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Alice de Jonge

Dr Alice de Jonge is a senior lecturer in the department of Business Law and Taxation.

Alice has travelled extensively throughout Asia and speaks Mandarin and Chinese. She lived and studied in Shanghai (Fudan University), and was a visiting scholar at Nanjing University. She has provided written advice for the Central and East European Law Initiative of the American Bar Association, and provided advice in cases before the Refugee Review Tribunal.

Alice was awarded the LawAsia Research Award in 1998, and has also been the recipient of a number of travelling scholarships and research grants.

Alice has also been involved in the design and delivery of a number of AusAid-funded international trade law short-courses aimed at government officials from Vietnam, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia and Burma.

Her research and supervision interests include corporate governance in Asia, cross-border issues of corporate governance in China and Hong Kong, women directors in China and India, Australia-China relations, international law and its applicability to transnational corporations, sovereign bankruptcy, and international law and unequal treaties in international law.

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Allan McCay

Law Teacher, University of Sydney

Allan McCay is an Affiliate Member of the Centre for Agency, Values, and Ethics, at Macquarie University and teaches at the University of Sydney Foundation Program.

He has taught at the law schools of the University of Sydney and the University of New South Wales, and the Business School at the University of Sydney. Allan trained as a solicitor in Scotland and has also practiced in Hong Kong

He completed his PhD at the University of Sydney in 2013 and his thesis considered the ethical and legal merits of behavioural genetics based pleas in mitigation in sentencing. He is interested in free will, philosophy of punishment and the criminal law’s response to neuroscience.

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Allison Anderson

Lecturer in tourism planning and development, CQUniversity Australia

Tropical cities are my research area, especially how many are developing from being the 'supporting act' to the 'main event' for tourists. My research looks particularly at how tropical cities are innovating their urban landscapes to move beyond the traditional huts, colonial-style architecture, beaches and palm trees and emerge as complex and cosmopolitan sites of tourist and resident activity.

I recently submitted my PhD through James Cook University on Urban design and tourism in the tropics. I have worked as a tourism research and development consultant and strategic planner for a number of years, and hold a BSc (Hons) (Geography) from Victoria University of Wellington, NZ (1998).

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Allison Macfarlane

Allison M. Macfarlane is Professor of Science and Technology Policy at George Washington University and Director of the Center for International Science and Technology Policy at the University’s Elliott School of International Affairs. She recently served as Chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission from July, 2012 until December, 2014. As Chairman, Dr. Macfarlane had ultimate responsibility for the safety of all U.S. commercial nuclear reactors, for the regulation of medical radiation and nuclear waste in the U.S., and for representing the U.S. in negotiations with international nuclear regulators. She was nominated by President Obama and confirmed by the Senate. She was the agency’s 15th Chairman, its 3rd woman chair, and the only person with a background in geology to serve on the Commission.

Dr. Macfarlane holds a doctorate in geology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a bachelor's of science degree in geology from the University of Rochester. During her academic career, she held fellowships at Radcliffe College, MIT, Stanford, and Harvard Universities. She has been on the faculty at Georgia Tech in Earth Science and International Affairs and at George Mason University in Environmental Science and Policy.

From 2010 to 2012 she served on the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future, created by the Obama Administration to make recommendations about a national strategy for dealing with the nation's high-level nuclear waste. She has served on National Academy of Sciences panels on nuclear energy and nuclear weapons issues. Dr. Macfarlane has also chaired the Science and Security Board of the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists, the folks who set the “doomsday clock.”

Her research has focused on environmental policy and international security issues associated with nuclear energy. Her expertise is in nuclear waste disposal, nuclear energy, regulatory issues, and science and technology policy. As Chairman of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, she pushed for a more open dialogue with the public, for greater engagement with international nuclear regulators and, following the Fukushima accident, for stricter safety protocols at U.S. nuclear reactors. She also advocated for a more family-friendly workplace. She has spoken on a wide range of topics, from women and science to nuclear policy and regulatory politics.

