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Jon Stein

Jon is CEO of Kettera Strategies LLC (formerly named Typhon Access). Kettera Strategies is the operator of Hydra — a platform registered with the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission — that allows qualified investors access to easily invest in a carefully curated array of CTA, FX, and Macro strategies.

Jon has over 25 years of financial industry experience with a focus on portfolio management and managed futures, FX, and commodities’ strategies. Most recently, he was Managing Director at Parker Global Strategies in charge of the construction and development of their FX and CTA products and portfolios. Prior to that, Jon was the CIO and a founding partner of AlphaMetrix Group, leaving at the end of 2007 to join Parker Global. Before that he was the Chief Investment Officer of Efficient Capital Management, a fund-of-funds and manager-of-managers, and Chairman of the firm’s Investment Committee. Prior to his career in finance, Jon worked as a lawyer focusing on hedge fund formation and as the Senior Editor with Futures Magazine from 1987. Jon is the author of Trading Currency Cross Rates, published by John Wiley & Sons in 1993.

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Jonathan J.B. Mijs

Doctoral Candidate in Sociology, Harvard University

Jonathan J. B. Mijs is a PhD candidate in sociology at Harvard University. He is interested in stratification, morality, and the balance of structure/agency in shaping life outcomes. His dissertation is an investigation into how (young) citizens learn about social inequality, and how they come to explain setbacks and success in their own life and that of others. http://www.jonathanmijs.com

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Jonathan Perraton

John's main areas of research focus on macroeconomics, political economy and methodology, with a specific interest in the processes of economic globalisation and their policy consequences. He obtained a PhD in Economics from the University of Nottingham in 1993 and has been a senior lecturer at the University of Sheffield since 2006.

Jonathan graduated from the University of Cambridge in 1985 and obtained a PhD in Economics from the University of Nottingham in 1993. He was then an Economics Research Officer at the Open University on the Globalisation and the Advanced Industrial State project from 1993 to 1995. He was appointed as Baring Fellow in Political Economy at the University of Sheffield in 1995 and then as a Lecturer in Economics since 1999. He was promoted to Senior Lecturer in 2006.

Jonathan is convenor of the Post-Keynesian Economics Study Group, a member of the College of Reviewers for the Canada Research Chairs Program and a member of the Stirling Centre for Economic Methodology. Previously he was also Deputy Director of the Political Economy Research Centre at the University of Sheffield.

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Jonathan Pettitt

I am a Reader in Genetics at the University of Aberdeen. I graduated in Biochemistry from Imperial College London, and received my PhD from the University of Cambridge, after which I carried postdoctoral research at the University of Colorado and the Netherlands Institute of Cancer Research, Amsterdam.

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Jonathan Pugh

Research Fellow, University of Oxford

Jonathan Pugh is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Applied Moral Philosophy on Wellcome Trust Investigator Award in Medical Humanities 'Neurointerventions in Crime Prevention: An Ethical Analysis'. He recently completed a DPhil project at Oxford University entitled, "Autonomy, Rationality and Contemporary Bioethics". His research interests lie primarily in issues concerning personal autonomy in practical ethics, particularly topics pertaining to informed consent. He has also written on the ethics of human embryonic stem cell research, and the use of genetic enhancement technologies.

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Jonathan Robers

Jonathan is Professor in Robotics at Queensland University of Technology (QUT). His main research interest is in the area of Field Robotics and in particular making machines operate autonomously in unstructured environments. He graduated from the University of Southampton, UK, in 1991 with an Honours degree in Aerospace Systems Engineering. Jonathan furthered his interest in computer vision while completing a PhD (1991-1994) at the University of Southampton where he also developed skills in parallel computing.

In 1995 Jonathan joined CSIRO (Australia’s largest government research agency) to develop the area of mining robotics where he worked on numerous large robot machines including 3,500 tonne draglines, 30 tonne underground haul trucks and autonomous underground explosive loading vehicles. His work with his colleagues on the navigation system of semi-autonomous Load-Haul-Dump (LHD) vehicles was commercialised by Caterpillar. He was appointed a Science Leader at CSIRO in the area of Robotics and then went on to lead the Autonomous Systems Laboratory also at CSIRO where he was Research Director.

