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Tim Kruger

Tim manages an Oxford Martin School programme at the University of Oxford which explores ways of removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

The programme assesses a wide range of proposed techniques to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere to determine which if any of them are technically feasible, environmentally safe and socially acceptable.

He has a broad interest in the potential of proposed geoengineering techniques as a response to climate change, and in the governance issues associated with them.

He has investigated in detail one potential geoengineering technique, that of adding alkalinity to the ocean as a way of enhancing its capacity to act as a carbon sink and to counteract the effects of ocean acidification. He is also interested in how proper governance can ensure that any research in this field is undertaken in a responsible way.

Tim is one of the authors of the Oxford Principles - a set of draft guidelines for the conduct of geoengineering research which have been adopted as policy by the UK Government.

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Tim Lang

Professor of Food Policy, City University London

Tim Lang has been Professor of Food Policy at City University London's Centre for Food Policy since 2002. After a PhD in social psychology at Leeds University, he became a hill farmer in the 1970s which shifted his attention to food policy, where it has been ever since. For years, he's engaged in academic and public research and debate about its direction, locally to globally. His abiding interest is how policy addresses the environment, health, social justice, and citizens. What is a good food system? How is ours measured and measuring up?

He has been a consultant to the World Health Organisation (eg auditing the Global Top 25 Food Companies on food and health), FAO (eg co-chairing the definition of sustainable diets) and UNEP (eg co-writing its 2012 Avoiding Future Famines report). He has been a special advisor to four House of Commons Select Committee inquiries (food standards x 2, globalisation and obesity), and a consultant on food security to the Royal Institute of International Affairs (Chatham House). He was a Commissioner on the UK Government's Sustainable Development Commission (2006-11), reviewing progress on food sustainability. He was on the Council of Food Policy Advisors to the Dept for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs (2008-10), and was appointed to the Mayor of London's Food Board in 2010. He helped launch the 100 World Cities Urban Food Policy Pact in Milan 2015.

He and the Centre for Food Policy at City University London work closely with civil society organisations, through Sustain the UK NGO alliance (which he chaired in the past) and the UK Food Group. He has been a Vice-President of the Chartered Institute of Environmental Health (since 1999) and President of Garden Organic (since 2008). He currently chairs the Food Research Collaboration, an inter-University, inter-disciplinary academic collaboration with UK civil society (www.foodresearch.org.uk), and leads his University's involvement in the 5 University IFSTAL partnership (www.ifstal.ac.uk) which shares food systems thinking for post-graduates in a wide range of disciplines.

He has written and co-written many articles, reports, chapters and books. His most recent books are Food Wars (with Michael Heasman, Routledge, 2015), Unmanageable Consumer (with Yiannis Gabriel, Sage, 2015), Ecological Public Health (with Geof Rayner, Routedge Earthscan, 2012), Food Policy (with D Barling and M Caraher, Oxford University Press, 2009) and the Atlas of Food (with E Millstone, Earthscan 2003/2008). He writes frequently in the media and wrote a monthly column in The Grocer 2000-15.

He was elected Fellow of the Faculty of Public Health in 2001, and Fellow by Distinction in 2014; is an Hon Freeman of the Worshipful Company of Cooks (City of London); and won the Agri-Bagri Award of the Australia-New Zealand AgriFoodNetwork. He rides a bicycle to work, doesn't own a car and grows vegetables and fruit in his London garden.

His current research interests include:
- The political and policy battles over sustainable diets and the meaning of food security;
- Institutional failure to create coherent food policies;
- Food democracy and the growth of democratic experimentalism about the future of food;
- The shape and status of EU, UK and global food policies

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Tim O'Hara

Senior Curator of Marine Invertebrates, Museum Victoria

Dr Timothy O'Hara uses museum collections to answer large-scale questions about the distribution of seafloor animals around the globe. This research includes aspects of biogeography, macroecology, phylogeny, and phylogeography. His taxonomic speciality is the Ophiurodea (brittle-stars), a class of echinoderms that are a dominant component of the seafloor fauna.

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Tim Rayner

Research fellow, Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research, University of East Anglia

From a political science perspective, my research has focused on various aspects of the interface between knowledge and policy, including the role of policy appraisal and evaluation in environmental and climate policy processes. Since 2006 most of my research has been EU-funded, and has centred on the development of European Union climate policy (both mitigation and adaptation), and the UK's role therein. I have co-written various books and book chapters, journal articles, blogs and press articles on related issues. I hold a PhD from the Department of Geography, University of Cambridge.