In 2006, MIT Press published a book she co-edited, Uncertainty Underground: Yucca Mountain and the Nation's High-Level Nuclear Waste, which explored technical issues at the proposed waste disposal facility at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Dr. Macfarlane has published extensively in academia and her work has appeared in Science, Nature, American Scientist, The Bulletin of Atomic Scientists, and Environment Magazine.

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Amalendu Misra

My current preoccupation concerns interrogation of violence in the political process. There are three interrelated intellectual queries I am pursuing while using violence as the abiding theme. The first one examines the Politics of Sexual Violence in Armed Conflicts. The second one evaluates the Role of Violence in the Sacred. And the third one explores ways of Managing Violence in Post-Conflict Societies.

My other subsidiary research interests are: ethno-politics; conservative nationalism; religious radicalism; and peace-building in deeply divided societies.

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Amanda du Preez

Amanda du Preez is Professor in the Department of Visual Arts at the University of Pretoria, where she teaches Visual Culture Studies. She obtained a DPhil in English from the University of South Africa on the topic of cyberfeminism and embodiment in 2003. She has co-edited South African visual culture (2005); edited Taking a hard look: gender and visual culture (2009) and authored Gendered bodies and new technologies: rethinking embodiment in a cyber-era (2009). She served as assistant editor of two accredited journals, Image & Text and De Arte. Currently she serves on the editorial board of Gender Questions, advisory board Persona Studies, the VIAD (UJ) advisory board, and most notably the International Association for Visual Culture. She has a C2 rating from the NRF and received the award as researcher of the year (Arts Cluster) in 2013 and Lecturer of the Year (Humanities) in 2015.

Research focus areas: critical visual culture, feminist theory, gender, embodiment, cyber culture, the sublime, self-portraiture, social media, selfies, place and sense of belonging, digital humanities

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Amanda Lotz

Amanda D. Lotz is professor of Communication Studies and Screen Arts & Cultures at the University of Michigan. She is the author of The Television Will Be Revolutionized (New York University Press, 2014, 2007), Cable Guys: Television and American Masculinities in the 21st Century (New York University Press, 2014), and Redesigning Women: Television After the Network Era (University of Illinois Press, 2006), and editor of Beyond Prime Time: Television Programming in the Post-Network Era (Routledge, 2009). She is co-author, with Timothy Havens, of Understanding Media Industries (Oxford University Press, 2017, 2011) and, with Jonathan Gray, of Television Studies (Polity, 2011).

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Amanda Mergler

Lecturer, Queensland University of Technology

Dr Amanda Mergler is a Lecturer in the School of Cultural and Professional Learning at QUT. As a registered psychologist, Amanda teaches undergraduate and postgraduate students in human development, educational psychology, and behavior management. Amanda has been involved in research projects examining the values of teachers, pre-service teachers and school chaplains. A key interest area for Amanda is the role of ‘personal responsibility’ in the lives of young people, and her recent research in this area builds on her previous work in which she created an education program and survey to assess and enhance this construct in adolescents.

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Amanda Pyman

Amanda is the Head of Department of Management at Deakin University. She has experience in higher education in both Australia and the UK, holding previous appointments at Monash University (MBA Programs Director) and the University of Kent (Deputy Director, MBA Programs).

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Amanda Scardamaglia

Amanda Scardamaglia is a Senior Lecturer and Deputy Department Chair at Swinburne Law School. Her area of research and expertise is intellectual property law, especially trade mark law and its history. Amanda is currently a State Library of Victoria Creative Fellow and author of the book: 'Australian Colonial Trade Mark Law: Narratives in Lawmaking, People and Place'.

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Amanda Weltman

Prof Amanda Weltman is a theoretical physicist who came to the University of Cape Town after earning her PhD in Physics from Columbia University under the supervision of Brian Greene, and working as a postdoctoral Researcher at Stephen Hawking's research group at the Center for Theoretical Cosmology at Cambridge University. Weltman’s research focus is on the fundamental physics that underlies the nature of the Universe. The goals of her research are to study the Universe as a whole, while gaining insight into its origin, composition, structure, evolution and ultimately its fate. Weltman has recently been awarded a SARChI in Physical Cosmology, and is the first woman in the mathematical or physical sciences to win the prestigious award. Weltman has won several prestigious awards including a Next Einstein Fellow award(2015/2016), the South African Institute of Physics Silver Jubilee Medal (2013), the Elsevier Young Scientist Award (2012) and the NSTF-BHP Billiton, TW Kambule Award (2012), the Women in Science award (2009) amongst many others. She is a member of the Cape Town Science Centre Scientific Advisory Board, the South African Royal Society and on the executive of the South African Young Academy of Sciences. “My training and my interests lie in both high energy particle theory and in cosmology,” says Weltman, “and my research is focused on developing bridges between the two.”

