Menu

Search

Jason Byrne

Associate Professor of Environmental Planning, Griffith University

Jason Byrne is an urban geographer. He undertook his PhD at the University of Southern California (Los Angeles) where he was a fellow in the Center for Sustainable Cities. Jason is also a Senior Fellow with the Johns Hopkins University Institute for Policy Studies. He was previously a town planner and environmental policy officer with the Western Australian government. Jason's research interests include: urban nature and urban ecology; park and green-space planning; environmental equity and justice; open space and residential density; ecological sustainability; and climate change justice.

  More

Less

Javier E. Sanchez-Galan

Associate research scientist, Universidad Tecnológica de Panamá

Since August 2013, I am a research scientist at Universidad Tecnológica de Panama affiliated with the Grupo de Investigación en Biotecnología, Bioinformática y Biología de Sistemas (GIBBS) at the Centro de Producción e Investigaciones Agroindustriales - (CEPIA). Since February 2015, I am a also an adjunct researcher at Institute of Scientific Research and High Technology Services (INDICASAT-AIP).

My main research objective is to promote and expand the use of computer tools coupled with statistical analysis, machine learning and data mining techniques to derive biological insight from high-throughput biomedical data. I am also interest in diverse areas of computation, such as: high performance scientific computing and systems biology.

I completed my Ph.D. in Experimental Medicine and my MSc. in Computer Science (Bioinformatics) at McGill University, in Montreal, Canada. Previously I obtained a BSc. in Computer Systems Engineering at UniversIdad Tecnológica de Panamá.

  More

Less

Jay L. Zagorsky

Since 1995 I have held the position of Research Scientist at The Ohio State University, where I collect data as part of the National Longitudinal Surveys on income, wealth, and life experiences of thousands of Americans. My personal finance research has been widely quoted in the media and has been highlighted in the Wall Street Journal, USA Today, Fox News, Good Morning America, Scientific American and numerous other news outlets.

Besides publishing numerous scholarly articles I wrote the book "Business Information: Finding and Using Data in the Digital Age" for McGraw-Hill/Irwin and "Business Macroeconomics: A Guide for Managers, Traders and Practical People." More information on the macroeconomics book can be found at http://businessmacroeconomics.com/.

I also teach at Boston University's School of Management. From 1988 to the present my teaching has spanned a wide range of levels from senior executives taking intensive classes to high school students encountering economic theories for the first time. I have taught giant lectures of over 450 students, classes of fifty, and small seminars with fewer than ten people.

My personal blog is found here http://u.osu.edu/zagorsky.1/

  More

Less

Jay Sexton

I was born and raised in Salina, Kansas, a town near the geographic center of the contiguous United States. I read History and English at the University of Kansas. I first came to Oxford on an undergraduate study abroad year and was immediately drawn to the tutorial system. I was fortunate to return to Britain as a post-graduate Marshall Scholar at Worcester College, Oxford. After finishing a D.Phil. in modern history, I went to Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge on a Junior Research Fellowship, before assuming my present post as University Lecturer in American History and Tutorial Fellow in History at Corpus Christi College.

My principal research focuses on nineteenth century American history. From the perspective of the twenty-first century, the rise of the United States appears natural and inevitable. Yet there was nothing pre-ordained about the consolidation of the American Union, nor the establishment of the American empire. I am interested in why this group of former British colonies bound together and how their fragile union survived fundamental ideological and political disputes, such as those unleashed by the entrenchment of slavery in the Southern states. Most of my research has focused on nineteenth century US foreign relations and Americans' paradoxical relationship with empire. As Americans struggled to free themselves from their colonial past, they constructed their own empire, engaged in their own conquests, and exercised effective control over other peoples. My work connects the United States' foreign relations with its project of nation-building at home.

In addition to the above, I have secondary research interests in the American Civil War, international finance and economics in the nineteenth century, Anglo-American relations, and US cultural expansion.

I supervise post-graduate researchers working on America in the world in the nineteenth and early twentieth century, the American Civil War, and US economic development.

  More

Less

Jean Ker Walsh

Postdoctoral Associate, Victoria University

Dr Jean Ker Walsh is working on a book based on her thesis and her career experience in political journalism, as a political media adviser and strategic communications specialist.