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Tim Spector

Tim Spector is a Professor of Genetic Epidemiology at Kings College, London & Director of the Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology at St Thomas’ Hospital, London. Professor Spector graduated from St Bartholomew’s Hospital Medical School, London. After working in General Medicine, he completed a MSc in Epidemiology, and his MD thesis at the University of London.

He founded the UK Twins Registry of 11,000 twins in 1993, which is one of the largest collections of genotype and phenotype information on twins worldwide. Its breadth of research has expanded to cover a wide range of common complex traits many of which were previously thought to be mainly due to ageing and environment. He has published over 700 research articles on common diseases and is ranked in the top 1% of world scientists.

He has written several original articles on the heritability of a wide range of diseases and traits including back pain, acne, inflammation, obesity, memory, musical ability and sexuality. He has published widely on obesity, food and nutrition. He also is interested in new areas of biology such as epigenetics and recently our gut microbiome and is director of the British Gut project

He has written several books, He is also author of - The Diet Myth: The real science behind what we eat by W&N 2015 and Identically different: Why you can change your genes, by W&N in 2012 and Your Genes Unzipped in 2003.

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Tim Trudgian

I am a mathematician specialising in number theory, a field of mathematics focussing on the distribution of prime numbers.

I graduated from the ANU in 2005 with BSc (Hons). I won a John Monash Scholarship to Oxford where I completed my DPhil in number theory in 2010.

After two years as a post-doctoral researcher in Canada I returned to Australian as an Australian Research Council Early Career Research Fellow in mathematics.

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Timo Henckel

Timo Henckel is a Lecturer at the Research School of Economics, ANU, and a Research Associate at the Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis. He was previously an adjunct lecturer in the Crawford School of Economics and Government at the ANU. He holds a Ph.D. from the London School of Economics where he has also briefly taught. His research interests are in monetary economics, international macroeconomics, and behavioural macroeconomics.

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Timothy Gould

Lecturer in Physics, Griffith University

Computational quantum physicist interested in hard problems like dispersion forces and strong correlation. Especially interested in the intersection of mathematics, chemistry and physics, and the practical role played by formal theory.

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Timothy J. Jorgensen

Timothy J. Jorgensen is associate professor of Radiation Medicine, and Director of the Health Physics and Radiation Protection Graduate Program, at Georgetown University in Washington DC. His scientific expertise is in radiation biology, cancer epidemiology, and public health. He is board certified in public health by the National Board of Public Health Examiners (NBPHE). He serves on the National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP), he chairs the Georgetown University Radiation Safety Committee, and he is an associate in the Epidemiology Department at the Bloomberg School of Public Health at the Johns Hopkins University. His research interests include the genetic determinants of cellular radiation resistance, and the genes that modify the risk of cancer.

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Tobore Okah-Avae

Tobore O. Okah-avae is a PhD Candidate at Lancaster University Law School. His research focuses on Corporate Governance/Corporate Law issues in Anglo-America. His PhD thesis is on the justice of excessive CEO compensation with a particular focus on British and American company executives.

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Toby Walsh

Toby Walsh is an expert in the study of Artificial Intelligence. He is a Research Leader at Data61 (formerly NICTA) in the Optimisation Research Group where he leads the Algorithmic Decision Theory project. Data61 is Australia's Centre of Excellence for ICT Research. He is also Professor of AI at UNSW. He has been Editor-in-Chief of two of the main journals in AI: the Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research, and AI Communications. He is currently Associate Editor of one of the leading journals in computer science, the Journal of the ACM covering the area of Artificial Intelligence.

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Todd Ely

Principal Investigator on Deep Space Atomic Clock Technology Demonstration Mission, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, NASA

Todd has over 29 years of experience in astrodynamics and space navigation. Since 1999 he has been at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory developing and implementing navigation systems and architectures for many projects - big and small - including the NASA’s Mars Network, the former Constellation Program and Altair lunar lander. His research focuses on new navigation methods, adaptive navigation, nonlinear dynamics, and mean element theory.

Todd is currently the principal investigator for NASA’s Deep Space Atomic Clock mission being developed to advance our capabilities to navigate effectively in deep space.

He is a graduate of Purdue University and is a former Air Force Officer.