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Amir Zarrabi

Urologist and Lecturer, Stellenbosch University

I am a South African Urologist practicing in Cape Town and my private practice is devoted to Urological microsurgery and male infertility.

Infertility microsurgery is a highly specialized field of Urology. I completed my undergraduate MBChB studies at the University of Pretoria and then moved to Cape Town South Africa where I started with training in General Surgery at Groote Schuur Hospital. My ultimate goal was to become a Urologist and I pursued this at the University of Stellenbosch and Tygerberg Hospital. Here I received my postgraduate MMed Urology specialization degree cum laude and received the Rector’s Medal for the best postgraduate student in the Faculty of Health Sciences. I was also admitted to the Fellowship of the College of Urologists of South Africa and received the medal for the best candidate in their final exam (FC Urol SA).

I am currently a certified Urologist, full member of the South African Urology Association and hold specialist registration with the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA).

I received the Golden Cystoscope prize funded by Karl Storz Endoscopes and awarded for postgraduate academic achievements by a young urologist (under 45 years of age) and I have received several previous awards and prizes, including the Bard, the Van Blerk and the Bunny Angorn prizes for the best congress papers presented by a registrar, the Goldschmidt Medal for the best candidate in the College of Urologists examination, the Discovery Foundation award and the University of Stellenbosch Rector’s award for the best MMed student. I am the author or co-author of 12 published papers and have presented 31 papers at congresses.

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Amy Auster

Amy Auster is the Executive Director of the Australian Centre for Financial Studies. A respected economist and commentator, Amy has worked in the banking and finance industry in Australia, Asia, the United States and South America. Previous appointments include senior executive and research roles at ANZ Banking Group, JPMorgan Chase and Merrill Lynch as well as consultancy assignments to the World Bank and Asia Development Bank.

Her research interests include the ongoing development of banking and financial markets across the Asia Pacific region; the opening of China’s economy and its impact on Australia and the region; economic regulation of and funding models for infrastructure development; and most recently the digitisation of banking and finance. She has published numerous papers and provided advice to government assessing the impact of banking and capital account regulation on monetary policy settings and financial flows.

Amy is a member of the Investment Advisory Committee at Australia National University, the Advisory Committee to Deakin University Public Policy Institute and the Australian-American Leadership Dialogue. She holds a bachelor’s degree in journalism and arts from Northwestern University in Chicago and a master’s degree in economic and finance from Columbia University in New York.

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Amy Brown

Associate professor of child public health, Swansea University

Amy's background is in psychology and she now applies psychology to understanding health behaviour and developing behavioural interventions. Amy is particularly interested in infant and maternal health during pregnancy and the first year postpartum and how varied psychological, social and cultural factors can affect decisions and experiences at this time.

Amy specialises in research around how babies are fed; whether they are breast or formula fed, how they are introduced to solid foods and the impact these decisions could have on their long term eating behaviour and weight. Over the last twelve years she has explored how choices made around how babies are fed are rarely simply those suggested by policy as ideal, but instead affected by a multitude of complex factors, often outside the mothers' control.

In particular, her research focusses on why feeding babies is a public health issue, affected heavily by societal and cultural beliefs and behaviours, and therefore why responsibility for feeding should not lie solely with the mother. Interventions to improve infant feeding choices should instead be targeted at wider society.

Her long-term aim is to develop interventions to support new mothers to feel confident, informed and supported in their choices.

Amy's book "Breastfeeding Uncovered' is published in October.