  More

Less

Jeanette Kennett

Professor of Philosophy, Macquarie University

Jeanette joined Macquarie in 2009 as a CoRE joint appointment between the Philosophy Department and the Macquarie Centre for Cognitive Science. After completing her PhD in 1994 she spent a further ten years in the Philosophy Department at Monash as Lecturer/Senior Lecturer. From 2004 - 2008 she was Principal Research Fellow in The Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics at the Australian National University and also at Charles Sturt University (2008-9).

  More

Less

Jeff Bessen

Ph.D. Candidate in Chemical Biology, Harvard University

I am a graduate student in the Chemistry and Chemical Biology Dept at Harvard University. I specialize in protein evolution and genome editing.

  More

Less

Jeff Borland

Jeff Borland is Professor of Economics at the University of Melbourne. In 2010 he was Visiting Chair of Australian Studies at Harvard University, and he has also held visiting positions at ANU, University of Iowa and University of Wisconsin-Madison. His main research interests are the operation of labour markets in Australia, program and policy evaluation, economics of sport, and Australian economic history. He currently teaches subjects in Introductory Microeconomics, Australian Economic History, and World Economic History.

  More

Less

Jeff Kunerth

Visiting Instructor, Journalism, Nicholson School of Communication , University of Central Florida

Jeff Kunerth joins the faculty after 41 years as a reporter with the Orlando Sentinel, where he won numerous awards including a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in 2013. He is the author of Trout: A True Story of Teens, Murder and the Death Penalty, and Florida’s Paved Bike Trails, now in it’s third edition.

Prior to joining the faculty, Kunerth taught writing and reporting for 15 years as an adjunct at Rollins College and UCF, where he received an award of recognition in 2010 for excellence in teaching. Kunerth received his Bachelor’s degree in journalism from Iowa State University and his MFA from Goucher College. Kunerth comes from a family of journalists. His father, Bill Kunerth, taught journalism for 30 years at Iowa State University. His brother, Bill B. Kunerth, was a newspaper publisher for more than 30 years.

He is married to Gretchen Kunerth. They have two sons, Chad and Jesse, and live in Altamonte Springs.

  More

Less

Jeffrey H. Cohen

I am a cultural anthropologist and my research focuses on several themes including: Migration and Refugees, Economics and Development, Nutrition, and Methodology.

Since the early 1990s I have studied migration from communities in Oaxaca, Mexico to the US with support from the National Science Foundation. I also conduct comparative research on Mexican, Dominican and Turkish migration.

My work on food and eating insects in Mexico was supported by the National Geographic Society.

I have served as an expert witness on several criminal and immigration/refugee cases and consulted on marketing and cultural issues with Fortune 500 companies.

In my latest book, EATING SOUP WITHOUT A SPOON: ANTHROPOLOGICAL THEORY AND METHOD IN THE REAL WORLD, I explore how to conduct research. You can learn more at: http://utpress.utexas.edu/index.php/books/cohen-eating-soup-without-a-spoon

  More

Less

Jeffrey Knapp

Jeffrey Knapp has been with UNSW since 2007. Jeffrey’s background is in income tax (Coopers & Lybrand), financial reporting and audit advice (the Institute of Chartered Accountants in Australia) and teaching consolidation accounting (Macquarie University). Jeffrey’s strengths are his knowledge of accounting standards and his forensic ability to uncover financial reporting irregularities. Jeffrey is one of Australia’s most active media commentators on financial reporting regulation and practice. During 2010-2015, Jeffrey has publicly exposed omissions and irregularities in the financial reports of various large Australian companies that are politically and/or economically important.

  More

Less

Jeffrey Powell

Jeffrey R. Powell did his undergraduate work at the University of Notre Dame where he started working on the mosquito Aedes aegypti under the direction of George B. Craig. In 1969 he went to graduate school at The Rockefeller University where he began empirical population genetics studies of Drosophila under the mentorship of Theodosius Dobzhansky. He obtained his Ph. D. in 1972 from the University of California, Davis, where he moved with Dobzhansky in 1971. He began as an Assistant Professor at Yale in 1972 and has been on the faculty since. He has spent sabbatical leaves at the University of California (Riverside), University of Rome, California Institute of Technology, and Cambridge University. He continues to work on Drosophila and mosquitoes, while initiating in 1991 a research program on genetics of Galápagos tortoises that has taken on a life of its own. His major interests are basic issues of evolutionary genetics and molecular evolution largely using Drosophila as a model organism and application of genetic technologies and concepts to mosquitoes to aid in control of diseases they transmit. He has mentored 23 Ph. D. students to completion, 24 postdoctorals, and >40 undergraduates, as well as hosted six sabbatical visitors.

