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Katharine Seton

Immunology Research Scientist, ME/CFS Research, Quadram Institute
I am a postdoctoral research scientist with a background in immunology and myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) research.

I obtained a Bachelor of Science (BSc) degree from Newcastle University in 2016. During my undergraduate degree I was awarded a vacation scholarship from the Wellcome Trust which was used to study the heritability of ME/CFS over 8 weeks. After obtaining my BSc I moved to Norwich to undertake a PhD based at the Quadram Institute, which was funded by the UK charity Invest in ME Research. My PhD investigated the immune response to gut microbes in ME/CFS patients.

I am now at the Quadram Institute as an immunology research scientist in the Gut Microbes and Health programme where my principle role is to determine whether ME/CFS patients have premature ageing of the immune system because of chronic exposure to gut microbes. I will be working on the phase IIb clinical trial of faecal microbiota transplantation in ME/CFS patients (RESTORE-ME study).

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Katharine Wallis

Professor Katharine Wallis is Mayne Professor and Head, Mayne Academy of General Practice and Head, General Practice Clinical Unit at the University of Queensland Medical School. She is a Fellow of both the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine and the Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners currently practising part-time as a GP on the Gold Coast.

Katharine’s research focuses on patient safety in primary care, in particular supporting safer prescribing in general practice. Current projects include RELEASE: REdressing Long-tErm Antidepressant uSE in general practice funded by a MRFF 2020 Clinician Researchers: Applied Research in Health grant; RELEASE: Think-Aloud study with patients to optimise RELEASE resources, funded by the Mayne Bequest; a pilot study in general practice of the 3-Domains screening toolkit for older driver medical assessment in general practice, funded by the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners Foundation / Motor Accident Insurance Commission; and a validation study of the 3-Domains toolkit in older Australian drivers in the Princess Alexandra Hospital Occupational Therapy Driving Assessment & Rehabilitation Service also funded by the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners Foundation / Motor Accident Insurance Commission; and Mind the gaps: preparedness of new general practitioner fellows for independent practice’ project funded by the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners Education Research grant. She is Founding Director of the practice-based research network UQGP Research. Other research interests include medical ethics and medical professional regulation.

Katharine’s alma mater is the University of Otago in New Zealand. She joined UQ in late 2019 from the University of Auckland. Katharine’s previous roles include Associate Editor of the Rural and Remote Health Journal; Associate Editor Journal Primary Health Care; member Health Practitioners Disciplinary Tribunal, Medical Council of New Zealand (2004-2019); member Medicines Adverse Reactions Committee, Medsafe, Ministry of Health (2010-2017); member Perinatal & Maternal Mortality Review Committee, Maternal Mortality Working Group, Health Quality & Safety Commission (2014-2017); and member Ethics Committee, New Zealand Medical Association (2013-2018). Current roles include Deputy Chair of the Australasian Association for Academic Primary Care, Academic Policy and Advocacy committee; and member Oxford International Primary Care Research Leadership Programme, University of Oxford.

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Katherine Astbury

Associate Professor and Reader of French, University of Warwick
In October 2013 I began an AHRC-funded project on French Theatre of the Napoleonic Era. This project involves a team of doctoral and postdoctoral researchers working on linking close textual readings to larger cultural, social and political issues. I am currently putting the finishing touches to a critical edition of Pixerécourt's La Forteresse du Danube (1805) for the playwright's complete works being published by Garnier.

In 2012 I published a monograph on 'non-political' fiction of the 1790s as a response to the trauma of the Revolution (Narrative Responses to the trauma of the French Revolution (Oxford, Legenda, 2012)). The research has shown how the apparent continuity of Ancien Régime tropes, settings and characters is in fact an indication of writers' traumatised response to the Revolution.

My first book on The Moral Tale in France and Germany 1750-1789, examining the development of short fiction in the two countries in the years leading up to the French Revolution, was published by the Voltaire Foundation as SVEC 2002:7. Much of my work is centred on questions of literary history and the thorny problem of literary influence.

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Katherine Bates

Lecturer in Initial Teacher Education: English Specialisation, University of Technology Sydney
MEd (Distinction)., BE.d.

Links to publications: https://profiles.uts.edu.au/Katherine.Bates/publications

Link to doctoral study: How do visual prompts shape students’ written responses?