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Tom Duncan

Charles Darwin University

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Tom Felle

Tom is a lecturer in New and Digital Journalism at City University London. He is a former career journalist and worked for a decade as a reporter covering politics and as a regional correspondent at the Independent (Dublin); as Bureau Chief of the Leb News Agency (Beirut); and as Deputy Editor of the Irish Echo (Sydney).
He has contributed to a number of books on local newspapers; press regulation; digital journalism; and has co-edited two books on FOI; FOI 10 years on: freedom fighting or lazy journalism (2015, Abramis) and Ireland and the Freedom of Information Act (2015, MUP).

He was appointed by the Irish Government to sit on a national expert committee examining the Freedom of Information Act in Ireland in 2013, and gave evidence to a committee examining the UK's legislation at the House of Commons in 2015.

He continues to write on media issues, contributes to radio regularly and is an active conference speaker.

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Tom Stafford

I study learning and decision making. My main focus is the movement system – the idea being that if we can understand the intelligence of simple actions we will have an excellent handle on intelligence more generally. My research looks at simple decision making, and simple skill learning, using measures of behaviour informed by the computational, robotics and neuroscience work done in the wider group.

Academic website here: http://www.tomstafford.staff.shef.ac.uk/

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Tomas Fitzgerald

Tomas lectures in areas of Advocacy, Legal Philosophy and Intellectual Property and coaches the International Trade Law Moot program. In the past he coached a wide variety of state, national and international moot teams.

Prior to taking up his position with the Law School, Tomas worked as part of the in-house legal team of a multi-national public company for two years. During that time he worked on a diverse range of matters within the areas of Intellectual Property, International Commercial Arbitration, Industrial Relations and Civil Litigation generally.

Tomas holds a BA (majoring in Philosophy and Literature), and an LLB, and has published a number of articles in the area of Intellectual Property and International Trade Law and presented conference papers on Jurisprudence. His research interests include Intellectual Property, Jurisprudence – particularly Natural Law theory – and Feminism.

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Tommaso Faccio

Tommaso is a chartered accountant (ICAS) employed as a lecturer in Accounting. Until July 2014, Tommaso Faccio was a Transfer Pricing Senior Manager in the Deloitte LLP International Tax team and has significant experience advising multinationals on complex international tax issues, particularly in the area of Transfer Pricing and Permanent Establishment, first at Ernst and Young LLP and then at Deloitte LLP.

He is the module convenor of the following modules:

Advanced Financial Reporting
Business Law A
Principles of Taxation
Tax Compliance

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Tracy Langkilde

Professor of Biology and Verne M. Willaman Dean, Eberly College of Science, Penn State
My lab works at the interface of ecology and evolution to understand how an organism's traits are matched to its environment and responds to novel selective pressures imposed by global environmental change, and the consequences of this adaptation. Our research takes an integrative approach, applying behavioral observations, endocrine assays, morphological analysis tools, and molecular approaches to both field and laboratory studies, with a focus on reptiles and amphibians. This work has both basic and applied importance, informing the role of evolutionary processes in assembly and dynamics of natural communities, and our understanding of the resilience and responses of native populations to rapid perturbations caused by global environmental change.

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Tracy Logan

Assistant Professor, University of Canberra
Tracy is a qualified primary school teacher, who has previously lectured to undergraduate pre-service teachers in the discipline of mathematics education. As an early career academic, most of Tracy's research has emerged from involvement in five ARC Discovery grants. Her areas of strength reside within student's spatial reasoning, mathematics assessment and the use of digital tools for mathematics sense making. Tracy's research involves a range of mixed-paradigm research methodologies, including data collection in longitudinal mass-testing situations; one-on-one interviews; cross-country comparisons of students' numeracy development; student and teacher focus groups; longitudinal case studies; and stimulated recall.Her industry involvement has included research projects with the Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) and the World Bank (Indonesia).

Tracy is currently undertaking a PhD at the University of Canberra in the area of mathematics education, with a focus on secondary data analysis utilising a sophisticated framework that analyses both quantitative and qualitative data. Her Master's thesis at Queensland University of Technology was awarded dissertation of the year.

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Trichur Vidyasagar

Professor, Department of Optometry and Vision Sciences and Melbourne Neuroscience Institute, University of Melbourne

Trichur Vidyasagar (called Sagar) is a neuroscientist, with a special interest in vision. He is a professor in the Department of Optometry & Vision Sciences at the University of Melbourne and also an affiliate of the Melbourne Neuroscience Institute.

