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Kate Patterson

Kate Patterson uses visual language to transform complex scientific concepts for a general audience. Kate is a trans-disciplinary researcher working at the interface of art and science, using storytelling to bring together the historically segregated fields of technology, art and science.

Communication is a critical component of medical research and through the use of traditional animation, computer generated imagery and 3D animation, Kate transforms raw scientific data using the tools of visual arts and cinematography into a form that can be used for education, communication and awareness purposes. She uses both hand drawn, frame by frame animation as well as state-of-the art animation software (Maya and After Effects) to create engaging science stories.

Kate graduated from the University of Sydney faculty of Veterinary Science in 2003. She worked full time as a small animal veterinarian until 2005 and then continued to work part time in clinical practice while completing her PhD in cancer research, signal transduction at the Garvan Institute which was awarded in 2009.

More recently, Kate worked as a biomedical animator as part of the VIZBIplus team and the Inspiring Australia Unlocking Australia's potential initiative. She now works with Professor Susan Clark, head of the Genomics and Epigenetics division at the Garvan Institute, is a Fellow of the 3D Aesthetics and Viualisation laboratory and lecturer at UNSW Art and Design.

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Kate Pattison

PhD Candidate, RMIT University
Kate is a third year PhD Candidate at RMIT, researching pop music fans and creativity. In particular, she's interested in whether the skills developed within music fandom can be transferred into professional environments. Through her research, she's speaking with fans of Harry Styles, Delta Goodrem, Taylor Swift and BTS. Kate also works as a social media consultant in the entertainment industry.

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Kate Scott

Researcher in Climate Mitigation, University of Leeds

I have recently completed a PhD on the integration of embodied emissions into UK climate policy. My research includes: climate mitigation, consumption-based emissions accounting, resource efficiency, low carbon transitions and scenario analysis.

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Kate Sherren

Professor, School for Resource and Environmental Studies, Dalhousie University
Kate Sherren is an applied social scientist who spends most of her time thinking about landscape change. She studies how we see, use, experience, and value modified landscapes like farms, coasts, and hydroelectric dams—among other things—and how in the face of climate change we can work collectively towards more sustainable and just future for the places we live in and care about.

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Kate Sprogis

Adjunct Research Fellow, UWA Oceans Institute, The University of Western Australia
Australian marine mammal biologist. PhD on the behavioural ecology of bottlenose dolphins (habitat use, abundance and distribution, home range, climate change), through Murdoch University, Australia. Post-doctorate on anthropogenic noise impacts on humpback whales, as a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellow in the Marine Bioacoustics Lab, Aarhus University, Denmark.

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Kate Umbers

Senior Lecturer in Zoology, Western Sydney University
Senior Lecturer in Zoology at Western Sydney University, Managing Director of Invertebrates Australia, Biodiversity Council councilor, co-chair of the IUCN Grasshopper Specialist Group. Former member of the NSW Threatened Species Scientific Committee, former president of the Australasian Society for the Study of Animal Behaviour.
ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9375-4527

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Kate Vincent

Lecturer in Social Work, Social Work Program Convenor, University of Tasmania
I am a White, Euro-Australian, cisgender female, living and working in lutruwita / Tasmania. I am a Lecturer in Social Work and the Social Work Program Convenor at the University of Tasmania.

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Kate Vitasek

Professor of supply chain management, University of Tennessee
Kate Vitasek is an international authority on the art, science and practice of highly collaborative business relationships. Her Vested® business model for highly collaborative relationships has been featured on CNN International, Bloomberg, NPR and Fox Business News. Vitasek is the author of seven books, including Vested: How P&G, McDonald’s and Microsoft Are Redefining Winning in Business Relationships; Getting to We: Negotiating Agreements for Highly Collaborative Relationships; and Contracting in the New Economy. Her work has been featured in more than 300 articles including in the Harvard Business Review, Chief Executive Magazine, Forbes and Journal of Commerce.