  More

Less

Jeffrey W Paller

Post-doctoral Research Fellow, Columbia University

I am a postdoctoral research fellow at the Earth Institute at Columbia University, working with the Center for Sustainable Urban Development. I use ethnography, focus groups, surveys, and experimental methods to examine the political conditions under which democratic activity and accountability develop in poor urban communities. I received my PhD from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in the department of political science in 2014. My dissertation received the 2014 African Politics Conference Group-Lynne Rienner Award for Best Dissertation in African Politics. My research has been funded by the Social Science Research Council, National Science Foundation, and the University of Wisconsin. I was a Research Associate at the Center for Democratic Development in Ghana in 2012. Prior to graduate school, I graduated with honors from Northwestern University and served as a Program Coordinator for the Illinois Education Foundation. During the academic year 2014-15, I was a Visiting Lecturer of Politics at Bates College. In 2016, I will be an Assistant Professor of Politics at University of San Francisco.

  More

Less

Jeffrey W. Rubin

Associate Professor of History, Boston University

A specialist on social movements in Latin America, Rubin combines innovative methodological approaches with the study of democratic possibility in Latin America over the past thirty years. Rubin’s work is ethnographic, collaborative, interdisciplinary, and transnational.

Jeffrey W. Rubin is the author of Decentering the Regime: Ethnicity, Radicalism, and Democracy in Juchitán, Mexico (Duke 1997), co-author of Sustaining Activism: A Brazilian Women's Movement and a Father-Daughter Collaboration (Duke 2013), and co-editor of Enduring Reform: Progressive Activism and Business Responses in Latin America's Democracies (Pittsburgh 2014), Lived Religion and Lived Citizenship in Latin America's Zones of Crisis (Latin American Research Review 2014), and Beyond Civil Society: Activism, Participation, and Protest in 21st Century Latin America (Duke, forthcoming).

Rubin’s current project, Seeing and Not Seeing: Essays on Democratic Possibility in Latin America and Beyond, argues that in order to understand the dynamic and unstable mixes of democracy and violence, economic expansion and continuing exclusions, that characterize Latin America today – and to discern possibilities for and limits to progressive reform in this context – it is essential to conceptualize historical forces and political actors not as coherent and bounded, but rather as made up of multiple and changing forces, strands, and cultures.

  More

Less

Jen Webb

Director of the Centre for Creative and Cultural Research, University of Canberra

Jen Webb is Distinguished Professor of Creative Practice, and Director of the Centre for Creative and Cultural Research in the Faculty of Arts and Design. Her current research includes an ARC-funded investigation of creative practice (using poetry as a case study), and an ARC-funded investigation of outcomes for graduates of creative arts degrees.

  More

Less

Jennie C. Stephens

Jennie C. Stephens is the Blittersdorf Professor of Sustainability Science and Policy at the University of Vermont’s Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources and the College of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences. Professor Stephens’ research, teaching, and community engagement focus on socio-political aspects of energy technology innovation, electricity system change, climate change communication, and facilitating social learning in the transition from fossil-fuel to renewables based energy systems. She has contributed to understanding the social dynamics of wind power, carbon capture and storage, and smart grid, and brings experience in stakeholder engagement and communication among experts, practitioners, academics, and the public.

Professor Stephens was previously on the faculty at Clark University (2005-2014), and she did post-doctoral research at Harvard’s Kennedy School (2002-2005). She earned her PhD (2002) at Caltech in Environmental Science and Engineering and her BA (1997) at Harvard in Environmental Science and Public Policy.

  More

Less

Jennifer Johns

Senior Lecturer in International Business and Economic Geography, University of Liverpool

Dr. Jennifer Johns’ research interests are primarily concerned with network approaches to economic development and have two interrelated strands: industrial agglomeration local economic development, and geographies of innovation and entrepreneurship. Previous research projects include creative industries in the North West, temporary staffing markets in Japan, Sweden, Australia and the UK, and the global production networks of the video games industry. Primary research has been conducted in a wide range of international contexts. Her current research projects include innovation and entrepreneurship in collaborative spaces in Manchester, Tokyo and Barcelona and research on cities.

Jennifer trained as an economic geographer before moving to management. She works on research issues of inter-disciplinary interest including globalisation, the agglomeration of economic activities, entrepreneurship and innovation and global trade and production networks.

