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Clive Church

A graduate of Exeter University, Prof Church’s academic career started as a Teaching Assistant in University College, London and the School of Oriental and African Studies. From 1963-65 he was Junior Lecturer in Modern History in Trinity College, Dublin. From there he went to the University of Lancaster as Lecturer in French History, rising to be Senior Lecturer in European Studies in 1975. Transferring to Kent in 1981 he taught a variety of historical and political courses, including Swiss Studies, first for the School of Languages and then in the School of Politics and International Relations. Promoted Reader in 1988 and Professor in 1992, he was awarded a Jean Monnet Chair in European Integration in 1995. He was the first Director of the Kent Centre for Europe, a Jean Monnet Centre of Excellence, and has been an Emeritus Professor since 2003.

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Clive Hamilton

Professor of Public Ethics, Centre For Applied Philosophy & Public Ethics (CAPPE), Charles Sturt University

Until early 2008 Clive Hamilton was the Executive Director of The Australia Institute, Australia’s leading progressive think tank, which he founded in 1993. Prior to that he taught at the ANU and was a federal public servant. He has held a number of visiting academic positions, including at Sciences Po, Yale University and the University of Oxford. He is currently a member of the Climate Change Authority. In 2009 he was the Australian Greens candidate in the Higgins by-election.

Clive is the author of a number of best-selling books, including Growth Fetish, Affluenza (with Richard Denniss), and Requiem for a Species: Why we resist the truth about climate change. His most recent book is Earthmasters: The dawn of the age of climate engineering (Yale University Press, 2013).

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Colin Murray

Senior Lecturer in Law, Newcastle University

Colin Murray joined Newcastle University's Law School in January 2007 following the completion of his postgraduate research at Durham University. Colin's current research is focused in the fields of constitutional law, national security law, legal history and public law. This work has fed into official consultations on prisoner voting rights, the office of Lord Chancellor, drone strikes, Northern Ireland and "Brexit" and the UK's relationship with Saudi Arabia.

His work concentrates on the concepts of citizenship and allegiance and of their increasing significance in legal discourse. His research concentrates on the concepts of citizenship and allegiance and of their increasing significance in legal discourse. Colin's current project examines the UK Government's use of "Good Citizenship" reasoning to deny prisoners the right to vote. This work has fed into official role as a UK Parliamentary advisor on prisoner voting rights. With Roger Masterman, Colin is co-author of the textbook Exploring Constitutional Law published by Pearson. Colin has published in Public Law, Northern Ireland Law Quarterly, International and Comparative Law Quarterly and the Kings Law Journal amongst others.

Colin is currently working (alongside A. O'Donoghue (Durham), S. de Mars (Newcastle) and B. Warwick (Durham))on the ESRC-supported project “Constitutional Conundrums: Northern Ireland, the European Union and Human Rights".

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Colleen Murrell

Senior Lecturer in Journalism, Monash University

I am just beginning a new job as a senior lecturer in journalism at Monash University in Melbourne, after a lengthy stint at Deakin University.

From October 2015 to January 2016 I was a senior visiting research fellow at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) in the Department of Media and Communications. I worked on projects related to the different editions of The Guardian and the global news agencies' gate-keeping of Syrian UGC.

I teach radio, television and international news. I also research international newsgathering, transnational television and social media. I am the co-secretary of the Journalism Education & Research Association of Australia and have been an occasional contributor to ABC Breakfast TV's newspaper slot.

My book 'Foreign Correspondents and International Newsgathering: The Role of Fixers' was published by Routledge Research (2015). I have a PhD in Media & Comms from the University of Melbourne and a Masters in International Journalism from City University in London.

In my previous career I worked as a reporter, producer and news editor for a number of international news organisations including the BBC, ITN and APTN. I am most active on social media on Twitter as @ivorytowerjourn

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Conor Deane-McKenna

Doctoral Researcher in Cyberwarfare, University of Birmingham

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Costas Milas

Professor of Finance, University of Liverpool

Prof Costas Milas is an expert on Monetary Policy issues (such as interest rate setting behaviour) related to the UK, US and Eurozone economies, respectively. He is also an expert on debt policies pursued by the Eurozone peripheral economies (Greece, Italy, Ireland, Spain and Portugal).