Vitasek is in the Sourcing Industry Group’s Hall of Fame and is a World Commerce and Contracting Fellow. She has been named a Rainmaker by DC Velocity Magazine, Woman on the Move in Trade and Transportation by the Journal of Commerce, and a Power Influencer by World Financial Magazine.

She is the lead faculty for UT’s Certified Deal Architect Program.

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Kate Wilson

Senior Lecturer, School of Engineering and IT, UNSW

Kate is a UNSW Scientia Education Fellow and senior lecturer in the School of Engineering and Information Technology and Learning and Teaching Group at UNSW Canberra (at the Australian Defence Force Academy). Kate teaches engineering mechanics and two teaching training programs for early career academics.

She has a PhD in physics from Monash University, and has done research in computational physics and condensed matter physics. Her current research interests include student learning, the transition from school to university and gender differences in performance on assessment.

Kate is coauthor of an undergraduate physics textbook and four high school physics textbooks, and has also contributed to texts on chemistry and biology.

She is a past director of the Australian Science Olympiads Physics Program and honorary member of the Sydney University Physics Education Research group.

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Kate Wingrove

PhD Candidate at the Sustainable Buildings Research Centre, University of Wollongong
Kate Wingrove is a current PhD candidate at the Sustainable Building Research Centre, at the University of Wollongong.

Kate's research focus is to investigate the design processes which lead to enhanced sustainable outcomes for new build housing, in order to identify practicable pathways for increased design of sustainable housing in Australia. Kate is interested in how to integrate critical design processes into the volume build business model to improve sustainability outcomes for new build homes in Australia.

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Kate Woodward

Lecturer in Film Studies, Aberystwyth University
My current and ongoing areas of research focus on Welsh film (both Welsh and English language), Welsh film history, contemporary Welsh film, cultural policy and cultural institutions including S4C and the Arts Council of Wales. Current and recent projects include an exploration of location, space and place in Hinterland / Y Gwyll, a study of Welsh language music documentaries, landscape and the concept of the border in the film On the Black Hill (1987), and cultural policy since devolution.

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Kate E. Williams

Adjunct Associate Professor, Queensland University of Technology
Kate Williams is an Adjunct Associate Professor in the School of Early Childhood & Inclusive Education at QUT and is currently the Executive Manager of Operations for Play Matters Australia. Kate has a PhD in early childhood development, and is also a Registered Music Therapist. She has published more than 60 papers on children’s social emotional development, early learning, early childhood education and care, and parenting. Kate has undertaken a range of contracted research reports and evaluations for government, with a focus on longitudinal quantitative data.

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Kate McNicholas Smith

Lecturer in Television Theory, University of Westminster
Kate has a background in sociology, media and cultural studies and gender and sexuality studies. Her research is concerned with queer, feminist engagements with popular culture and celebrity, with a particular focus on television. Recent research explores LGBTQ+ lives and representations; queer fan cultures; social media; gender, sexuality and celebrity; television and society/social change.

Kate holds a BA in Drama and Theatre Studies (2006, Royal Holloway, University of London), an MA in Gender and Women's Studies and English (2008, Lancaster University), and an MA in Sociological Research (2010, Lancaster University). Her PhD research (2014, Lancaster University) combined television studies, fan studies, feminist and queer theory.

Between 2011 and 2017, Kate taught at Lancaster University across Gender Studies, Media Studies and Sociology. Joining the University of Westminster in 2018, Kate teaches television and media theory on BA Television Production, BA Film and MA Film, Television and Moving Image, specialising in teaching on media and representation; contemporary television culture; and audiences.

In 2020, Kate's book Lesbians On Television: New Queer Visibility and The Lesbian Normal was published by Intellect. The twenty-first century has seen LGBTQ+ rights emerge at the forefront of public discourse and national politics in ways that would once have been hard to imagine. Focusing on the small screens of Europe and North America, Lesbians on Television maps the contemporary shifts in lesbian visibility within popular media and, from this, extracts a figure of the new 'lesbian normal' that both helps and hinders those it represents. This book offers a unique and layered account of the complex dynamics in the modern moment of social change, drawing together critical social and cultural theory as well empirical research, which includes interviews and multi-platform media analyses.