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Katherine Brickell

Professor of Urban Studies, King's College London
Katherine Brickell is Professor of Urban Studies in the Department of Geography at King's College London. She is a feminist geographer whose research focuses on experiences of precarious home and working lives.

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Katherine Brown

Professor of Paediatric Cardiac Intensive Care, UCL
Professor Kate Brown has been a consultant in Paediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Unit at Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust (GOSH) for more than 20 years. Kate has a Masters in public health and is the Centre Lead for Outcomes of Children’s Cardiovascular Disease and Critical Illness at the Children’s Institute of Cardiovascular Science, University College London (UCL). Kate’s research interests lie in children's critical illness and children's heart disease, including evaluation of treatments, long-term impacts, and parent and child experiences of critical illness.

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Katherine Dafforn

Senior Research Associate in Marine Ecology, UNSW Australia

I am a marine ecologist and science communicator working at the University of New South Wales. I work with the Applied Marine Ecology and Ecotoxicology Lab in the School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences and am also a member of the Evolution and Ecology Research Centre. You will find me working in my office or lab at UNSW or from the labs and aquarium at the Sydney Institute of Marine Sciences, where I am involved in the Sydney Harbour Research Program.

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Katherine Dickin

Associate Professor of Public & Ecosystem Health, Cornell University
Katherine Dickin conducts formative and implementation research on the effectiveness of community-based programs to improve nutritional status and reduce health inequities in the U.S. and globally. This includes qualitative and quantitative research on maternal and child nutrition, responsive parenting and social support, food security, obesity prevention, capacity building for multisectoral nutrition and sustainable food systems. A central focus is the interface between public health practitioners and communities, to understand contextual influences on delivery and use of interventions for low-income families. In her teaching, she focuses on experiential learning in global and public health, and mentoring on research methods. Engaging with communities and students, she aims to design programs reflecting local knowledge, norms, and values.

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Katherine Duffy

Senior Lecturer in Marketing, University of Glasgow
Dr Kat Duffy is a Senior Lecturer in Marketing at the Adam Smith Business School. She holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Strathclyde, along with an MSc in Marketing (Distinction) from the University of Strathclyde and an MA (Hons.) English Literature from the University of Glasgow. Previously, she was a Lecturer in Marketing at the University of Essex (2013-2015) and her academic interests are complimented by her practical marketing experience (including roles at 5pm.co.uk and The Marketing Society Scotland).

Current research interests in consumer culture include clothing sustainability and circularity, alongside the digitalisation of consumption. Her research is published in a range of journals including Journal of Business Research, Consumption Markets and Culture, Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Journal of Marketing Management and Gender Work and Organisation.

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Katherine Guinness

Lecturer in Art History, The University of Queensland
Katherine Guinness is a theorist and historian of contemporary art and visual culture. She is the author of Schizogenesis: The Art of Rosemarie Trockel (Minnesota, 2019), the co-author of The Influencer Factory: A Marxist Theory of Corporate Personhood on YouTube (Stanford, 2024). Katherine has taught in a wide range of departments and programs across the globe, including the University of Sydney (in their Digital Cultures program), the University of New South Wales (where she taught Architectural History within their school of the Built Environment), North Carolina State University (Women’s and Gender Studies programs), and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (Art History). Her research spans a variety of topics within visual culture, all of which she approaches with a Marxist-feminist lens.

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Katherine Harry

PhD Student in Chemistry, Colorado State University
Katherine's research interests include organic synthesis, polymer chemistry and sustainable chemistry.

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Katherine Kenny

ARC DECRA Senior Research Fellow, University of Sydney
Dr Katherine Kenny is Deputy Director of the Sydney Centre for Healthy Societies, and an ARC DECRA Senior Research Fellow in the School of Social and Political Sciences at The University of Sydney. She gained her PhD in Sociology and Science Studies from the University of California, San Diego in 2015. Prior to joining The University of Sydney, she held positions as Postdoctoral Research Fellow, then Research Fellow at the Practical Justice Initiative and Centre for Social Research in Health at UNSW Sydney. Her research draws on social theory and qualitative methodologies to better understand how health and disease, (or illness and wellness) are understood, ‘treated’, experienced and made meaningful in clinical contexts and in everyday life.