He holds an MSc (Economics and Finance) and a PhD (Economics) degree from Warwick University. He also holds a BSc (Statistics) from the Athens University of Economics and Business. Before joining Liverpool in 2011, he worked for the Universities of Warwick, Sheffield, Brunel, City and Keele.

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Craig Froome

Craig has extensive consulting experience and has undertaken a number of projects looking at renewable energy scenarios, including the preparation of a discussion papers for both government and industry. Most recently, he co-authored The University of Queensland’s latest major energy research paper on Delivering a Competitive Australian Power System.

A member of the University’s Renewable Energy Technical Advisory Committee, he was instrumental in having the 1.22 MW Solar Photovoltaic Array at the St Lucia campus deployed.

Craig is also a member of the School of Economics, Energy Economics and Management Group (EEMG), which focusses on making key solar technologies more affordable.

In conjunction with this group, he worked on the I-Grid Research Cluster with the CSIRO Distributed Energy Flagship to model and quantify the benefits of distributed energy systems while taking into account the costs of deploying and integrating them into the Australian electricity system.

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Craig Longman

Craig D. Longman is a Deputy Director and a Senior Researcher with Jumbunna Indigenous House of Learning (Research Unit) at the University of Technology, Sydney. He is also a practicing Solicitor.

Admitted to the NSW Supreme Court in 2007, Mr Longman has worked extensively in Criminal and Civil Litigation, including in high-profile Human Rights matters such as the defence of Palm Island man Lex Wotton to charges arising from the events on Palm Island in 2004.

Joining Jumbunna in October 2010, his research and advocacy focuses upon the experience of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals in their interactions with the Australian legal system, particularly in the area of Criminal and Coronial Law. He has continued to assist community members in relation to coronial matters, and has prepared and presented on reform in relation to numerous areas of law reform, including Bail, Sentencing, Policing, Legal Aid funding and Native Title.

Recently appointed to the NSW Law Society Indigenous Issues Committee, he also holds directorships with not-for-profit Indigenous advocacy organisations.

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Craig Oneill

Director of the Macquarie Planetary Research Centre/Associate Professor in Geodynamics, Macquarie University

A/Prof. Craig O'Neill is the Director of the Macquarie Planetary Research Centre, and an Associate Professor in geodynamics and planetary science in the Department of Earth and Planetary Science/ARC CCFS CoE at Macquarie University.

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Craig Smith

Research Investigator, University of Michigan

Dr. Craig Smith’s research focuses on children’s social cognitive development and links to social behavior. Examples of specific areas of interest are: children’s developing understanding of distributive and retributive justice, children’s understanding of antisociality, children’s reactions to conflicts and mitigating accounts (apologies, confessions, etc.), influences on children’s money saving and spending behaviors, links between math performance and cognition about fairness, and children’s use of social input as a guide for future thinking.

Craig is currently the director of the Living Lab project at the University of Michigan. The Living Lab is a research/education model that brings developmental research into community settings such as museums and libraries. The UM Living Lab sites currently include the Ann Arbor Hands-On Museum, the UM Museum of Natural History, and the main branch of the Ann Arbor District Library. Since the start of the Living Lab project in 2012, over 6,000 children and families have participated in research in these community settings, and thousands more have had opportunities to converse with researchers studying child development.

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Craig Speelman

I graduated from UWA in 1985 with a Bachelor of Science (Honours) in Psychology, followed by a PhD in Psychology from UWA in 1992. In both degrees I completed research projects in Cognitive Psychology, the study of processes underlying thought. The focus of my PhD project was cognitive skill acquisition, which is my main area of expertise today.

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Cynthia Firey Eakin

Dr. Cynthia Eakin is an Associate Professor of Accounting. She currently serves as the Associate Dean for Academic Programs at the Eberhardt School of Business. She also is the school's Learning Assessment Coordinator.

Dr. Eakin earned a Ph.D. in accounting as well as a Master of Accounting degree with special emphasis in taxation from The Florida State University in 1993. She has over 20 years of teaching experience in all areas of accounting and taxation at both the graduate and undergraduate level. She was an assistant professor at the University of Hawaii's Manoa campus for four years before coming to the Eberhardt School. She has published research in the areas of earnings management, disclosure ethics, and insider trading.

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Cynthia Meyers

Cynthia Meyers studies the advertising industry, past, present and future, and its role in the development of radio/TV and digital media. She also studies the television and radio industry, past, present, and future, and shifting business models.