Jonathan is the co-inventor, and current head judge of the UAV Challenge Outback Rescue, an international flying robot competition in which teams search for a lost bushwalker using autonomous robotic aircraft. In 2013 he and his research team won the Australia and New Zealand Internet Award for Innovation for their Museum Robot project. This project deployed two mobile robots in the National Museum of Australia in Canberra and continues to be used by remote school students to visit the museum with an educator guide, on a weekly basis.

In 2013 Jonathan made international news by being the first person to 3D map the interior of the Leaning Tower of Pisa using his team’s Zebedee 3D laser scanning mobile mapping system. He continues to have an interest in the use of robotics technology for the use in documenting and protecting important cultural heritage sites. His team’s mapping of Fort Lytton in Brisbane in conjunction with Queensland Parks and The University of Queensland was the first Australian heritage site to be archived on CyArk, the international digital cultural heritage database.

At QUT, Jonathan is now developing technology for medical and healthcare robotics and in particular has an interest in the use of robot vision to help with robotic surgery.

Jonathan was President of the Australian Robotics & Automation Association Inc. from 2007-2008, and between 2008 and 2013 was Deputy Research Director of the Australian Research Centre for Aerospace Automation (ARCAA).

Jonathan is also an expert on Star Wars, which he first saw after queueing around the block for tickets with his brother and parents to see the original film in 1977. He has maintained an active interest in all things Star Wars, especially droids, since that time.

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Jonathan Tapson

Jonathan Tapson is the Director of the MARCS Institute for Brain, Behaviour and Development.

His research area is in electronic sensors and systems, and particularly bio-inspired sensors. He has published more than 100 peer-reviewed articles and holds 11 patents.

His research has led to the founding of three spin-out companies, and he remains very interested in start-up entrepreneurship.

His current research activity focuses on networks which can learn to make decisions in the same way that the human brain preforms this task.

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Jonathan Wynn

Jonathan Wynn works at the intersection of urban and cultural sociology. His two major publications are The Tour Guide: Walking and Talking New York (2011, University of Chicago Press, Fieldwork Encounters and Discoveries Series) and Music/City (2015, University of Chicago Press). His work has also been published in City & Community, Qualitative Sociology, Sociological Forum, Cultural Sociology, and Contexts Magazine, and an article in Ethnography called “Hobo to Doormen: The Characters of Qualitative Analysis, Past and Present.”

His forthcoming book, Music/City: Festivals and Culture in Great American Cities, is a comparative, multi-method analysis of three music festivals (the Country Music Association Festival in Nashville, the “Dunkin Donuts” Newport Folk Festival, and the South by Southwest festival in Austin, Texas). The book details the interrelationship between festivals and their cities, marking how they support and exploit each other through these internationally recognized events with rich description and interviews from a wide array of key urban and cultural placemakers. The book culminates with an argument for temporary events as critical to the culture of cities and their communities.
He also working on an Urban Culture primer (co-authored with Andrew Deener) that is under contract with the Oxford University Press.

Jonathan Wynn was recently the co-editor of the ASA Culture Section Newsletter (with Claudio Benzecry and Andrew Deener) between 2011 -2014 and was a regular contributor to Everyday Sociology in 2011-2014. On campus, he serves on the Common Read Book Committee.

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Jonquil Lowe

Lecturer in Personal Finance, The Open University

Also a personal finance practitioner, working with a variety of independent, consumer-facing organisations and financial services providers, including the Money Advice Service, Which? and Royal London, carrying out consultancy, commissioned research, authoring financial capability materials and creating interactive financial capability tools.

Past head of Money Research Group at Consumers' Association/Which? and past editor of research journal, Consumer Policy Review (Blackwell's/Consumers' Association).

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Joseph Ibrahim

Joseph is Head, Health Law and Ageing Research Unit, Department of Forensic Medicine, Monash University Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine and contributes to the research and teaching activities of the Centre of Research Excellence in Patient Safety, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine. Joseph is also an Adjunct Professor, Australian Centre for Evidence Based Aged Care, La Trobe University, Faculty of Health Sciences.