PhD UC San Diego
MA UC San Diego
BSc(Hons) UNSW
BA UNSW

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Katherine Kirkwood

PhD Candidate, Queensland University of Technology

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Katherine Levine Einstein

Katherine Levine Einstein joined the department in 2012 after receiving her Ph.D. in Government and Social Policy at Harvard University. Her research and teaching interests broadly include American public policy, racial and ethnic politics, political geography, and urban politics and policy. Her first book Do Facts Matter? Information and Misinformation in Democratic Politics (with Jennifer Hochschild) explores the harmful effects of misinformation on democratic politics. It will be published in 2015 (University of Oklahoma Press). Her current book project (supported by a Russell Sage Foundation grant) Divided Regions: Racial Inequality, Political Segregation, and the Splintering of Metropolitan America examines how America’s stark racial segregation creates politically divided metropolitan jurisdictions and consequent sharp metropolitan cleavages across a number of important policies. In addition, her work has been published or is forthcoming in Political Behavior, the British Journal of Political Science, and several edited volumes.

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Katherine Meizel

Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology, Bowling Green State University
Katherine Meizel is Professor of Ethnomusicology at Bowling Green State University. Her research has focused on voice and identity, music and disability studies, and popular music and media, Her book Idolized: Music, Media, and Identity in American Idol (IU Press) was published in 2011, and Multivocality: Singing on the Borders of Identity was published in 2020. Her writing has also appeared in public venues such as Slate, NPR.org, and The New Republic, as well as The Conversation.

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Katherine Meizel

Katherine Meizel earned her Ph.D. in ethnomusicology at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and also holds D.M.A., M.M., and bachelor’s degrees in vocal performance. Her research has focused on voices and vocalities, and topics including popular music and media, religion, American identities, and disability studies. She also has an interest in performing American old time music. Her book Idolized: Music, Media, and Identity in American Idol was published by Indiana University Press in early 2011; she also wrote about Idol for the magazine Slate from 2007 to 2011. Other publications have appeared in Popular Music and Society, The Grove Dictionary of American Music, MUSICultures, The Voice and Speech Review, the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, eHumanista, and several edited collections. She is currently co-editor of the upcoming Oxford Handbook of Voice Studies. At BGSU, Dr. Meizel teaches courses in music and identity, world musics, and seminars in ethnomusicology.

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Katherine Michelmore

Associate Professor of Public Policy, University of Michigan
Katherine Michelmore is an associate professor of public policy at the University of Michigan's Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy. Michelmore is a leading scholar and educator on the social safety net, education policy, labor economics, and economic demography. A research associate at NBER, she is a recognized expert on the efficacy of the Earned Income Tax Credit and its impact on children. Previously, she was assistant professor of public administration and international affairs at Syracuse University’s Maxwell School. Katherine completed her PhD in policy analysis and management at Cornell University. She holds a BA in economics and psychology from Wesleyan University. Prior to obtaining her PhD, Katherine was a research assistant at the Urban Institute.

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Katherine Reinhart

Assistant Professor of Art History, Binghamton University, State University of New York
Katherine Reinhart specializes in the history of art and visual culture of the early modern period. Her research examines intersections between art and science, with a particular focus on the creation, use, and circulation of images in the formation of knowledge.

She is currently completing her first book, Images for the King: Art, Science, and Power in Louis XIV’s France, which examines the epistemic and political functions of images in the Académie royale des sciences—one of the first and most eminent scientific societies in the seventeenth century. It interrogates how various images and objects were created, selected, and deployed in the service of knowledge production and as a means of broadcasting monarchical power. In doing so, this book accounts for the pictorial practices of the natural philosophers assembled in Paris by Louis XIV and the artists with whom they collaborated and situates them in the larger context of the Sun King’s absolutist government and image-making program. Based on previously unstudied archival materials, Images for the King integrates the histories of art and science to explore graphic skill, visual and scientific practice, patronage structures, knowledge production, and the politics of images. Ultimately, it reveals how visual materials—from anatomical drawings to allegorical reliefs on coins—were indispensable to the Academy’s projects, providing tangible evidence of just how central scientific ambitions were to the evolving French state.

Reinhart is currently working on three larger research projects: the first explores the materiality and material culture of early modern science and will culminate in an article and guest-edited special issue of the journal Centaurus. The second, a collaboration with Matthijs Jonker, takes an interdisciplinary and comparative approach to the visual culture of early modern scientific societies through an international symposium and edited volume. Finally, the third project investigates practices of image copying and circulation as they created and transmitted scientific and artistic ideas across early modern Europe and its colonial networks.