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Damian Radcliffe

Caroline S. Chambers Professor in Journalism, University of Oregon

Damian Radcliffe is the Carolyn S. Chambers Professor in Journalism at the University of Oregon, an Honorary Research Fellow at Cardiff University’s School of Journalism, Media and Culture Studies, and a Fellow of the Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (RSA).

He is an experienced digital analyst, consultant, journalist, and researcher who has worked in senior and mid-level editorial, research, and policy positions for the past two decades in the UK, Middle East, and now the USA.

A life-long digital intrapaneur, Damian has led new creative and research initiatives at the BBC, Ofcom (the UK Communications Regulator), CSV—a volunteering and social action charity—and Qatar’s Ministry of Information and Communications Technology (ictQATAR).

Damian is a regular contributor to major media outlets such as the BBC, CBS Interactive (ZDNet), and The Huffington Post, as well as a number of other outlets.

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Damien Gleadall-Siddall

PhD Student in Sport, Health and Exercise Science, University of Hull

I am a PhD student and Graduate Teaching Assistant, teaching and researching within the area of exercise physiology. I am broadly conducting research looking at the health benefits of high intensity interval training (HIIT), an increasingly popular type of exercise. I believe exercise is an important part of daily life and can have profound benefits to your health over time.

I work and study at The University of Hull where I am studying for a PhD in Sport, Health and Exercise Science. I also obtained my Master of Science in Sport Science and Bachelor of Science (Hons) in Human Biology at The University of Hull.

My main research interest is attempting to make HIIT accessible to a larger portion of the population by reducing the intensity needed while training, so making this form of exercise easier to complete. While I appreciate this form of training will not be suitable for all, I do believe, a well-designed HIIT programme can be used as part of someone's regular training programme.

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Damien Riggs

Associate Professor in Social Work, Australian Research Council Future Fellow, Flinders University

After completing his PhD, Damien Riggs undertook a three-year ARC-funded postdoctoral fellowship before commencing his role as a lecturer in Social Work at Flinders University. He is currently an Australian Research Council Future Fellow, and an Associate Professor in social work.

Area of Research: Critical kinship studies, Critical race and whiteness studies, Gender and sexuality studies.

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Dana Ruggiero

Dana Ruggiero is a Senior Lecturer in Learning Technology in the School of Education at Bath Spa University. She is involved in research initiatives from various European research institutes including the EU TEMPUS and ERASMUS programs.

Dana completed her Ph.D. in Learning Design and Technology from Purdue University and earned an M.A. in Education from Augsburg College. Her research interest focuses on praxis in design for persuasive technology, multimedia installations, and affective knowledge, including the application of games for social issues such as homelessness, juvenile offenders, children in care, and healthcare. In addition to speaking at international conferences and publishing in peer-reviewed journals she has edited a book on societal effects of persuasive games and is currently writing two other manuscripts around game design and learning.

Currently, Dana is involved in research focusing on player experience in social impact games, Bayesian statistical models to predict behaviour in serious games, and designing games for e-learning in teacher education.

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Daniel Hough

Dan Hough graduated from the University of Newcastle upon Tyne in 1997. On leaving the North-East he headed for the Institute for German Studies at the University of Birmingham to complete his PhD. Following the completion of his doctoral studies in 2000 he spent another two years in Birmingham working on a Leverhulme Trust funded research project with Charlie Jeffery and then as an ESRC Postdoctoral Fellow. He then moved to the University of Nottingham for a year before joining the department in the Autumn of 2003.

In his role as Director of the Sussex Centre for the Study of Corruption (SCSC) Dan regularly works with and advises practitioners in the anti-corruption community.

Dan also serves as the Chairman of the International Association for the Study of German Politics having previously served as both Secretary (2007-10) and Treasurer (2004-07)

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Daniel Neyland

My research interests cover issues of governance, accountability and ethics in forms of science, technology and organization. I draw on ideas from ethnomethodology, science and technology studies (in particular forms of radical and reflexive scepticism, constructivism, Actor-Network Theory and the recent STS turn to markets and other forms of organizing) and my research is ethnographic in orientation. In particular I am interested in the question of how entities (objects, values, relationships, processes and also people) become of the world.