Lesbians on Television is available Open Access here.

Kate's current research has two central strands:

- The politics of televisual nostalgia and

- Contemporary representations, rights and social shifts around queer/LGBTQ+ families.

Kate would welcome PhD applications on topic including: LGBTQ+ representation/queer media; gender and media; media and social issues/change; audiences/fandoms; social media and activism/social change; youth media; television studies on themes including: nostalgia; youthification; representation; EDI on and off screen.

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Kate R Saunders

Lecturer, Monash University
Kate Saunders is a lecturer in the Department of Econometrics and Business Statistics whose research interests are in statistical climatology. Her primary focus is on modelling climate extremes; and understanding how the probability of extreme events might be influenced by climate change. Other interests include; statistical post-processing of meteorological forecasts, quality control of meteorological data and how to estimate the risk posed by compound weather events. Kate’s research improves our understanding of the probability of extreme climate/weather events and helps us to make informed decisions about natural disaster risk.

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Katelyn Best

Teaching Assistant Professor of Musicology, West Virginia University
Katelyn Best is a Teaching Assistant Professor of Musicology at West Virginia University. A musicologist and vocalist by training, she earned her B.M. in vocal performance from Saint Mary’s College followed by her M.M. and Ph.D. in musicology from Florida State University. She served as a lecturer for the Department of Musicology at Florida State University as well as the Department of Anthropology and African Studies at Johannes Gutenberg University. She was also Co-Director of the Florida State University’s Andean Ensemble and Director of the World Music Ensemble Summer Music Program.

As a scholar, her research explores music in Deaf culture, hip hop, sound studies, musical movements, and cultural activism. She received a Carol Krebs Research Fellow Award to conduct fieldwork throughout the U.S. and was awarded the Society for Ethnomusicology (SEM) Crossroads Music and Social Justice Paper Prize and the SEM Applied Ethnomusicology Paper/Project Prize for work based on this research. She has presented this work both nationally and internationally and has published articles within Lied und Populäre Kultur and the Journal of American Sign Languages and Literatures, a peer-reviewed digital journal with publications in American Sign Language. Forthcoming book chapters include “Expanding Musical Inclusivity: Representing and Re-presenting Music and Deaf Culture through Deaf Hip Hop Performance” in Participatory Approaches to Music and Democracy and “Ethnocentrism 2.0: The Impact of Hearing-Centrism on Musical Expression in Deaf Culture” in At the Crossroads: Music and Social Justice.

In addition to her work at West Virginia University, she is a member of the International Association for the Study of Popular Music (IASPM), the British Forum for Ethnomusicology (BFE), and the Society for Ethnomusicology (SEM). She served as a remote referee for the European Research Council and is an active member of the SEM Applied Ethnomusicology Section, the Crossroads Section for Difference and Representation, and the Popular Music Section. She was also a founding committee member and former chair for the SEM Disability and Deaf Studies Special Interest Group. She currently serves as Co-Director and Publicist for the Society for Ethnomusicology Orchestra and is co-editor of At the Crossroads: Music and Social Justice (Indiana University Press).

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Katelyn Dyason

Project manager and psychologist, School of Psychiatry, UNSW Sydney
Dr Katelyn Dyason is a registered psychologist and completed her combined clinical Masters and research PhD at Griffith University in 2019. In only a few years she has accrued a broad and relevant clinical experience across clinical trials, private practice, university clinic, hospitals and headspace. She has research interests in paediatric mental health, including obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and on the impact of feedback and outcome monitoring on improvements in psychotherapy. Katelyn is currently working for the OCD BOUNCE team at Sydney Children's Hospitals Network and University of New South Wales as a Project Manager and Psychologist.