Professor Reinhart’s research has been supported by the Folger Shakespeare Library, the Camargo Foundation, the Consortium for the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine in Philadelphia, the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, and she is an ongoing member of the “Visualizing Science in Media Revolutions” Research Group at the Bibliotheca Hertziana - Max Planck Institute for Art History in Rome.

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Katherine Riley

Lecturer, School of Nursing, University of Wollongong
Katherine is a nurse academic and in the final stages of her PhD candidature at the University of Wollongong. Her research focuses on the resuscitation experiences and practices of rural nurses, utilising an ethnographic methodology. Katherine is dedicated to raising awareness of the challenges faced by the rural health workforce and shed light on critical aspects of rural health care. Katherine's research will continue to support the delivery of optimal care for deteriorating patients in low-resource and understaffed rural settings through co-design strategies.

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Katherine Tamminen

Associate Professor, Sport Psychology, University of Toronto
I am an Associate Professor and the Associate Dean, Graduate Education in the Faculty of Kinesiology & Physical Education at the University of Toronto. My research program in sport psychology draws on qualitative and quantitative methodological approaches and focuses on athlete mental health; stress, coping, and emotion regulation; and youth athletes’ experiences in sport and the influence of parents and coaches in youth sport. I am currently an Editor-in-Chief of the journal Psychology of Sport and Exercise, I am the Past President of the Canadian Society for Psychomotor Learning and Sport Psychology (SCAPPS), and a Member at Large with the International Society of Qualitative Research in Sport and Exercise. In addition to my research and teaching, I am also a Registered Psychotherapist and provides clinical psychotherapy services for athletes, coaches, and individuals working in various high-performance environments including sport, music, and performing arts.

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Katherine Tuft

Visiting Research Fellow, University of Adelaide
Dr Katherine Tuft is Chief Executive of Arid Recovery, an independent not-for-profit running pioneering conservation science to help threatened species thrive across the Australian outback. She is a Visiting Research Fellow at the University of Adelaide and has a background in conservation research and management.

She completed a PhD in ecology of rock-wallabies in NSW and spent six years living in the remote Kimberley working to understand and reverse the failing fortunes of mammals in northern Australia. Now at Arid Recovery,
she manages Australia’s largest predator-proof fenced reserve and a centre for conservation research on arid ecosystem restoration and threatened species recovery.

Kath is a founding member of Team Kowari, a deputy member of the Pastoral Board in South Australia, and a member of the Australian Wildlife Conservancy's Scientific Advisory Panel.

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Katherine Warwick

PhD Candidate, Western Sydney University

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Katherine Weikert

Deputy Head of the School of History and Archaeology, University of Winchester
Dr Katherine Weikert is Senior Lecturer in Early Medieval European History and Deputy Head of the School of History and Archaeology. Her first monograph, Authority, Space and Gender in the Norman Conquest Era, c. 900-c. 1200, was short-listed for the Alice Davis Hitchcock Medallion from the Society of Architectural Historians of Great Britain. Her main areas of research examine the connections between gender, space and authority in England and Normandy ca 900-1200, and the political uses of the medieval past.

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Katherine Weisensee

Professor of Anthropology, Clemson University
My current research focuses on estimating the time of death or postmortem interval in medicolegal death investigations. Research funded by the National Institute of Justice utilizes an application, geoFOR to provide predictions of the postmortem interval. I also continue to examine changes that have occurred in the craniofacial morphology of modern populations during the past 200 years. The past two centuries have been a unique experiment on the effects of extreme environmental change on human populations. I am exploring both the proximate and ultimate causes underlying the effects of changes in mortality patterns, migration rates, and socio-economic parameters in a modern population and their outcomes on the phenotype. I have also been working as a forensic anthropology consultant for various counties in the Upstate of South Carolina. When skeletal remains are discovered, I assist law enforcement officers with the identification of the remains.