  More

Less

Jennifer MacRitchie

Research Lecturer in Music Perception and Cognition, Western Sydney University

Dr MacRitchie joined the Music Cognition and Action research program at MARCS Institute in 2014. With a background in both electrical engineering and music, her research focuses on the acquisition and development of motor skills in piano performance. Studies range from looking at movements of novices to experts, from those who have studied music from a young age to those who are rediscovering music in retirement.

Jennifer serves as Associate Editor of Frontiers in Psychology, Performance Science, and is on the editorial board of Musicae Scientiae. She has conducted research in a variety of environments, completing her doctoral work in University of Glasgow's Science and Music Research group, and a postdoctoral position at the Conservatorio della Svizzera Italiana in Lugano, Switzerland.

Jennifer is also an experienced pianist, having performed concertos by Grieg, Shostakovich and Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue with amateur orchestras in Glasgow, UK, as well as regular performances with chamber groups in the UK, Switzerland and Australia.

  More

Less

Jennifer Mercieca

Associate Professor of Communication and Director of the Aggie Agora, Texas A&M University

Jennifer Mercieca is an historian of American political discourse, especially discourses about citizenship, democracy, and the presidency. Her scholarship combines American history with rhetorical and political theory in an effort to understand democratic practices. She argues that current views of citizenship rely upon the tragic and ironic views, which do not enable citizens to act to control their government.

Her presidency research argues that we have heroic expectations for the presidency that are both unrealistic and unconstitutional and that these expectations burden the presidency. She is the author of Founding Fictions and the co-Editor of The Rhetoric of Heroic Expectations: Establishing the Obama Presidency.

Her essays have appeared in scholarly journals like Rhetoric & Public Affairs, The Quarterly Journal of Speech, and Presidential Studies Quarterly.

Dr. Mercieca teaches undergraduate and graduate courses on Political Communication, Presidential Rhetoric, Activism, Citizenship & the Public Sphere, Social Movements, Rhetorical Theory, and the History of American Public Discourse. Dr. Mercieca frequently appears as an expert commentator and as a consultant for news stories.

  More

Less

Jennifer Power

Research Fellow at Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society, La Trobe University

Jennifer is a Research Fellow at the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society, La Trobe University. Her current areas of research are: HIV, sexuality and gender. She also has a research background in lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered parenting and family studies.

  More

Less

Jenny Adams

Jenny Adams, Associate Professor, holds a Ph.D. and an A.M. in English Literature from the University of Chicago, and a B.A. in English Literature and French Language and Literature from UCLA. She specializes in later medieval literature, and her current research focuses on medieval student debt and university life in England. She is at work on a monograph provisionally titled “Unlocking St. Frideswide’s Chest: Student Debt and University Life in Medieval Oxford.” With Nancy Bradbury (Smith College) she is also editing an essay collection titled “Objects of Medieval Women.” Her past research has been on chess and political organization in the late Middle Ages, and she has articles on this and other subjects in Studies in the Age of Chaucer, the Journal of English Germanic Philology, Essays in Medieval Studies, The Chaucer Review, Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Teaching, and the Journal of Popular Culture. Her book, Power Play: The Literature and Politics of Chess in the Late Middle Ages (University of Pennsylvania Press) appeared in 2006, and her edition of William Caxton's The Game and Playe of the Chesse (TEAMS Middle English Texts series) came out in 2009. She has received fellowships from the NEH, the ACLS, and the Newberry Library.

  More

Less

Jenny McGuire

Research Scientist in Biology, Georgia Institute of Technology

In the McGuire Lab at the School of Biology we are interested in posing hypotheses about the evolutionary and ecological implications of climate change and using the rich paleontological record of the last several million years to test those hypotheses.

  More

Less

Jerome N Rachele

Dr Jerome Rachele is a Research Fellow at the Institute for Health and Ageing, Australian Catholic University and the NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence in Healthy, Liveable Communities. His research centres on investigating causal relationships between built environment and health and wellbeing outcomes using data from longitudinal studies and natural experiments.

  More

Less

Jess Carniel

Professional Memberships:

Secretary of the Cultural Studies Association of Australasia
Australian and New Zealand Shakespeare Association (member)

Research Interests:

Australian and global migration, multiculturalism, race and ethnicity, cultural studies, sport (esp. soccer), popular culture, Australian studies, Eurovision, gender studies.