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Amy Maguire

Senior Lecturer in International Law, University of Newcastle

I am a senior lecturer in international law at the University of Newcastle Law School. Since 2005, I have been engaged in research relating to the collective human right to self-determination, with particular focus on Indigenous peoples in Australia and Irish nationalists in the North of Ireland. My doctoral research explores the self-determination claims of peoples who live a contemporary colonial experience, and I argue that the right of self-determination retains a mission of decolonisation in the twenty-first century.

My other research interests include:

- Human rights and climate change adaptation
- Refugee rights
- Indigenous rights under international and domestic law
- Indigenisation of curriculum
- Domestic implementation of international law
- Peace and conflict studies

Please view my research on my SSRN Author page:
http://ssrn.com/author=1688434

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Ana Matran-Fernandez

My latest research focuses on applyting collaborative BCIs to visual search. We have proven that by merging EEG signals from several users we can locate and localise targets within streams of images (both temporally and spatially). This topic relates to several different fields, such as neuropsychology, artificial intelligence and signal processing.

Research interests:
Brain-Computer Interfaces, Collaborative Brain-Computer Interfaces, visual search

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Anastasia Nesvetailova

Dr Anastasia Nesvetailova (MA Manchester, PhD Aberystwyth) joined City in September 2007. Her main research and teaching interests lie in the area of International Political Economy (IPE), finance and financial crises, globalisation and governance.

Her first monograph, Fragile Finance: Debt, Speculation and Crisis in the Age of Global Credit (2007, Palgrave), develops a Minskyan analysis of financial fragility and crises in the late 1990s. Her second monograph, Financial Alchemy in Crisis: The Great Liquidity Illusion (2010, Pluto) focuses on the elusive concept of 'liquidity' in global finance, and specifically, in the global financial crisis of 2007-2009.

Dr Nesvetailova is currently working on the political economy of financial innovation, liquidity and international financial governance.

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Anderson Jeremiah

Lecturer in the department of Politics, Philosophy and Religion, Lancaster University

Anderson Jeremiah holds a Ph.D degree from the Centre for the Study of World Christianity at New College, the University of Edinburgh and is an ordained Anglican Priest. His areas of academic interest include Christian Theology in Asia, Postcolonial Approaches to Theology, Diaspora Christianity, Dalit Studies, Contextual Theologies, History of Christianity, Modern Missionary Movements, Inculturation, Recent trends in World Christianity, Biblical Hermeneutics, Economics and Liberation Theology, Interface between Christianity and other Religions, Inter-Faith Understanding, Religious fundamentalism and Politics, Hinduism and Buddhism, and Religious Studies. His recent research in collaboration with local churches in UK includes: 'Traditions in Conflict: the impact of immigrant-based churches on traditional church bodies in the UK', 'The Changing 'Colour' of World Christianity: understanding the trends in the modern growth and expansion of Christianity'

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Andrea Carson

Lecturer, Media and Politics, School of Social and Political Sciences; Honorary Research Fellow, Centre for Advancing Journalism, University of Melbourne

Dr Andrea Carson completed a PhD on the future of investigative journalism and Australian broadsheet newspapers. She has a Masters in International Politics (UoM) and was a journalist who started her journalism career in newspapers (The Age) before working in radio (ABC 774, RRR), online and television (7.30 Report). She holds a BA in politics and English literature.

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Andrew Biankin

Professor and Regius Chair of Surgery, Director of Translational Research Centre, University of Glasgow

Andrew Biankin is a surgeon-scientist whose research goals are to improve outcomes for individuals with pancreatic cancer through the development of early detection and novel therapeutic strategies based on molecular phenotyping and the delineation and implementation of biomarkers that facilitate clinical decision-making. He contributes to the International Cancer Genome Consortium through extensively characterising the genomic, transcriptomic and epigenomic aberrations in pancreatic cancer, and is extending this knowledge to a personalized model of cancer care, where molecular characteristics guide treatment decisions.

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Andrew Blick

Dr. Blick's main areas of interest are the constitutional future of the UK, the contemporary significance of Magna Carta, the Civil Service, special advisers, and the office of Prime Minister. He uses an historical perspective to asses contemporary issues.