Doctor of Philosophy (Clinical Psychology)

Bachelor of Psychology (Honours)

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Katerina Hadjimatheou

Lecturer in Criminology and Ethics, University of Essex
Katerina Hadjimatheou is an applied ethicist and criminologist. Her work examines the implications of new developments in digital technologies and use of data for public security and policing and been published in leading criminology and philosophy journals including British Journal of Criminology and Law and Philosophy.

Kat has more than 10 years experience working on interdisciplinary research projects funded by the European Commission, the EU Border Agency, and the UK’s Economic and Social Research Council. She is a recognised expert in the ethics of technologies in a security and policing context and has been invited to provide consultation and advice to the Ministry of Justice, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, the UK’s College of Policing, and the National Police Chief’s Council. She is an independent member of governmental and non-governmental bodies including the UK National Crime Agency's Independent Advisory Group on Ethics; Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs Professional Standards Committee; the Independent Digital Ethics Policing Panel; and the Metropolitan Police's Research Ethics Committee. Kat is also the independent ethics reviewer for a number of EU-funded technology projects including D4FLY and ARESIBO projects (on biometric border technologies) and COPKIT (on big data for community policing).

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Kateryna Shynkaruk

Senior Lecturer of International Relations, Texas A&M University
Kateryna Shynkaruk, Ph.D., is a senior lecturer in Eastern European Politics, European Security and International Relations Theory at the Bush School of Government and Public Service in Washington, D.C. She is a nonresident scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Shynkaruk has over 15 years of experience working in academia, with think tanks and diplomatic missions. Her research interests cover Eastern Europe, Ukraine’s foreign and security policy and the role of ideas and culture in International Relations. She earned a Ph.D. in Global Political Affairs in 2011 from National Taras Shevchenko University of Kyiv. Her doctoral thesis focused on emergence of Ukraine’s foreign policy identity as an international actor.

Shynkaruk has over 30 publications on the topics of post-communist transformations in Ukraine and across Eastern Europe. She was a team leader in several cross-country research projects on democratic reforms in East European countries, such as the European Integration Index for Eastern Partnership Countries. From 2013 to 2020, she worked as a political analyst at the U.S. Embassy in Ukraine and received several high-level awards from the Department of State, including the Superior Honor Award in 2018 and the Meritorious Honor Award in 2017. Between 2007 and 2013, she covered Ukraine’s foreign and security policy as a senior research fellow at the Kyiv-based Institute for Economic Research and Policy Consulting.

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Kath Murray

Research Fellow in Criminology, The University of Edinburgh
Dr Murray is a criminal justice researcher, with a background in policy-based research, using qualitative and quantitative methods. She completed her doctoral research on police use of stop and search in 2014, for which she received the Economic and Social Research (ESRC) Outstanding Early Career Impact prize. She has since undertaken a range of projects, including research on children’s experiences of offending and victimization, public confidence in Scottish policing, the devolution of railway policing and the age of criminal responsibility. She has also worked on the Scottish Crime and Justice Survey.
She also writes on the formulation of policy and legislation relating to sex and gender identity in Scotland, as part of the MurrayBlackburnMackenzie Policy Analysis Collective.

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Katharina Domnanich

Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Michigan State University
At the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) a plethora of by-product radionuclides will be created that are of immense societal value for a number of disciplines, viz. nuclear medicine, plant biology, material science, astrophysics and stockpile stewardship science. It is an ambitious endeavor to collect these rare radionuclides at sub-nanomolar levels from the vast amount of cooling water, radiochemically purify them, and finally transfer them into a chemical form that is required for the specific applications. So far, the feasibility of ‘isotope harvesting’ was already probed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL). The next step will involve a translation towards the conditions at FRIB, where challenges like considerably increased levels of radioactivity, diluted in a greatly larger water volume will be met.