Joseph has extensive clinical experience and continues an active role as a practising Consultant Physician in Geriatric Medicine and is the Clinical Director of the Subacute Services at the Ballarat Health Service.

In the early 2002, Joseph started researching the role of medico-legal death investigations for improving workplace, patient and resident safety and continues with a several projects examining quality of clinical care, quality of aged care, promoting dignity of risk, patient safety and human factors, performance indicators and effects of extreme heat on health in older persons. Currently, Joseph and his team investigating injury prevention for residents living in aged care services. The doctoral candidates with his Unit are investigating preventable deaths from suicide and resident-to-resident aggression; deaths from choking and; barriers to implementing dignity of risk.

He is the current editor of the Residential Aged Care Communiqué, the consultant editor for the Clinical Communiqué and a former regional editor for the International Journal for Quality in Health Care (2000-2004). Joseph continues to publish widely in international peer-reviewed journals and received media attention for research into premature deaths of nursing home residents and promoting risk taking for enhancing quality of life. Joseph has a personal website to promote discussion with the general public on issues we face with a growing ageing population (see web site www.profjoe.com.au).

Joseph has a Fellowship of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians (1994), obtained a Doctorate of Philosophy in Epidemiology and Health Services Research (1999 Monash investigating the relationship between quality of care and performance indicators), Fellowship of the Australian Faculty of Public Health Medicine (2000) and a Graduate Certificate in Higher Education (2001 Monash).

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Joseph Lewnard

PhD candidate, Yale University

Infectious disease modeling; neglected tropical diseases; epidemiology

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Joseph P. Laycock

Joseph P Laycock is an assistant professor of religious studies at Texas State University. He teaches courses on world religions, religion in America, new religious movements, and the intersection of religion and popular culture.

He is the author of several books including Dangerous Games: What the Moral Panic Over Role-Playing Games Says About Play, Religion, and Imagined Worlds (University of California Press, 2015) and The Seer of Bayside: Veronica Lueken and the Struggle to Define Catholicism (Oxford University Press, 2014). He is also a blogger for Religion Dispatches.

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Joseph Savirimuthu

Joseph’s research principally involves analysing regulatory challenges and issues posed by new and emerging communication technologies for traditional approaches to governance. Some of the areas examined include issues such as surveillance, identity theft, child online safety, peer-to-peer file sharing controversies, online dispute resolution and managing personal and corporate identities.Joseph is now exploring the legal, ethical, social and technological challenges posed by autonomous systems and robotics as they relate to aging, healthcare and warfare.

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Josephine Maltby

Josephine is a chartered accountant. She was a senior manager with Ernst & Young, working principally in audit, until 1987, when she became a lecturer in Accounting at the University of Sheffield, leaving in 2008 to take a chair in Accounting and Finance at the University of York. She returned to Sheffield in 2014.

Her work addresses a number of related issues:

Financial Reporting, Governance and Audit

I have written extensively on the closely related development of these three issues, in work on the 19th-century development of the accounting profession and of accounting regulation, and on the governance of UK companies from the early 20th century onwards.

Savings Banks

I am now (with Linda Perriton, York) exploring the use of savings banks (SBs) in the UK c1830 onwards. The SBs were designed explicitly to promote working-class thrift for the long-term: results to date suggest more varied behaviour and, again, significant departures from patriarchal dominance of family finances. See https://voice.adobe.com/a/1edGB for an outline. The 19th century use of SBs by the elite can, I suggest, be linked with 21st century neo-liberal attempts to promote financial 'responsibilisation' via savings. In addition to archival work, I am exploring the relationship between current and historic arguments for the need for individual thrift rather than state support. This is linked with my work on:

Charity and financialisation

The 19th century was a period in which traditional models of charity were challenged. Under the new 'business-like' model, applicants for help were closely monitored to ensure that they were likely to be efficient in their use of it. I plan for work on this (with Janette Rutterford, OU) to form the basis of a more extensive study of the current role of financialisation of the charitable/third sector.

Narrative reporting

This has been a subject of continuing interest for me, involving but not limited to, work on the history of social reporting. Narrative reporting has been a significant feature of financial statements for much of the 20th century, deployed as needed by companies in the face of different crises, and that modern reporting needs to be viewed in this context. Recent work with Abdelrehim (York) and Toms (Leeds) has addressed these issues.