Most Recent Research Outcomes:

"Skirting the issue: finding queer and geopolitical belonging at the Eurovision Song Contest," Contemporary Southeastern Europe, vol. 2, no. 1 (2015), pp. 136-154.

Review of Tony Bennett (ed.), Challenging (the) humanities, (Melbourne: Australian Scholarly Publishing, 2013), Queensland Review, vol. 21, no. 2 (December 2014), pp. 235-236.

“Of Nerds and Men: Dimensions and Discourses of Masculinity in Nerds FC,” in The Sports Documentary: Critical Essays, eds Zachary Inglis and David Sutera, Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press, 2013.

“In the spirit of reconciliation: migrating spirits and Australian postcolonial multiculturalism in Hoa Pham’s Vixen,” in Spectral Identities: Ghosting in Literature and Film, eds Melanie Anderson and Lisa Sloan, Newark: University of Delaware Press, 2013.

  More

Less

Jessica Ford

Early Career Researcher in Television, Gender, Film and Media Studies, UNSW Australia

Jessica Ford is an early career researcher, tutor and casual lecturer at the School of the Arts & Media, UNSW. Jessica is also the Co-Founder of the Sydney Screen Studies Network. She lectures and tutors in film studies, media studies and gender studies and has published essays on Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Community and Girls. Her research interests lie in contemporary American postnetwork television and television histories with a focus on gender and feminism.

  More

Less

Jill Slay

Professor Jill Slay's research has focused on Forensic Computing for the last ten years although she has a well-established international research reputation in a range of aspects of cyber security including critical infrastructure protection and cyber terrorism.

With a variety of collaborators, she has instigated cross-disciplinary research that draws on social science, anthropology, law, drugs and crime, police and justice studies, as well as systems and communications engineering and IT, to achieve its aims. She has supervised 16 PhD students to completion, and 30 of her Honours and Masters graduates are employed in developing computer forensic and IT security software and networking solutions for industry and the Australian Federal government. She advises industry and government on strategy and policy in this research domain.

Jill has published one book and more than 120 refereed book chapters, journal articles or research papers in forensic computing, information assurance, critical infrastructure protection, complex systems and education. She has been awarded approximately AUD2 million in grant funding since 2005.

Jill is a Fellow of the International Information Systems Security Certification Consortium (ISC2) and a member of its Board. She was made a member of the Order of Australia (AM) in 2011 for her service to the information technology industry through contributions in the areas of forensic computer science, security, protection of infrastructure and cyber-terrorism.

  More

Less

Jillian Jordan

Ph.D. Candidate in Psychology, Yale University

My research investigates human social cognition and behavior, with a focus on cooperation and morality. I integrate approaches from psychology, experimental economics, and evolutionary game theory. I’m interested in questions like: Why do humans condemn others for immoral or selfish behavior? How do we select collaborative interaction partners, and signal our quality as prospective partners? Why do we hate hypocrites?

  More

Less

Jillian Rickly

My research sits, most broadly, in the areas of geohumanities and mobilities, with more specific interests that weave together environmental perceptions; authenticity and alienation in travel motivation and experience; identity and bio-politics; and performance theories.

My research interests include: The relationship of touristic motivation to tourism experiences; Authenticity and alienation in tourism motivation and experience; Environmental perceptions, ethics, and uses of sustainability rhetoric; Lifestyle mobilities, lifestyle travel, and hypermobile lifestyle pursuits; Tourism marketing, geographic imaginaries, and identity politics of place branding; Critical heritage studies and museum studies.

  More

Less

Jim Minifie

Productivity Growth Program Director, Grattan Institute

Jim Minifie directs the Grattan Institute's Productivity Growth Program, which is focused on policy reforms to drive Australian living standards. His team is currently focused on structural change in the Australian economy.

Prior to joining Grattan in June 2012, Jim spent 13 years at the Boston Consulting Group, including seven years as Chief Economist for Australia and New Zealand. There he was responsible for leading the firm's thinking on economic challenges – including the global financial crisis, the resources boom and climate change – and their implications for Australian policymakers and corporate leaders. His clients included governments in Australia, Asia and the Middle East and firms in media, online marketplaces, financial services, agriculture, industrial goods, logistics, retail, and resources and commodities.