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Katharina Fenz

Data Scientist with World Data Lab and Lecturer in Machine Learning and Data Science, Vienna University of Economics and Business
Katharina Fenz is a seasoned data scientist and economist with extensive expertise in research and econometric modelling. Serving as a lead data scientist at the World Data Lab, she specialises in socioeconomic predictions at both national and granular geographical levels. With a multifaceted background in academia, Katharina has contributed to scientific research, programme management and graduate supervision, and has leveraged her expertise to educate on data science, machine learning, and macroeconomics at the Vienna University of Economics and Business. To disseminate her knowledge to clients and partners, she is also leading training on data science for international institutions and national statistical offices.

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Katharina Miller

Adjunct professor, IE University
Katharina Miller is founding partner of the boutique consultancy firm 3C Compliance and the multidisciplinary law firm Miller International Knowledge.She is a qualified lawyer in Germany and Spain with over 15 years of international practice across Western Europe. She has strong expertise in German and Spanish Corporate Governance and in the interface between Compliance & Ethics and business. Also beyond her professional activities, she is regularly consulted in ESG, CSR, and Corporate Compliance matters, for example on EU level.

Furthermore, she is a committed Non-Executive Member of various advisory and supervisory boards across industries and countries. Here, she contributes especially with legal, operational and risk management experience and in the fields ESG, Women Rights and Innovation & Technology worldwide.

Her professional activities are strongly related to the implementation of the Agenda 2030, because for her it's of utmost importance to find solutions for our living together in the "The Fourth Industrial Revolution" by implementing the 17 Sustainable Development Goals of the United Nations (SGDs).

Under the external actions of the European Commission she has been advising the Kosovo Women’s Network on the EU Gender Equality Acquis (2018-2020). As consultant with GIZ she has been advising the Peruvian Government on how to best protect women that have been victims of Gender Based Violence (2022).

She is outgoing Head of the EU delegation at the G20/W20 as well as Ethics, Research and Innovation Expert and Appraiser for the European Commission. I was the first ambassador & change agent with Global Leadership Academy (GIZ), former President of European Women Lawyers Association 2017-2022 and in Spain one of Top 100 Women Leaders 2017 & 2018. Furthermore, she has the honour to be member of the Advisory Board of the Berkeley Center on Comparative Equality and Anti-Discrimination Law of the Berkeley Law School.

Languages: German (native), Spanish (fluent), English (fluent), French (fluent).

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Katharina Naswall

Professor of Organisational Psychology, University of Canterbury
Katharina's research focuses on employee well-being and factors which lead to psychologically healthy workplaces, using psychology. She often collaborates with organisations in the diagnostic of stress and wellbeing, along with the implementation of initiatives aimed at increasing health and wellbeing at work, applying psychological principles and knowledge about human behaviour and emotions. She has worked on several projects on how organisations and managers can make a positive difference and contribute to employee wellbeing.

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Katharina Scheidgen

Chair of Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen
My research centers around the broader topics of entrepreneurship and innovation.
I'm particularly interested in the social embeddedness of entrepreneurial processes, e.g. networks and tie formation, entrepreneurial teams, and entrepreneurial ecosystems, and address issues around digitization, social innovation as well as high-tech innovation.

Understanding how entrepreneurs acquire resources during the very early days of their new ventures motivated my PhD research. By comparing tie formation in Silicon Valley and Berlin, I showed how the entrepreneurial ecosystems in each of these regions influence how entrepreneurs approach first investors and customers.

As PostDoc, I joined the Research Center for Digital Transformation at Leuphana University Lüneburg, spent six months at the University of Amsterdam as visiting scholar and became an affiliated researcher at Lund University.

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Katharine Charsley

Professor of Migration Studies, University of Bristol
Katharine Charsley is Professor of Migration Studies at the School of Sociology Politics and International Studies at the University of Bristol. She specialises in the area of gender, family and migration, particularly transnational marriage. She is currently PI of the ESRC-funded project 'UK-EU Couples after Brexit: migrantization and the UK family immigration regime' - www.brexitcouples.ac.uk

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Katharine Haynes

Snr Research Fellow, Risk Frontiers Natural Hazards Research Centre, Macquarie University

Dr Katharine Haynes is a senior Research Fellow at Risk Frontiers specialising in disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation. She has a strong commitment to ensuring that her research impacts on policy and practice. In May 2015 Katharine was awarded the Australian Academy of Science Prize for Innovation, Research and Education (ASPIRE). The award recognized her contributions in the area of Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation for an Australian scientist under the age of 40. She was the Australian nomination and a runner up for the wider Asia-Pacific ASPIRE prize.