Before his academic appointment Dr Blick had extensive experience working for think tanks, in the UK Parliament and as an administrative assistant at No.10 Downing Street. Dr. Blick has acted as an adviser to democratic reform groups in countries including Ukraine and Turkey; and to the International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance in Stockholm. He has carried out consultancy work for the United Nations Development Programme, European Commission, European Parliament, and UK National Audit Office. Since 2010 he has been research fellow to the first ever parliamentary inquiry into the possibility of introducing a written constitution for the UK, being carried out by the House of Commons Political and Constitutional Reform Committee.

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Andrew Carr

Research Fellow, Strategic and Defence Studies Centre - Australian National University, Co-Editor of the journal Security Challenges , Editor - Centre of Gravity Policy paper series

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Andrew Cumbers

Before moving to Glasgow, I worked at the Universities of Durham, Middlesex and Aberdeen as a researcher, lecturer in economic geography and in economic development.

My research interests include economic geography, urban and regional development, public ownership, economic democracy and employment relations.

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Andrew Dilley

I grew up on the Kent-East Sussex border near Tunbridge Wells. I read for a BA in Modern History between 1997 and 2000, and an M.St in Historical Research in 2000-2001, both at Wadham College, Oxford. After a year out, I studied for my doctorate at the same institution, finishing in 2006. From September 2006 until August 2008 I lectured in Imperial and Commonwealth History at King's College London. I joined Aberdeen as a Lecturer, securing promotion in 2013.

My research and teaching focus on the history of the British empire and particularly the economics, politics, and culture of the Empire-Commonwealth. I have published particularly on London finance and empire, and am now moving to study business trade and empire, supported by an AHRC Early Career Fellowship on 'Commerce and the Commonwealth'.

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Andrew Fagan

Co-Director of Postgraduate Studies, Human Rights Centre, University of Essex

Dr Andrew Fagan (BS.c (Hons.), MA, Ph.D.) has been teaching human rights at Essex since 1998. He has occupied several positions within the Human Rights Centre, including; Deputy Director, Research Director, Director of Academic Studies and is currently Director of Postgraduate Studies.

Andrew has extensive multi-disciplinary teaching experience and interests, spanning the theory and practice of human rights. His research principally focuses upon normative issues in the political philosophy of liberalism and is actively researching in the emerging field of human rights and cultural diversity.

Andrew has taught and lectured upon human rights across the world, including Central Asia, East Asia, Europe, South East Asia and South America. Andrew is actively engaged in supporting the on-going reform process in Myanmar, travelling there regularly to undertake grass-roots capacity building human rights training for groups such as the National League for Democracy and Generation 88 and was one of the very first academics in the world to do so.

In 2013 he was also the very first academic to provide a course of summer school lectures in Kazakhstan. Andrew is an internationally recognised scholar, having published many books and articles, including; Human Rights: Confronting Myths & Misunderstandings (2009) and the Human Rights Atlas (2010). He is currently working on a book entitled Human Rights and Cultural Diversity for Edinburgh University Press.

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Andrew George

Andrew George was appointed Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Education and International) on 1 October 2013. He joined Brunel from Imperial College London where he was Professor of Molecular Immunology and Director of the Graduate School and the School of Professional Development.

Andrew George did his first degree at the University of Cambridge, before going on to the Tenovus Laboratories in the University of Southampton to do his PhD with Professor Freda Stevenson, developing a vaccine for B cell lymphoma. He was awarded a Beit Memorial Fellowship and stayed in Southampton for his first postdoctoral period, before going to Dr David Segal’s laboratory in the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, USA, where he used recombinant techniques to generate novel antibody molecules. In 1992 he returned to the UK as a lecturer at the Royal Postgraduate Medical School, Hammersmith Hospital, which merged with Imperial College in 1997.

Andrew’s research has sought to understand and manipulate the immune system in order to treat disease, in particular to prevent the rejection of transplanted organs. He has also used mathematical models to understand how the immune system functions. In addition to his research, he has been involved in the ethical conduct and regulation of research. He is currently Chair of the UK’s National Research Ethics Advisors’ Panel and is on the Clinical Trials, Biologicals and Vaccines Expert Advisory Group for the Commission of Human Medicines/MHRA. He is a Governor of Richmond Adult Community College and the John Hampden School.