Sagar first qualified as a medical doctor from the University of Madras. Having already been involved in research into vision and neuroscience during his undergraduate years, he proceeded to do a PhD at the University of Manchester, exploring neuroplasticity in the developing sensory system. He then moved to the Department of Neurobiology at the Max-Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Goettingen. During the 10 years at MPI, he studied the basic neural circuitry underlying visual perception. This work, which has continued when he moved to Australia, first to The Australian National University (John Curtin School of Medical Research and School of Psychology) and then to The University of Melbourne, has led to a new theory of how basic attributes of a visual scene such as lines, colours and movement are coded by the brain. This understanding could help not only in being able to explain many perceptual disturbances but also the development of neural prostheses for the blind.

One of Sagar’s other research areas is the neural basis of visual attention and memory. This work is undertaken in both human subjects at the cognitive level as well as in trained macaques at the cellular level, thus seeking to link our understanding from the cellular to cognitive stages. The work of his team has also helped to elucidate the neural mechanisms that different parts of the brain use to communicate with each other. This research programme has led to insights into the neural processes that enable the brain to search for objects in the cluttered world around us and match our perceptions to stored memories, helping to further understand a number of neurological disorders such as dyslexia, ADHD and schizophrenia. Most notably, Sagar has developed a new theory that describes the neural machinery that we use for reading and identifies a basic aspect of visuo-spatial attention as the underlying reason for the differences in reading performance between good and poor readers.

Sagar has over 75 peer-reviewed publications in neuroscience. Additionally, he has had a life-long interest in the ecological impact of the food we eat and done his own (unpublished) calculations that show how even halving the present meat and dairy consumption in the world could potentially prevent catastrophic global warming due to the reduction in its direct ecological footprint and due to the carbon sequestration from the reforestation of large tracks of current pasture and croplands that were previously woodlands.

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Tristan Derham

Research Associate, ARC Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage (CABAH) Policy Hub – Training and Education, University of Tasmania
My professional career has included business development, hazardous waste policy, lake research, and environmental impact assessment. My academic interests lie in environmental philosophy, ecology and the relationship between people and the environment. I'm a Research Associate at the University of Tasmania, working on policy issues for the ARC Centre of Excellence for Biodiversity and Heritage (CABAH) and undertaking cross disciplinary research between ecology and environmental ethics.

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Tristan Smith

I have three principle fields of research interest: Low Carbon Shipping The development and implementation of technologies and operational practices for the reduction of CO2 emission from shipping. This research area is highly multi-disciplinary, and while my focus is on the development of techno-economic models for the shipping industry and the design of robust and effective policy and instruments for CO2 emission reduction, my research interests cover all aspects of shipping economics, logistics and operation. Marine Renewables Wave, offshore wind and tidal power offer significant potential as low carbon energy supplies of the future. My research interest is in developing and performing hydrodynamic and structural analysis of these devices to establish both their performance and their safety (from a structural integrity perspective). Safety of Damaged Ships and Offshore Structures Ships and offshore structures are designed to withstand structural loads which in accidents can be exceeded. They may then have to survive in a harsh environment before remedial action or recovery to a safe haven can be achieved. This research interest is focused on the development of analysis techniques to assess the survivability of damaged structures in waves - with particular focus on the fluid structure interaction of flooded damaged structures.

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Trygve Ugland

Professor of Politics and International Studies, Bishop's University
Dr. Trygve Ugland was educated at University of Oslo and Queen’s University of Belfast (Ph.D. University of Oslo, 2002). His research and teaching interests lie in the fields of Comparative Politics and Comparative Public Policy, with a focus on European and Scandinavian Politics. His work has appeared, for example, in the journals Journal of Common Market Studies, Journal of Public Policy and Scandinavian Political Studies.

His two most recent books include:
- Jean Monnet and Canada: Early Travels and the Idea of European Unity (2011, University of Toronto Press)
- Policy Learning from Canada: Reforming Scandinavian Immigration and Integration Policies (2018, University of Toronto Press)

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Tyler Case

Assistant Professor, Edwards School of Business, University of Saskatchewan
Tyler Case is a faculty member at the Edwards School of Business in the field of Entrepreneurship with more than a decade of teaching and learning experience. Tyler’s scholarly work explores the development and application of strategic management methods in the areas agribusiness, family enterprise and local venture development. He brings a practitioner’s perspective to his teaching and scholarly work through a lifetime of involvement with his family farm. As a third generation manager and owner of the family business, he is passionate about Western Canadian family enterprise strategy and continuity planning. Tyler has a community focus and engages in the local economy through governance roles, interactive workshop presentations and the consulting of family businesses on the topics of risk analysis and continuity planning. He brings this practice to the classroom by supporting students in experiential learning opportunities that integrate the functional areas through capstone courses in business planning and strategy.

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