Katharine’s research interests include risk communication, preparedness and response, community and youth-based disaster risk reduction and the implementation and adaptation of policy and organisational procedure. She has considerable experience conducting qualitative interviews and quantitative surveys with members of the public, emergency management practitioners, professionals and policy makers.

Katharine has experience working on a range of hazards and risks within: Montserrat, WI; Philippines; Indonesia; Australia and the United Kingdom. Katharine was called as an expert witness at the 2009 Victorian Bushfires Royal Commission, following the Black Saturday bushfire disaster. She has completed work and provided expert advice for a range of emergency services, government departments, private organisations and international NGO’s.

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Katharine Quarmby

Royal Literary Fund Fellow, University of West London
Katharine Quarmby has written non-fiction, short stories and books for children. Her debut novel, The Low Road, based on a true story from her hometown from the 1800s, was published by Unbound in 2023.

Katharine is a Royal Literary Fund (RLF) Fellow at the University of West London, having previously been an RLF Fellow at the London School of Economics.

Katharine is also an investigative journalist and editor, with particular interests in disability, the environment, race and ethnicity and the care system. She has worked for over a decade for BBC and other broadcasters and served in a variety of correspondent and associate editor roles for outlets including the Economist, Newsweek Europe and Prospect. She has been production and digital editor of the Bureau of Investigative Journalism and is currently editor at Investigative Reporting Denmark.

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Katharine Seton

Immunology Research Scientist, ME/CFS Research, Quadram Institute
I am a postdoctoral research scientist with a background in immunology and myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) research.

I obtained a Bachelor of Science (BSc) degree from Newcastle University in 2016. During my undergraduate degree I was awarded a vacation scholarship from the Wellcome Trust which was used to study the heritability of ME/CFS over 8 weeks. After obtaining my BSc I moved to Norwich to undertake a PhD based at the Quadram Institute, which was funded by the UK charity Invest in ME Research. My PhD investigated the immune response to gut microbes in ME/CFS patients.

I am now at the Quadram Institute as an immunology research scientist in the Gut Microbes and Health programme where my principle role is to determine whether ME/CFS patients have premature ageing of the immune system because of chronic exposure to gut microbes. I will be working on the phase IIb clinical trial of faecal microbiota transplantation in ME/CFS patients (RESTORE-ME study).

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Katharine Wallis

Professor Katharine Wallis is Mayne Professor and Head, Mayne Academy of General Practice and Head, General Practice Clinical Unit at the University of Queensland Medical School. She is a Fellow of both the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine and the Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners currently practising part-time as a GP on the Gold Coast.

Katharine’s research focuses on patient safety in primary care, in particular supporting safer prescribing in general practice. Current projects include RELEASE: REdressing Long-tErm Antidepressant uSE in general practice funded by a MRFF 2020 Clinician Researchers: Applied Research in Health grant; RELEASE: Think-Aloud study with patients to optimise RELEASE resources, funded by the Mayne Bequest; a pilot study in general practice of the 3-Domains screening toolkit for older driver medical assessment in general practice, funded by the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners Foundation / Motor Accident Insurance Commission; and a validation study of the 3-Domains toolkit in older Australian drivers in the Princess Alexandra Hospital Occupational Therapy Driving Assessment & Rehabilitation Service also funded by the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners Foundation / Motor Accident Insurance Commission; and Mind the gaps: preparedness of new general practitioner fellows for independent practice’ project funded by the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners Education Research grant. She is Founding Director of the practice-based research network UQGP Research. Other research interests include medical ethics and medical professional regulation.