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Katherine V. Gough

Professor of Human Geography, Loughborough University
Academic career

Professor of Human Geography, Loughborough University, 2012 onwards
Reader in Urban Geography, Loughborough University, 2010-2012
Assistant Professor and Associate Professor, Department of Geography, University of Copenhagen, 1997-2010
Visiting Research Fellow, LLILAS, University of Texas at Austin, 2020
Visiting Scholar, CLAS, University of Cambridge and bye-fellow Newnham College, 2019
Visiting Professor, Department of Geography, Umeå University, Sweden, 2018
Visiting Professor, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark, 2015
Visiting Research Fellow, Department of Geography, University of Cambridge and Sidney Sussex College, 2007-2008
Editorial responsibilities

Editor of International Development Planning Review, 2011-2018 (Editorial Board Member 2008-2011)
Associate Editor of Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, 2010-2013 (Editorial Board Member 2008-2010)
Member of Editorial Board of EchoGeo, 2021 onwards
Editorial Board Member of Geoforum, 2019 onwards
Editorial Board Member of Ghana Journal of Geography, 2014 onwards
International Advisory Board Member of Singapore Journal of Tropical Geography, 2011-2020

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Kathleen Abadie

Ph.D. Candidate in Bioengineering, University of Washington
Kathleen is studying the molecular regulators of memory cell differentiation.

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Kathleen Bachynski

Assistant Professor, Public Health, Muhlenberg College
Kathleen Bachynski is an assistant professor of public health at Muhlenberg College and author of “No Game for Boys to Play: The History of Youth Football and the Origins of a Public Health Crisis” (University of North Carolina Press, 2019). She is a volunteer member of the professional advisory board of Pink Concussions, a nonprofit organization that advocates for more research on concussions among girls and women.

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Kathleen Belew

Associate Professor of History, Northwestern University
Kathleen Belew is a historian, author, and teacher. She specializes in the history of the present. She spent ten years researching and writing her first book, Bring the War Home: The White Power Movement and Paramilitary America (Harvard, 2018, paperback 2019). In it, she explores how white power activists created a social movement through a common story about betrayal by the government, war, and its weapons, uniforms, and technologies. By uniting Ku Klux Klan, neo-Nazi, skinhead, and other groups, the movement mobilized and carried out escalating acts of violence that reached a crescendo in the 1995 bombing of Oklahoma City. This movement was never adequately confronted, and remains a threat to American democracy. Her next book, Home at the End of the World, illuminates our era of apocalypse through a history focused on her native Colorado where, in the 1990s, high-profile kidnappings and murders, right-wing religious ideology, and a mass shooting exposed rents in America’s social fabric, and dramatically changed our relationship with place, violence, and politics (Random House).

Belew has spoken about Bring the War Home in a wide variety of places, including The Rachel Maddow Show, The Last Word With Lawrence O’Donnell, AC 360 with Anderson Cooper, Frontline, Fresh Air, and All Things Considered. Her work has featured prominently in documentaries such as Homegrown Hate: The War Among Us (ABC) and Documenting Hate: New American Nazis (Frontline). Belew is an Associate Professor of History at Northwestern University. She earned tenure at the University of Chicago in 2021, where she spent seven years. Her research has received the support of the Chauncey and Marion Deering McCormick Foundation, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and the Jacob K. Javits Foundation. Belew earned her BA in the Comparative History of Ideas from the University of Washington, where she was named Dean’s Medalist in the Humanities. She earned a doctorate in American Studies from Yale University.

Belew has held postdoctoral fellowships from the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University (2019-20), Northwestern University, and Rutgers University. Her award-winning teaching centers on the broad themes of history of the present, conservatism, race, gender, violence, identity, and the meaning of war. Belew is co-editor of and contributor to A Field Guide to White Supremacy, and has contributed essays to Myth America and The Presidency of Donald J. Trump: A First Historical Assessment.

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Kathleen Cho

Principal Investigator in Neuroscience, Inserm
Kathleen received her B.S. with Honors in Neuroscience and a B.A. in History at Brown University. At MIT, she studied learning and memory mechanisms in the visual cortex in Mark Bear's laboratory and earned a Ph.D. in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences. She joined Vikaas Sohal's laboratory at UCSF as a postdoctoral fellow, to study the mechanisms of functional circuits in the context of mental illness. Currently, she is a principal investigator at the Paris Brain Institute (ICM) by way of Inserm, investigating the role of perisomatic inhibition on prefrontal cortex neurons in gamma oscillations and cognitive flexibility.

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Kathleen McGuire

Lecturer, Australian Catholic University
Dr Kathleen McGuire is an Australian-American music educator, composer and conductor with four decades’ experience. Committed to social justice advocacy, which is reflected by research and artistic contributions. Career highlights: a decade as Artistic Director of the San Francisco Gay Men’s Chorus; conducting at Carnegie Hall, The Kennedy Center; Sydney Opera House; collaborating on major, recognised commissions to co-create the cantata Street Requiem - performed in multiple countries to focus on the plight of homelessness and violence against innocents; also No Excuses!, a choral suite for women inspired by true stories from victims of domestic violence. Qualifications: DMA (Colorado), MMus (Surrey), GradDipEd (Monash), GradDipA, BMus (Melbourne).

