD from UNSW.

Since the early 1970s he has been involved in action research and race relations, and has been centrally involved in the development of materialist theories of cultural diversity. He has taught at universities in the USA, Europe and Asia, and was the foundation director of the Centre for Multicultural Studies at the University of Wollongong. He has published widely on ethnic diversity issues, disability studies and media studies. More recently he has been co-director of the Cosmopolitan Civil Societies Research Key Strength at UTS (2008-2015).

In 1994 he led the research team that produced the book, Racism Ethnicity and the Media (Allen and Unwin), and has has been involved in multimedia documentaries such as Making Multicultural Australia (1999-2004) and The Menorah of Fang Bang Lu (2001-2002). He was historical adviser to the exhibitions on the Jewish communities of Shanghai, at the Sydney Jewish Museum (2001-2002), the National Maritime Museum (2001-2003) and the national travelling exhibition, Crossroads: Shanghai and the Jews of China (2002-2003).

He was foundation chair of the Disability Studies and Research Institute. He chaired the Institute for Cultural Diversity, a national NGO (http://culturaldiversity.net.au) from 2009 to 2012.

He was historical advisor on the SBS series, "Immigration Nation" (2011), and is series advisor on "Once Upon a Time in...", a three season project for Northern Pictures and SBS, of which "Cabramatta" (2012) and "Punchbowl" (2014) have been released. He developed the concept for "The Great Australian Race Riot", a three episode series for SBS made by Essential Media broadcast in 2015.

Graduate research supervision areas include new media and social change, racism and ethnicity, public policy and marginalised minorities. He is current lead Chief Investigator on the ARC Linkage project "Cyber Racism and Community Resilience" with colleagues at Sydney, Western Sydney, Deakin and Monash universities, and in collaboration with the Australian Human Rights commission, VicHealth and the Federation of Ethnic Community Councils of Australia.

"Making Multicultural Australia in the 21st Century", an educational website developed jointly with the Office of the Board of Studies NSW, won the 2005 Best Secondary Educational website category of the annual Excellence in Educational Publishing Awards.

  More

Less

Andrew John

Research fellow, The University of Melbourne

  More

Less

Andrew Kenrick

Visiting Research Fellow, School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing, University of East Anglia
Andrew Kenrick (he/him) holds a PhD in Life Writing from the University of East Anglia, where he is a visiting research fellow. He specialises in writing ancient biography, and is currently writing about the lives of queer Romans. He lives in Norwich with his partner.

Key Research Interests

1st Century BC/AD Rome; ancient food and dining; perceptions/portrayals of race, ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation in the ancient world; biography.

Academic Background
BA Hons in Ancient History & Archaeology, University of Birmingham (2002)

MA in Biography and Creative Non-fiction, University of East Anglia (2017)

PhD in Life Writing, University of East Anglia (2023, thesis title - African Kings, Roman Rule: The Life of Juba II and Cleopatra Selene of Mauretania)

Career
Prior to returning to academia, Andrew worked as an editor for over 10 years. He holds a PhD in Life Writing, his thesis developed a new methodology for writing biographies of ancient characters, using Juba II and Cleopatra Selene of Mauretania as his test case. His area of research interest is object-based biography and life writing, as well as non-fiction publishing. He is the founder and editor of Hinterland, a quarterly print magazine of creative non-fiction.

Teaching Interests
Publishing; non-fiction; archives; archival research; biography; archaeology.

  More

Less

Andrew King

Climate Extremes Research Fellow, University of Melbourne

I'm a Research Fellow at the University of Melbourne interested in climate extremes and their attribution to human-induced climate change.

  More

Less

Andrew Kingsford-Smith

PhD Candidate in Educational Psychology, UNSW Sydney
Andrew Kingsford-Smith is a current Scientia PhD candidate and Casual Academic in the School of Education, UNSW. He has teaching experience at several universities and high schools, and is passionate about bringing evidence-based practices into schools. His research interests focus on student and teacher motivation, engagement, and wellbeing using quantitative analyses. Andrew’s research has been published in both academic journals and professional media outlets. Andrew has worked on several research projects at UNSW, including the “Optimal Music Performance”, “Rural & Regional Education” and “Graduate Ready Schools” projects.

  More

Less

Andrew Lacey

Senior Research Associate on the Davy Notebooks Project, Lancaster University
I am Senior Research Associate on the Davy Notebooks Project (Arts and Humanities Research Council funded).

I joined the Department in 2014 as Senior Research Associate (Modern Humanities Research Association funded) on the Davy Letters Project (http://www.davy-letters.org.uk). Between 2015-18, I continued to work on the Davy Letters Project in posts funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council, the British Academy, and the Society for the History of Alchemy and Chemistry.

I studied at Durham University (2004-07) and Newcastle University (2007-08; 2009-12). After completing my PhD (Arts and Humanities Research Council funded) on the philosophy of death in the poetry of William Wordsworth and Percy Bysshe Shelley, I worked as Research Assistant on two projects in the School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics at Newcastle University: The Letters of William Godwin (Oxford University Press), gen. ed. Pamela Clemit, volume III, ed. by M. O. Grenby (forthcoming), and The Poems of Shelley (Longman Annotated English Poets), volume IV, ed. by Michael Rossington, Jack Donovan, and Kelvin Everest (London: Routledge, 2013).

I am Co-Editor of Nineteenth-Century Contexts.

I currently serve as the Postdoctoral Representative on the Departmental Research Committee. I also serve on the Project Board of Prosper (project led by the University of Liverpool; project partners the University of Manchester and Lancaster University; funded by the UKRI Research England Development Fund).

My current research interests include Romantic-period literature, 1798-1822 (especially poetry, and especially the writings of Shelley and Wordsworth); philosophy (especially of death) in Romantic-period literature; the writings of Humphry Davy (especially his letters), John Davy, and the relationships between literature and science in the early nineteenth century; and the theory and practice of scholarly editing. I have published articles on Crabbe, Davy, Keats, Shelley, and Wordsworth. I am currently completing my first monograph, on Shelley and death.

  More

Less

Andrew Lenton

Director Permanent Carbon Locking Future Science Platform (CarbonLock), CSIRO Environment, CSIRO
Andrew Lenton is the Director of CSIRO's Permanent Carbon Locking Future Science Platform (CarbonLock). CarbonLock focuses on novel Carbon Dioxide Removal that is scalable, fast-acting, permanent and responsible.

His research interests focus on Carbon Dioxide Removal and its role in reaching net zero and transitioning to a net-negative world. Dr Lenton is engaged in national and international Carbon Dioxide Removal research efforts, co-leading the recent Climate Change Authority Reports on Australia’s Carbon Sequestration Potential. Amongst other roles, Andrew continues to lead the Carbon Dioxide Removal Model Intercomparison Project (CDRMIP), is a principal investigator in several national and international projects, and serves on several national and international advisory groups.

He brings over 20 years of experience modelling the global carbon cycle and climate, focusing on understanding past, present and future changes in the earth's system and exploring solutions beyond mitigation to address climate change. He has been involved in negative emissions and geoengineering research for over a decade. Andrew has held a number of positions, from Research Director to leading CSIRO's Earth System Science Portfolio. He has over 100 peer-reviewed publications and reports, including the 5th and 6th IPCC Assessment Reports.

  More

Less

  11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20   
  • Market Data
Close

Welcome to EconoTimes

Sign up for daily updates for the most important
stories unfolding in the global economy.