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Andrew Gissimg

Director Enterprise Risk Management, Macquarie University

He is an emergency and risk management expert. Andrew has performed various senior executive roles in the emergency management and social services sectors, including as the Deputy Chief Officer of the Victoria State Emergency Service.

Andrew is an experienced crisis leader having held senior state-wide leadership roles during some of Australia’s most significant natural disasters such as the ‘Pasha Bulka’ Storm (2007), Black Saturday Bushfires (2009), and the Victorian Floods (2010/11). He has been author of state-wide disaster plans, policies and resilience strategies, for which he has received several awards.

Andrews’s significant professional experience is complemented by his academic achievements having completed a Masters of Science (Honours) Degree and a Bachelor of Economics Degree.

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Andrew Hughes

Lecturer, Research School of Management, Australian National University

Andrew Hughes is a lecturer in marketing at the Australian National University in Canberra. Prior to his academic career, Andrew worked in marketing management and strategy for some of Australia’s biggest organisations in the financial, industrial and services marketing sectors. His main areas of research include television advertising, branding, sports marketing, political and non-profit marketing, and marketing strategy. He has published numerous papers in political marketing, advertising and branding, and presented his work at conferences in Australia and overseas.

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Andrew J. Hoffman

Andy Hoffman is the Holcim (US) Professor of Sustainable Enterprise at the University of Michigan, with joint appointments in the Ross School of Business and the School of Natural Resources & Environment. Andy also serves as the Education Director at the Graham Sustainability Institute.

Professor Hoffman has written extensively about corporate responses to climate change; how the interconnected networks of NGOs and corporations influence change processes; and the underlying cultural values that are engaged when these barriers are overcome. His research uses a sociological perspective to understand the cultural and institutional aspects of environmental issues for organizations. In particular, he focuses on the processes by which environmental issues both emerge and evolve as social, political and managerial issues.

He has published twelve books, which have been translated into five languages. His work has been covered in numerous media outlets, including the New York Times, Scientific American, Time, the Wall Street Journal and National Public Radio. He has served on research committees for the National Academies of Science, the Johnson Foundation, the Climate Group, the China Council for International Cooperation on Environment and Development and the Environmental Defense Fund. Prior to academics, Andy worked for the US Environmental Protection Agency (Region 1), Metcalf & Eddy Environmental Consultants, T&T Construction & Design and the Amoco Corporation.

Andy has worked with organizations in both the public and private sectors. This includes projects with: Accenture LLP, Dow Chemical Co., Environmental Defense Fund, Exxon-Mobil Corp., Holcim (US) Inc., International Finance Corp., Novartis, The Conference Board, The Nature Conservancy, The Southern Company, World Business Council on Sustainable Development, and Yellowstone National Park.

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Andrew Jakubowicz

Professor of Sociology, University of Technology Sydney

Andrew Jakubowicz is Professor of Sociology at the University of Technology Sydney. He has an Honours degree in Government from Sydney University and a PhD from UNSW.

Since the early 1970s he has been involved in action research and race relations, and has been centrally involved in the development of materialist theories of cultural diversity. He has taught at universities in the USA, Europe and Asia, and was the foundation director of the Centre for Multicultural Studies at the University of Wollongong. He has published widely on ethnic diversity issues, disability studies and media studies. More recently he has been co-director of the Cosmopolitan Civil Societies Research Key Strength at UTS (2008-2015).

In 1994 he led the research team that produced the book, Racism Ethnicity and the Media (Allen and Unwin), and has has been involved in multimedia documentaries such as Making Multicultural Australia (1999-2004) and The Menorah of Fang Bang Lu (2001-2002). He was historical adviser to the exhibitions on the Jewish communities of Shanghai, at the Sydney Jewish Museum (2001-2002), the National Maritime Museum (2001-2003) and the national travelling exhibition, Crossroads: Shanghai and the Jews of China (2002-2003).