Examples of his work include:

Public policy and public economics:
• Policy development: growth policy; development policies for middle income economies; foreign investment policy;
• Policy assessment and cost-benefit analysis: assessment of industry development policies and transport infrastructure; climate change policy; energy asset privatisation; low-emissions energy finance;
• Market and contract design: water markets; vocational education market design, energy infrastructure selection and finance design.

Private sector strategy development:
• Regulatory strategy: health insurance, resources, transport infrastructure, airlines;
• Policy impact assessment and response development: trade policy, tax, R&D;
• Pricing and contract design: media & marketplaces, finance, commodity exports;
• Financial structuring and funding: cooperatives, financial crisis response in banking;
• Governance reviews: cooperatives, vocational education, resource management;
• Sustainability strategy development: retailing, resources.

Jim has a PhD in applied economics from Stanford University and honours and masters degrees in economics from the University of Melbourne. His research focused on contracts, incentives, and taxation.

  More

Less

Jim Watson

Jim Watson is Professor of Energy Policy at SPRU, University of Sussex, and joined UKERC as Research Director in February 2013. He was previously Director of the Sussex Energy Group at the University of Sussex from Dec 2008 to Jan 2013.

Jim trained as an engineer at Imperial College London and has a PhD in science and technology policy from Sussex. He has 20 years’ research experience on a range of energy, climate change and innovation policy issues. His most recent research has focused on the uncertainties facing carbon capture and storage technologies, low carbon innovation in China, community energy in the UK, and the governance implications of sustainable infrastructure systems.

He frequently advises UK government departments and other organisations. He was a lead expert with the UK Foresight project on Sustainable Energy Management and the Built Environment (2007-08), and has been a Specialist Adviser with House of Commons Committees on Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (2006-09) and Energy and Climate Change (2010-11). Jim has extensive international experience, including over ten years working on energy scenarios and energy innovation policies in China and India. In 2008, he spent three months as a Visiting Scholar at the Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University.

Jim is a council member of the British Institute for Energy Economics, and was its chair in 2011. He is also a member of DECC and Defra’s social science expert panel.

  More

Less

Jo Abbott

Dr Jo Abbott is a health psychologist, research fellow and the Deputy Director (Acting) of the National eTherapy Centre at Swinburne University of Technology. Dr Abbott's research interests include the development and evaluation of technology-delivered health interventions, sleep psychology, mental health, psycho-oncology and health psychology.

  More

Less

Joan Cook

Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Yale University

Dr. Joan Cook is an Associate Professor in the Yale School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and a 2015 Public Voices Fellow at The Op-Ed Project.

She has numerous publications in the traumatic stress and geriatric mental health fields, including scientific papers on the phenomenology, assessment and treatment of older adult trauma survivors.

Dr. Cook has worked clinically with a range of trauma survivors, including combat veterans and former prisoners of war, men and women who have been physically and sexually assaulted in childhood and adulthood, and survivors of the World Trade Center bombing.

She is funded by the National Institute of Mental Health to study the implementation of evidence-based psychotherapies for PTSD in community settings.

  More

Less

Joanna Mack

Joanna Mack is an Honorary Senior Research Fellow in the School of Policy Studies at the University of Bristol and a Visiting Fellow in the Faculty of Social Sciences at the Open University. She was part of the successful bid team and the Open University's lead for the ESRC-funded, inter-university Poverty and Social Exclusion research project, which ran from 2010 to 2015 and was the largest ever research project in the UK into poverty. In 2012, she set up the Poverty and Social Exclusion website - www.poverty.ac.uk - which has become an important source of information on poverty and social exclusion in the UK and is now extensively used by researchers, educators, students and the general public. She is co-author (with Stewart Lansley) of 'Breadline Britain - the rise of mass poverty' (Onewold, 2015) which draws on thirty years of research in this field.

Until January 2016, she was Head of Video and Audio for the university, overseeing the production of teaching materials. She worked, in particular, on a wide range of new modules for the social science faculty covering social policy, psychology, economics, politics and the environment.

After graduating from Cambridge University, she worked on New Society magazine before moving into broadcast television where she had a long and successful career as a producer/director of factual programmes working ofr first London Weekend Television and then running her own production company, Domino Films. During this period, her films and documentaries won many prestigious awards, including from BAFTA, Royal Television Society, British Film Institute, and British Universities Film and Video Council, and, internationally, from New York International Film and Television Festival, Chicago International Film Festival, San Francisco Festival and the CableAce Awards of North America.