Katharine’s alma mater is the University of Otago in New Zealand. She joined UQ in late 2019 from the University of Auckland. Katharine’s previous roles include Associate Editor of the Rural and Remote Health Journal; Associate Editor Journal Primary Health Care; member Health Practitioners Disciplinary Tribunal, Medical Council of New Zealand (2004-2019); member Medicines Adverse Reactions Committee, Medsafe, Ministry of Health (2010-2017); member Perinatal & Maternal Mortality Review Committee, Maternal Mortality Working Group, Health Quality & Safety Commission (2014-2017); and member Ethics Committee, New Zealand Medical Association (2013-2018). Current roles include Deputy Chair of the Australasian Association for Academic Primary Care, Academic Policy and Advocacy committee; and member Oxford International Primary Care Research Leadership Programme, University of Oxford.

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Katherine Astbury

Associate Professor and Reader of French, University of Warwick
In October 2013 I began an AHRC-funded project on French Theatre of the Napoleonic Era. This project involves a team of doctoral and postdoctoral researchers working on linking close textual readings to larger cultural, social and political issues. I am currently putting the finishing touches to a critical edition of Pixerécourt's La Forteresse du Danube (1805) for the playwright's complete works being published by Garnier.

In 2012 I published a monograph on 'non-political' fiction of the 1790s as a response to the trauma of the Revolution (Narrative Responses to the trauma of the French Revolution (Oxford, Legenda, 2012)). The research has shown how the apparent continuity of Ancien Régime tropes, settings and characters is in fact an indication of writers' traumatised response to the Revolution.

My first book on The Moral Tale in France and Germany 1750-1789, examining the development of short fiction in the two countries in the years leading up to the French Revolution, was published by the Voltaire Foundation as SVEC 2002:7. Much of my work is centred on questions of literary history and the thorny problem of literary influence.

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Katherine Bates

Lecturer in Initial Teacher Education: English Specialisation, University of Technology Sydney
MEd (Distinction)., BE.d.

Links to publications: https://profiles.uts.edu.au/Katherine.Bates/publications

Link to doctoral study: How do visual prompts shape students’ written responses?

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Katherine Brickell

Professor of Urban Studies, King's College London
Katherine Brickell is Professor of Urban Studies in the Department of Geography at King's College London. She is a feminist geographer whose research focuses on experiences of precarious home and working lives.

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Katherine Brown

Professor of Paediatric Cardiac Intensive Care, UCL
Professor Kate Brown has been a consultant in Paediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Unit at Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust (GOSH) for more than 20 years. Kate has a Masters in public health and is the Centre Lead for Outcomes of Children’s Cardiovascular Disease and Critical Illness at the Children’s Institute of Cardiovascular Science, University College London (UCL). Kate’s research interests lie in children's critical illness and children's heart disease, including evaluation of treatments, long-term impacts, and parent and child experiences of critical illness.

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Katherine Dafforn

Senior Research Associate in Marine Ecology, UNSW Australia

I am a marine ecologist and science communicator working at the University of New South Wales. I work with the Applied Marine Ecology and Ecotoxicology Lab in the School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences and am also a member of the Evolution and Ecology Research Centre. You will find me working in my office or lab at UNSW or from the labs and aquarium at the Sydney Institute of Marine Sciences, where I am involved in the Sydney Harbour Research Program.

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Katherine Dickin

Associate Professor of Public & Ecosystem Health, Cornell University
Katherine Dickin conducts formative and implementation research on the effectiveness of community-based programs to improve nutritional status and reduce health inequities in the U.S. and globally. This includes qualitative and quantitative research on maternal and child nutrition, responsive parenting and social support, food security, obesity prevention, capacity building for multisectoral nutrition and sustainable food systems. A central focus is the interface between public health practitioners and communities, to understand contextual influences on delivery and use of interventions for low-income families. In her teaching, she focuses on experiential learning in global and public health, and mentoring on research methods. Engaging with communities and students, she aims to design programs reflecting local knowledge, norms, and values.

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