He was foundation chair of the Disability Studies and Research Institute. He chaired the Institute for Cultural Diversity, a national NGO (http://culturaldiversity.net.au) from 2009 to 2012.

He was historical advisor on the SBS series, "Immigration Nation" (2011), and is series advisor on "Once Upon a Time in...", a three season project for Northern Pictures and SBS, of which "Cabramatta" (2012) and "Punchbowl" (2014) have been released. He developed the concept for "The Great Australian Race Riot", a three episode series for SBS made by Essential Media broadcast in 2015.

Graduate research supervision areas include new media and social change, racism and ethnicity, public policy and marginalised minorities. He is current lead Chief Investigator on the ARC Linkage project "Cyber Racism and Community Resilience" with colleagues at Sydney, Western Sydney, Deakin and Monash universities, and in collaboration with the Australian Human Rights commission, VicHealth and the Federation of Ethnic Community Councils of Australia.

"Making Multicultural Australia in the 21st Century", an educational website developed jointly with the Office of the Board of Studies NSW, won the 2005 Best Secondary Educational website category of the annual Excellence in Educational Publishing Awards.

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Andrew King

Climate Extremes Research Fellow, University of Melbourne

I'm a Research Fellow at the University of Melbourne interested in climate extremes and their attribution to human-induced climate change.

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Andrew Linn

Pro-Vice-Chancellor and Dean of Social Sciences and Humanities, University of Westminster

I joined the University of Westminster in February 2016 as Pro Vice-Chancellor and Dean of Social Sciences and Humanities. I am also Professor of Language, History and Society.

My first degree (at Emmanuel College, Cambridge where I was organ scholar) was in English, followed by a Master's degree in General Linguistics and a PhD in the History of Linguistics.

From 2003 I was Professor of the History of Linguistics at the University of Sheffield. In my time at Sheffield I was successively Head of English Language and Linguistics and Director of Research in the Arts and Humanities. I spent the academic year 2007-2008 working at the University of Bergen on a Leverhulme Fellowship, and in 2012 I was visiting professor at the University of Paris 7-Diderot.

I am a Fellow of the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (Det Norske Videnskaps-Akademi) and of the Agder Vitenskapsakademi, a strategic reviewer for the Arts and Humanities Research Council and President of the Henry Sweet Society for the History of Linguistic Ideas.

My current research involves projects and publications on the changing status of English in Europe, language policy-making, the experiences of Nordic emigrants, and the history of applied linguistics.

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Andrew Maynard

Andrew Maynard is a Professor in the School for the Future of Innovation in Society at Arizona State University, and Director of the Risk Innovation Lab. His research and professional activities focus on risk innovation, and the responsible development and use of emerging technologies. He is especially interested in novel approaches to understanding and addressing risk; effective approaches to developing socially responsive, responsible and beneficial technologies; understanding and responding to the increasingly complex couplings between converging technologies and society; and effective science communication and engagement – particularly through social media. Through the ASU Risk Innovation Lab, he is exploring novel ways of understanding, thinking about and acting on risk from an entrepreneurial and innovation perspective. He is interested in understanding how risk as a “threat to value” shapes evolving risk landscapes around emerging technologies – especially where the value under threat is social, cultural and personal – and how creativity and serendipity can reveal new approaches to navigating these landscapes.

Andrew is widely published in the academic press and in public media. His peer review papers stretch from physics and toxicology to risk perception, governance, and policy. He also contributes to a regular column in the journal Nature Nanotechnology (where he writes on emerging ideas and research around nanotechnology and risk), and writes for the column “Edge of Innovation” on the news and commentary website The Conversation. In addition, he directs and produces the YouTube science education channel “Risk Bites”.

Andrew’s science training is in physics – specializing in nanoparticle analysis – and for many years he conducted and led research on aerosol exposure in occupational settings. In the early 2000’s he became increasingly involved in guiding US federal initiatives supporting nanotechnology research and development, and in addressing potential risks. In 2005 he became Chief Science Advisor for the Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies (and later the Synthetic Biology Project) at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and for five years helped inform national and global initiatives addressing the responsible development of nanotechnology. Over this period, he became increasingly interested in science communication and science policy, and began working closely with academics, policy makers, industry, non-government organizations, and journalists, on science-informed decision making. This interest continued between 2010 - 2015 as Director of the University of Michigan Risk Science Center, and Chair of the Environmental Health Sciences Department. In 2015 he joined the faculty of the School for the Future of Innovation in Society at Arizona State University to continue his work and collaborations on socially responsible, responsible and beneficial research and development.