She produced and directed the first Breadline Britain series in 1983 and was the series editor for the second series in the 1990s, both broadcast on the ITV network. For the 1983 series she set up the pioneering research survey behind the series which devised a new approach for measuring poverty based on the public's perceptions of necessities. This methodolog,y which she set out in 'Poor Britain' (1985), has been used by researchers and governments in the UK, the European Union and many other countries from Japan to South Africa.

She also produced and directed Lost Children of the Empire, a ground breaking documentary uncovering the story of child migration from the UK under which children as young a three were shipped to Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the former Southern Rhodesia from the turn of the 20th century up until as the late 1960s. The film's broadcast in the UK and Australia, and the subsequent book of the same name, helped secure the foundation of the Child Migrants Trust and their work supporting families separated by these practices. Two decades later it led to official apologies from the Australian and UK governments.

She has written extensively about poverty and inequality, including for The Guardian, The Scotsman and Tribune. She has regularly been interviewed for radio about her work and has presented at a number of festivals including The South Bank Centre and the Edinburgh Book Festival.

Her books include:

Poor Britain (with Stewart Lansley), George Allen & Unwin, 1983.

London at War (with Steve Humphries), Sidgwick & Jackson, 1985.

A Century of Childhood (with Steve Humphries and Robert Perks), Sidgwick & Jackson, 1988.

The Making of Modern London (with Gavin Weightman, Steve Humphries and John Taylor), Ebury Press, 2007.

Breadline Britain: The Rise of Mass Poverty (with Stewart Lansley), Oneworld, 2015.

  More

Less

Joanne Welton

Lecturer in Biomedical Sciences, Cardiff Metropolitan University

Teaching

I teach on the MSc in Biomedical Sciences course from data analysis to medical biochemistry. I also teach on the BMS BSc course.
Research​

I consider my research background as cell biologist and biochemist, with my research interests centering on exploring the potential of extracellular vesicles (EVs), particularly exosomes, as a possible source of biomarkers for disease.

Exosomes are nanometre sized vesicles formed in the endocytic pathway within multivesicular bodies (MVBs). Upon fusion of the MVB with the cell membrane the exosomes contained within are released into the extracellular environment. These exosomes contain proteins, mRNA, miRNA and DNA from the secreting cell and are often enriched with proteins associated with disease, inflammation, and/or cellular stress. This makes them a potential source of multiple biomarkers for diseases, which can be obtained by minimally invasive means (from biofluids such as plasma and urine).

Exosomes as biomarkers for disease (2006-2010; 2013-present)

My most recent work has involved developing methods for the isolation of EVs from biological fluids and standardising their analysis for quality assurance. Once the isolation methodologies were optimised the proteome of these biofluid-derived EVs (plasma, urine and cerebrospinal fluid) were examined using a novel aptamer based protein arrays and analysed in silico through the use of the statistics package R. These methodologies have been used in the context of prostate cancer and multiple sclerosis biomarker discovery pilot studies. These two projects have shown the potential of both novel isolation methods for exosomes and protein analysis have the potential to identify novel disease biomarkers in follow-up studies.

Immunology Research (2011-2013)

Previous research has looked at the phenotype of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and plasma pro-inflammatory cytokines with respect to the acute phase response (APR) of osteoporosis patients and breast cancer patients undergoing aminobisphosphonate (nBP) treatment. We identified that peripheral γδ T cells and Monocytes became rapidly activated and ultimately determines the clinical severity of the APR in nBP naïve osteoporosis patients. The findings of this study may have diagnostic and prognostic implications for patients with and without malignancy as well as relevance for Vγ9/Vδ2 T-cell based immunotherapy. We also undertook a comprehensive meta-analysis of 15 randomized clinical trials patients on adjuvant therapy for breast cancer with zoledronate, identifying a significant overall survival benefit with zoledronate treatment. These new findings supported the call for zoledronate to be considered as a new standard of care in adjuvant breast cancer therapy.

  More

Less

Job Fransen

Lecturer in Skill Acquisition and Motor Control, University of Technology Sydney

I have a PhD in Motor Control and Development where I researched the role motor competence could play in the development of successful sports participation in children. My research interests are in talent identification and development, skill acquisition, motor control and motor development. I'm currently the principal researcher on various projects in talent identification, with a focus on decision-making and perceptual-cognitive skill.

  More

Less

1 2 3 4 
  • Market Data
Close

Welcome to EconoTimes

Sign up for daily updates for the most important
stories unfolding in the global economy.