My substantive interests are quite varied. Across a number of research projects I have ethnographically engaged with: security and surveillance, traffic management, waste, airports, biometrics, parking, signposts, malaria vaccines, Universities, algorithms and speeding drivers. Through these projects I have looked into ontology, notions of equivalence, parasitism, the mundane, market failures, problems and solutions, deleting, value and the utility of social science.

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Daniel Rowe

Dan is a third year Ph.D. candidate at the University of Oxford. In his doctoral thesis, ‘Fighting Rust: The Long Economic Crisis and the Rebuilding of the Northeast and Midwest’, Dan explores the political and economic forces that helped transform the Northeast and the Midwest from industrial to post-industrial during the 1970s and 1980s.

Chronicling the efforts that members of the business community, labor unions, community activists and elected officials (local and national) made to help struggling industries and geographic regions negotiate the shifting economic terrain between 1974 and 1988 Dan examines the interlinked histories of urban decline, deindustrialisation, and economic development. By thoroughly examining the political environment of the 1970s and 1980s from a local and regional level Dan hopes to challenge the assumption that the economic success of the 1990s was produced by the limited government and free market policies of the Reagan administration or the ingenuity of individual entrepreneurs.

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Danika Wright

Dr Danika Wright is a Lecturer in the Discipline of Finance and the Honours Program Director at the University of Sydney Business School.

Dr Wright’s expertise is in the design, investment and operations of real estate markets. Her research has contributed to the development of the benchmark house price index used in Australia. She is sought out for her knowledge on real estate prices and modelling, and is a member of the Sirca-RP Data joint research committee.

Her current research projects examine investor behaviour in different settings, including real estate markets, and links to corporate finance.

Prior to appointment at the University of Sydney Business School Dr Wright held quantitative research positions in funds management firms, and continues to provide expert advise to a range of significant industry bodies including the Financial Services Council of Australia and the Reserve Bank of Australia.

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Danny Dorling

Danny Dorling joined the School of Geography and the Environment in September 2013 to take up the Halford Mackinder Professorship in Geography. He was previously a professor of Geography at the University of Sheffield. He has also worked in Newcastle, Bristol, Leeds and New Zealand, went to university in Newcastle upon Tyne, and to school in Oxford.

Much of Danny's work is available open access (see www.dannydorling.org). With a group of colleagues he helped create the website www.worldmapper.org which shows who has most and least in the world. His work concerns issues of housing, health, employment, education, wealth and poverty. His recent books include, co-authored texts The Atlas of the Real World: Mapping the way we live and Bankrupt Britain: An atlas of social change.

Recent sole authored books include, Injustice: Why social inequalities persist in 2010; So you think you know about Britain and Fair Play, both in 2011; in 2012 The No-nonsense Guide to Equality, The Visualization of Social Spatial Structure and The Population of the UK; and in 2013 Unequal Health, The 32 Stops and Population Ten Billion.

Before a career in academia Danny was employed as a play-worker in children's play-schemes and in pre-school education where the underlying rationale was that playing is learning for living. He tries not to forget this. He is an Academician of the Academy of the Learned Societies in the Social Sciences, Honorary President of the Society of Cartographers and a patron of Roadpeace, the national charity for road crash victims.

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Danushka Bollegala

I am Danushka Bollegala, a Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor) at the Department of Computer Science, The University of Liverpool, United Kingdom. See my short vita.

I am also a member of the Institute for Risk and Uncertainty of the University of Liverpool, and Global Research Center for Big Data Mathematics National Institute of Informatics (NII).

My research interests are Artificial Intelligence, Computational Linguistic and Web Mining. I have worked on various topics related to above fields such as measuring semantic and relational similarity from Web data, domain adaptation, sentiment analysis, social media, personal name disambiguation, name alias extraction, and information ordering in multi-document text summarization.

I have published my work in various conferences in Web, AI and NLP fields. See my list of publications. I teach Data Mining in the graduate school.

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Daphne Martschenko

I am a PhD student at the University of Cambridge in the faculty of Education. My current research examines the ways in which behavioural genetics research on intelligence does and could shape how American educators conceptualize intelligence and student success. Specifically, I study how genetics research on IQ and educator understandings of intelligence may engage with the phenomenon of ethnic minority and low income underrepresentation in US gifted education programs.