In the course of his work, Andrew has testified before congressional committees, has served on National Academy panels, and has worked closely with organizations such as the World Economic Forum and the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) that promote public-private partnerships. He is currently co-chair of the World Economic Forum Global Agenda Council on Nanotechnology, and on the Board of Trustees of ILSI North America. He is also a member of the National Academies of Science Committee on the Science of Science Communication, and advises the science education/engagement program “I’m a Scientist”. While at the University of Michigan he was involved with the innovative science communication training program RELATE, and continues to serve as an advisor to the initiative. In 2015 he was awarded the Society of Toxicology Public Communication Award.

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Andrew Monaghan

Scientist Research Applications Laboratory in Climate Science & Applications Program, University Corporation for Atmospheric Research

Andrew Monaghan employs computer models to study weather and climate at regional scales, with an emphasis on climate change, and the impacts of climate on human health. He is currently involved in a project to study the influence of climate on human plague transmission Uganda, where factors such as temperature and precipitation play an important role in determining risk. He is also interested in Antarctic climate variability. Monaghan works in NCAR’s Research Applications Laboratory.

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Andrew Norton

I've worked at the Open University since 1992 and am now Professor of Astrophysics Education in the Department of Physical Sciences. I'm a former Vice President of the Royal Astronomical Society and am Editor-in-Chief of the journal Astronomical Review.

My research interests are in various aspects of time domain astrophysics with a current focus on stellar photometry from wide field surveys to investigate close binary stars. I carry out research on all sorts of variable stars, including white dwarfs, neutron stars and black holes, and I edit the International Exoplanet Newsletter. I am co-lead for the materials and learning objects for the PLATO Education and Public Outreach Coordination Office in support of ESA's mission to discover rocky exoplanets in Earth-like orbits around Sun-like stars.

I am passionate about outreach and public engagement - being both a STEMnet ambassador and a public engagement ambassador for the National Coordinating Centre for Public Engagement. I wrote a story book about Exoplanets for young children called "Oogle-Flip and the planet adventure". I also co-wrote the series of "60 second adventures in Astronomy" and am a frequent Academic Consultant for OU/BBC astronomy co-productions,

My Erdos-Bacon-Sabbath number is 13.

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Market-moving news and views, 24 hours a day >

2017-11-23 16:31:32
0m
2017-11-23 16:30:58
0m

November 23 21:00 UTC Released

KRConsumer Sentiment Ind*

Actual

112.3 Bln USD

Forecast

Previous

112.3 Bln USD

November 23 19:00 UTC Released

AREconomic Activity YY*

Actual

955 %

Forecast

-800 %

Previous

1755 %

November 23 23:50 UTC 9494m

JPForeign Bond Investment

Actual

Forecast

Previous

-105 Bln JPY

November 23 23:50 UTC 9494m

JPForeign Invest JP Stock

Actual

Forecast

Previous

182.4 Bln JPY

November 24 00:30 UTC 134134m

JPNikkei Mfg PMI Flash

Actual

Forecast

Previous

52.8 bln $

November 24 09:00 UTC 644644m

DEIfo Business Climate*

Actual

Forecast

116.6 %

Previous

116.7 %

November 24 09:00 UTC 644644m

DEIfo Current Conditions*

Actual

Forecast

125 %

Previous

124.8 %

November 24 09:00 UTC 644644m

DEIfo Expectations*

Actual

Forecast

108.9 %

Previous

109.1 %

November 24 09:00 UTC 644644m

ITIndustrial Orders MM SA

Actual

Forecast

Previous

8.7 %

November 24 09:00 UTC 644644m

ITIndustrial Orders YY NSA

Actual

Forecast

Previous

12.2 %

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