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Joy Becker

Joy conducts a research program in applied ichthyology with a strong focus on fish health research and the pathobiology of infectious diseases. She uses an array of investigative tools from a variety of disciplines, such as epidemiology, immunology, microbiology and physiology to research important aquatic pathogens affecting both aquaculture species and wild fish populations.

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Jualynne Dodson

Professor of Sociology and African American & African Studies, Michigan State University

Jualynne Dodson is Professor in the Department of Sociology and the Graduate Program in African American & African Studies at Michigan State University and the founding Director of the African Atlantic Research Team. She earned the PhD in Sociology from the University of California, Berkeley with a specialization in religion.

Her research agenda focuses on religion and culture of African descendants in the Americas. She has written several articles and books on such topics as Women and Religion, Cuba’s Distinct Religions, the African Diaspora and Religion, Mentoring Racial Ethnic Students, Qualitative Research Methods and the African Diaspora, and many others. Among graduate courses Dodson has taught are “Structural Inequalities: Globalization and the African Diaspora”, “Religion, Culture, and Racial Identity”, and “Cross-Cultural Qualitative Research Methods”.

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Juan Pablo Ferrero

Dr Ferrero holds a PhD on political sociology from the University of Bath. His thesis is entitled 'The Politics of democratisation in post-transition contexts: social movement organisations and trade unions in the production of democratic subjectivities in Argentina and Brazil'.

His latest book was published by Palgrave Macmillan (2014): 'Democracy Against Neoliberalism in Argentina and Brazil: A Move to the Left'. The book examines the complex roots of the left turn in Argentina and Brazil. Originating in the 1990s in a process of mobilization from below against neoliberalism, this turn gained visibility in the 2000s and continues through the present day.

Offering an in-depth analysis of key protagonists, including social movement and trade union organizations, Juan Pablo Ferrero deploys an original analytical model for understanding the nature, meaning, and organizational complexity of the emerging democratic force. Democracy against Neoliberalism in Argentina and Brazil asks us to examine closely what we mean by democracy and offers suggestions for how the left should approach democratic manifestations in order to make radical democracy the center of a renewed political strategy.

He is a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy. He has been awarded a number of grants and prior to his appointment at Bath worked in academic institutions in Buenos Aires and Wellington.

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Julian de Medeiros

PhD Candidate in International Relations, University of Kent

Julian de Medeiros is a PhD candidate and Assistant Lecturer in Politics & IR at the University of Kent. He is Editor and Columnist at 'Independent Turkey'. His writing appears frequently in Open Democracy.

Julian writes about paranoid politicians, (fictitious) conspiracies, and Turkish/Brazilian Politics. He is currently finishing a book (I.B. Tauris 2017) explaining why politicians benefit from conspiracy. The book analyzes the Gezi Protests and argues that, contrary to popular belief, politicians are the real champions of conspiracy theory.

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Julian Meyrick

Dr Julian Meyrick is Strategic Professor Creative Arts at Flinders University.

The son of an English father and Australian mother, Julian studied politics and economics at Exeter University. He took an MA in theatre directing in the US and was later Associate Director and Literary Adviser at Melbourne Theatre Company. He has a PhD in the history of Australian theatre and was a Research Fellow at La Trobe University.

He is a co-editor of Australasian Drama Studies, a member of the Currency House Editorial Board and Artistic Counsel for the State Theatre Company of South Australia. He is a regular media commentator on matters of Australian theatre and Australian cultural policy.

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June Andrews

Professor June Andrews FRCN, author of "Dementia - the One-stop Guide" was Director of the Dementia Services Development Centre (DSDC) in the School of Applied Social Science at the University of Stirling.

The DSDC devised and implemented interventions to drive change in clinician behaviour and health and social care organisations in order to shape and achieve the ambitions of national dementia strategies in the UK and beyond.

She is recognised leader in the world wide movement to improve services for people with dementia and their carers. She received a Founders Award of the British American Project where she is a Fellow, and was awarded the Robert Tiffany Award by the Nursing Standard for her international work.