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Darren Baldwin

Environmental Scientist, La Trobe University

I am a Principal Research Scientist with CSIRO, based at the Murray-Darling Freshwater Research Centre, La Trobe University, Wodonga. I am interested in how natural and human perturbations change the way energy and material move through aquatic ecosystems.

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Daryl Adair

Associate Professor of Sport Management, University of Technology Sydney

Dr Daryl Adair is Associate Professor of Sport Management. He has taught at The Flinders University of South Australia (Adelaide), De Montfort University (Leicester), The University of Queensland (Brisbane), and the University of Canberra (ACT) before joining the University of Technology, Sydney in July 2007. Daryl is on the editorial board of the academic journals Sporting Traditions, Sport in Society, Performance Enhancement and Health, the Journal of Sport History, and the Journal of Sport for Development.

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David Alpher

Adjunct Professor at the School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution, George Mason University

David Alpher, PhD, has spent the past fourteen years applying conflict resolution theory and methodology to practical international development work in fragile and unstable areas. He has twice led field programs in Anbar Province, Iraq; first working to reduce the involvement of youth in the insurgency in 2007 and 08, and then working to peacefully reintegrate Internally Displaced People in the Ramadi district in 2010. In addition he has worked with track two dialogues between conflicting parties in Israel/Palestine, conducted conflict and development assessments in Nepal and Ethiopia, and helped facilitate inter-religious dialogues in the US. Dr. Alpher completed his PhD from the School of Conflict Analysis and Resolution at George Mason University in 2011.

In addition to continuing field work, Dr. Alpher teaches courses on development and conflict, global conflict issues and terrorism at George Mason University. His dissertation, entitled "Developmental Politics: The Minnow and the Leviathan," examined the nature of democratization as an alternative to poverty alleviation as the driving force behind success in international development work. His focus of research is on issues relating to policy and action reform within the development field, development implementation in areas of ongoing conflict, civil-military coordination and complex operations, and on ethnic and religious conflict. He has published scholarly work on the nature of mass violence, as well as writing articles in OpenDemocracy, Politico and Bitterlemons International, among others, on the nature of policy reform within development work, and political stability in Iraq and Israel/Palestine, and has been quoted both domestically and internationally about domestic right-wing extremism in the United States. Dr. Alpher has briefed Congress, non-governmental organizations and a range of offices of the US Government on development and security policy in the Middle East, and speaks frequently at area universities. Dr. Alpher also earned his MS degree from the School of Conflict Analysis and Resolution, focusing on ethnic and religious conflict, and is a BA alumnus of Brandeis University's history department.

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David Arbesú

David Arbesú is Assistant Professor of Spanish at USF, where he teaches courses on Medieval and Golden Age Spain, and Transatlantic Florida Studies. He holds a B.A. and M.A. in English from the University of Oviedo, and a M.A. and Ph.D. in Spanish from the University of Massachusetts Amherst. He has published articles in journals such as Hispanófila, Cervantes, Tirant, Hispanic Journal, La corónica, La perinola, eHumanista, Bulletin of Spanish Studies, or Hispamérica, and is the author of two books: A study and critical edition of Spain’s 14th-century version of Flores y Blancaflor (Crónica de Flores y Blancaflor. Tempe, AZ: MRTS, 2011), and a verse translation of Don Juan Tenorio (Newark, DE: Juan de la Cuesta Hispanic Monographs, 2012). He is also the editor of Spain’s oldest translation of the Bible, the Fazienda de Ultramar (available on-line at www.lafaziendadeultramar.com), and is currently working on two book projects, a study and edition of Pedro Menéndez de Avilés’ conquest of Florida, and a monograph on the Foundational Fictions of Medieval Spain, where he analyzes the stories used throughout the Middle Ages to build the collective identity of Spain.

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David Bell

David Bell is currently Professor of Economics at the University of Stirling, Scotland and the Budget Adviser to the Finance Committee of the Scottish Parliament. He studied economics at the University of Aberdeen and the London School of Economics. After a spell at the University of St Andrews, he joined the University of the Strathlyde, where he wrote his PhD. He joined the Macroeconomic Modeling Bureau at the University of Warwick in the early 1980s, and then was appointed a lecturer in the Department of Political Economy at the University of Glasgow. He joined Stirling in 1990 and since then, his main interests have been in labour economics, fiscal decentralization and the economics of social care. He has published widely and has acted widely as an adviser to policymakers.