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Kathleen Openshaw

Lecturer in School of Social Sciences, Western Sydney University
Dr Kathleen Openshaw is a lecturer in the School of Social Sciences at Western Sydney University. She has a PhD from Western Sydney University (Australia), and a Master’s degree in Anthropology and Development Studies (Maynooth University, Ireland). Kathleen’s main research interests are the intersection between migration and religiosity – in particular, the experiences of African diaspora communities and their transnational connections to their homelands through the lens of their religiosity. Her PhD research was an ethnography of the Brazilian megachurch The Universal Church of the Kingdom of God (UCKG) in Australia. Kathleen is currently a member of the research team for an Australian Research Council Discovery Project, “The African Diaspora and Pentecostalism in Australia”. She is co-editor (with C. Rocha and M. Hutchinson) of Australian Pentecostal and Charismatic Movements: Arguments from the Margins. Leiden: Brill (2020).

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Kathleen Sexsmith

Assistant Professor of Rural Sociology, Penn State
My research program looks broadly at gender and rural development, with both domestic and international areas of focus. In the U.S., I study how gender, legal status, and geographical isolation shape integration among immigrants working in agricultural industries. In particular, I look at social networks and transnational ways of life in non-traditional rural immigrant destinations. My international research examines the gender dynamics of sustainable agriculture initiatives, including voluntary certifications, responsible investment, and climate-smart agricultural programming in the Global South.

My work has a community outreach and advocacy focus, although I do not have a formal extension appointment. Here at Penn State, I continue to build partnerships with outreach and advocacy organizations that support vulnerable populations in agriculture.

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Kathleen A. Hill

Associate Professor Biology, Western University
Kathleen Hill is an Associate Professor in Biology at Western University, London ON Canada. She is a geneticist with research expertise in mutation detection, mutagenesis, mutation signatures and genomic signatures. Her PhD thesis research studied pervasive patterns in DNA sequence composition using Chaos Game Representation. Her postdoctoral training [Biochemistry, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN] investigated the origins of mutations in haemophilia. Her research in Molecular Medicine at City of Hope [Duarte, CA] characterized mutations arising with development, ageing and carcinogenesis. At Western University, her team has expertise in mutation research, environmental mutagenesis, population genetics and genome evolution. Her research uses molecular assays, bioinformatics tools and in silico supervised and unsupervised machine learning approaches to study mutations and genome composition. Her trainees study patterns and associations in mutation data in chromosomal and genome landscapes to gain insight into mutagenesis and selection in models of genetic disorders and carcinogenesis. Kathleen designs and teaches university courses in science communication, genetics, political biology, and bioethics for undergraduate and graduate students.

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Kathleen Knight Abowitz

Professor of Educational Leadership, Miami University
I am a professor in the Department of Educational Leadership, focusing on educational philosophy and foundations since 1995 at Miami University in Oxford, OH. I publish research in political and moral philosophy of education; have worked in leadership roles in The John Dewey Society, American Educational Studies Association, the North American Philosophy of Education Society and the Ohio Valley Philosophy of Education Society. I teach courses in democracy and education, ethics and education, and leadership ethics. I served as an elected school board in Talawanda City Schools from 2019-2023.

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Kathrin Wagner

Associate Professor in Art History, Liverpool Hope University
I studied Art History and Italian in Berlin (Germany) and Siena (Italy) and gained my BA, MA and PhD from the Free University Berlin. After working in museums in Berlin and New York, I joined Liverpool Hope University from Cardiff University in 2011.

My role is divided into two major strands. I currently act as Associate Dean (Student Experience) in the Faculty of Creative Arts and Humanities. I also work as Associate Professor in the Art History team, where I teach and supervise Art History, Fine Art and Graphic Design students.

My research focuses on the late medieval and premodern period. It includes northern European ecclesiastical art work and its role and function within a variety of communities but also the investigation of movement and migration of visual artists. Another strand of my research is the exploration of gender and sexuality in imagery of swimming and bathing in premodern art, which is discussed in a monograph I am currently preparing (publisher Routledge).

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