She has considerable experience in change management in health services, setting up and directing the Centre for Change and Innovation, in the Scottish Executive Health Department, for three years.

She is a former trade union leader, NHS manager and senior civil servant.

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Jungwoo Ryoo

Jungwoo Ryoo is the interim head of the division of business and engineering and an associate professor of Information Sciences and Technology (IST) at the Pennsylvania State University-Altoona. Ryoo is also a graduate/affiliated faculty member of the college of IST at Penn State. He is a technical editor for the IEEE Communications Magazine and also working with IEEE and Software Engineering Institute (SEI) as a consultant. His research interests include information security and assurance, software engineering, and computer networking. He is the author of numerous academic articles and conducts extensive research in software security, network/cyber security, security management (particularly in the government and medical sector) and auditing (especially in cloud computing), software architectures, architecture description languages (ADLs), object-oriented software development, formal methods, and requirements engineering. Many of Ryoo's research projects have been funded by both state and federal government agencies. He also has substantial industry experience in architecting and implementing secure, high-performance software for large-scale network management systems. He received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Kansas in 2005.

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Justin Buchler

Justin Buchler studies elections, political parties and Congress. He has written extensively on the nature of competitive elections and their place in democracy. His 2011 book, Hiring and Firing Public Officials: Rethinking the Purpose of Elections (Oxford University Press), argues that competitive elections are paradoxically unhealthy for democracy because they are not analogous to competitive markets. Rather, they are poor ways of hiring and firing people. Tossing a coin to decide whether or not to fire an employee is a bad way to operate, for a business or a country.

Professor Buchler’s articles on electoral competition include “The Social Sub-optimality of Competitive Elections,” in Public Choice, which won the Gordon Tullock Prize for 2007.

Currently, Professor Buchler’s research addresses the use of spatial theory to study elections, the asymmetric nature of partisan conflict, and the burden it places on journalism.

Professor Buchler currently blogs at theunmutual.blogspot.com

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Justin Leonard

Justin Leonard’s research interests are in bushfire mechanism interaction with infrastructure and the context of bushfire losses including community behaviour and fire fighter safety.

He heads CSIRO’s Bushfire Urban Design team, focusing on the detailed understanding of how infrastructure design and sitting influence it loss potential for various levels of fire arrival severity. Using this knowledge the team then also focuses on effective design and behavioural solutions to address these vulnerabilities.
The work is delivering risk assessment tools and urban design solutions for clients who include:

Bushfires Cooperative Research Centre (CRC)
Attorney Generals Department
Victorian Fire Services Commissioner
New South Wales Rural Fire Service
Victorian Country Fire Authority
Queensland Public Safety Business Agency
Melbourne University
Victorian Building Authority

His experience with experimental science indicates that people living in bushfire prone areas need to first accept the natural occurrence of bushfires, then effectively assess the risk these bushfires present.

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Justin Malbon

Professor of Law, Monash University

Professor Malbon commenced his position at Monash in 2008.

He is an Adjunct Research Fellow of the Australian Centre for Intellectual Property in Agriculture, a Visiting Scholar, Law School, Cambridge University, Visiting Fellow, Wolfson College, Cambridge and a Visiting Fellow, the European University Institute, Florence Italy.

He is a previous Dean of the Griffith University Law School and Director of the Credit and Consumer Law Research Program. He has formerly held the positions of Principal Assistant Parliamentary Counsel, Queensland Office of Parliamentary Counsel; Assistant Divisional Head (Legislation) Division of Aboriginal and Islander Affairs; Research Manager, Blake Dawson Waldron, Melbourne Office; and Senior tutor at the Law School, University of Melbourne.

He also practiced as a Barrister and Solicitor in South Australia for a number of years.

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Justine Bell-James

Lecturer in Law, The University of Queensland

I am a lecturer in law at the TC Beirne School of Law at the University of Queensland, with research interests spanning environmental law, climate change adaptation, and coastal ecosystem protection. I undertook my postdoctoral research with the Global Change Institute at the University of Queensland, focussed on legal issues surrounding sea-level rise and flooding. I work extensively with colleagues from science, and my work has a strong multidisciplinary character.

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