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David Blowers

David has extensive experience developing both energy and broader public policy in both Australia and the UK. He has spent the past three years working on energy and earth resources policy for the Victorian State Government, where he recently led the review of the Victorian Energy Efficiency Target scheme.

David has a Bachelor degree in Economics (Hons) from the University of Hull and a Masters degree in Economics of the European Union from the University of Exeter.

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David Cobham

David Cobham is Professor of Economics. His main research area has been UK monetary policy, but he also has substantial research interests in European monetary integration, central bank independence, financial systems and Middle Eastern economies. Most recently he has worked on the issue of monetary policy and asset prices, on the Bank of England's reaction function, on quantitative easing and on the classification of monetary policy frameworks.

He is an active member of the committee of the Money, Macro and Finance Research Group, and Associate Editor of the Review of Middle East Economics and Finance. He has been Houblon-Norman Research Fellow at the Bank of England in 1987, and again in 2001. He was a member of the organising committee of a Norges Bank conference on Inflation Targeting Twenty Years On (June 2009), and member of the organising committee of a conference on 'The Euro Area and the Financial Crisis' , hosted by the National Bank of Slovakia (September 2010).

He organised a conference on 'Monetary policy before, during and after the crisis', sponsored by SIRE and the MMF, at Heriot-Watt University in September 2011. Papers from the conference were published in a special issue of Oxford Economic Papers (April 2013).

He co-edited, with Chris Adam and Ken Mayhew, an issue of the Oxford Review of Economic Policy (spring 2013) on 'The economic record of the Labour government, 1997-2010'.

He organised a conference on 'Monetary analysis and monetary policy frameworks' in Edinburgh in April 2014, papers from which appeared in a special issue of The Manchester School, May 2015.

He organised with Geore Bratsiotis a seminar on 'German macro: how it's different and why that matters' in Heriot-Watt, December 2015 (papers to be published shortly).

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David Cockayne

Senior Lecturer: University of Huddersfield Business School, University of Huddersfield

BA(Hons), MSc (Distinction), PGCHE, FHEA

Senior lecturer at University of Huddersfield Business School specialising in business marketing and brand experience management. Specific research interests include the role of digital technology in marketing innovation, and the organisation of marketing practice. I am also interested in the political economy of sport business management at an international level, with specific interest toward the changing consumer culture in 21st century China.

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David Dunning

His research focuses on the psychology underlying human misbelief. In his most widely-cited work, he showed that people tend to hold flattering opinions of their competence, character, and prospects that cannot be justified from objective evidence—a phenomenon that carries many implications for health, education, the workplace, and economic exchange. He also examines how many of these same processes also injure judgments made by groups.

Dunning’s other research focuses on decision-making in various settings. In work on economic games, he explores how choices commonly presumed to be economic in nature actually hinge more on psychological factors, such as social norms and emotion. In particular, he documents that people trust complete strangers in situations in which the economic analysis would suggest no trust whatsoever.

Finally, Dunning explores how people’s preferences and wishes distort their judgements and conclusions. In past work, he has shown how the influence of motivated reasoning extends even down to shape perceptual experience, such as vision and hearing.

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David E. Clementson

PhD Candidate in the School of Communication, The Ohio State University

David Clementson is a PhD Candidate in the School of Communication at The Ohio State University. He has been published in Presidential Studies Quarterly, the Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Mass Communication and Society, the Journal of Political Marketing, the International Journal of Sport Communication, the Encyclopedia of Deception, and the Encyclopedia of Politics and Social Media. Before grad school he worked professionally for nearly a decade in strategic communication, politics, and public relations. He was a political campaign manager and strategist (for successful Democrats and Republicans), the press secretary and director of communications for state attorneys general, a journalist (for newspapers and magazines), and a public relations director.

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David Eiser

David Eiser is a Research Fellow in Economics at the University of Stirling, and at the Centre on Constitutional Change.

He specialises in the economics of constitutional change, regional economics, and labour markets.

David has published extensively on the economics of devolution in the UK, particularly in regard to fiscal issues in Scotland. He co-edited work on the economics of Scottish independence published by the Scottish Economic Society, and has published a number of papers on inequality in Scotland. David has given evidence to various Scottish Parliament Committees, and published research for the Scottish Government on issues including, the integration of employment and skills services, broadband rollout, and the Commonwealth Games.

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