Menu

Search

Rossana Ruggeri

Research Fellow in Cosmology, The University of Queensland
I am a Cosmologist studying the properties of the Universe on the largest scales.

By mapping the positions of millions of galaxies, I investigate the unknown physics of the dark energy which drives the evolution of the Universe today, and the physics just after the Big Bang, when the ripples which grew under gravity to become galaxies were created.

I am actively participating in the key experiments designed to understand dark energy and gravity. I am co-chair of the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) lensing working group, and an active member of the Vera Rubin Observatory (LSST) and the Dark Energy Survey (DES). In the past, I had led science with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, one of the major quests of contemporary physics that has spurred advancement in answering a range of fundamental questions about the origins of the universe.

I am passionate about communicating top-level research ideas to audiences outside our immediate academic sub-community. I have experience on a variety of media, including radio, public talks and lectures to local schools, science festivals and amateur astronomy groups, outreach activities at Stargazing Live events, as well as through written pieces.

I am an advocate for making STEM field accessible to everyone. During my career, I took part into different initiatives aiming to reduce structural barriers faced by different minorities in academia and inspire the next generation of STEM careers. I am part of the Women in Science Association with the aim to foster a community for young women in STEM, within and beyond the academic community. I worked and volunteered at N.G.O. centres, in Italy and Australia supporting young students to overcome educational inequality caused by poverty and other conditions.

Since 2021 I am on the Early Career Chapter committee for the Astronomical Society of Australia (ASA) to promote and assist the career development of early and mid-career researchers in the Australian astronomy community. I am also part of the Wellbeing Ambassador program at the University of Queensland, with the aim of contributing to creating a safe and healthy space for staff and students.

I am a Cosmologist studying the properties of the Universe on the largest scales.

By mapping the positions of millions of galaxies, I investigate the unknown physics of the dark energy which drives the evolution of the Universe today, and the physics just after the Big Bang, when the ripples which grew under gravity to become galaxies were created.

I am actively participating in the key experiments designed to understand dark energy and gravity. I am co-chair of the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) lensing working group, and an active member of the Vera Rubin Observatory (LSST) and the Dark Energy Survey (DES). In the past, I had led science with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, one of the major quests of contemporary physics that has spurred advancement in answering a range of fundamental questions about the origins of the universe.

I am passionate about communicating top-level research ideas to audiences outside our immediate academic sub-community. I have experience on a variety of media, including radio, public talks and lectures to local schools, science festivals and amateur astronomy groups, outreach activities at Stargazing Live events, as well as through written pieces.

I am an advocate for making STEM field accessible to everyone. During my career, I took part into different initiatives aiming to reduce structural barriers faced by different minorities in academia and inspire the next generation of STEM careers. I am part of the Women in Science Association with the aim to foster a community for young women in STEM, within and beyond the academic community. I worked and volunteered at N.G.O. centres, in Italy and Australia supporting young students to overcome educational inequality caused by poverty and other conditions.

Since 2021 I am on the Early Career Chapter committee for the Astronomical Society of Australia (ASA) to promote and assist the career development of early and mid-career researchers in the Australian astronomy community. I am also part of the Wellbeing Ambassador program at the University of Queensland, with the aim of contributing to creating a safe and healthy space for staff and students.

  More

Less

Rossella Pulvirenti

Senior lecturer, School of Law, Manchester Metropolitan University
Rossella holds a PhD in human rights law from the University of Nottingham. Also, she has a Master Degree in International Human Rights Law from the University of Nottingham and a quinquennial degree from the University of Catania (Italy). Rossella is currently a senior lecturer at Manchester Metropolitan University (MMU), where she teaches human rights and medical healthcare in addition to international criminal law. Before joining MMU she worked ad lecturer at Liverpool John Moores University, University of Bedfordshire, SOAS and University of Nottingham and as a lawyer in Italy. Rossella has also worked for several international organisations and NGOs, like the European Court of Human Rights (Registry) and the Nottingham and Nottinghamshire Refugee Forum.

  More

Less

Rotem Perach

Lecturer in Psychology, University of Westminster
Dr Rotem Perach is a Lecturer in Psychology at the University of Westminster. He is interested in applied social psychology including topics relating to collective resilience, misinformation, public health messaging, and facemasks. Rotem received his PhD from the University of Kent, and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in Goldsmiths, University of London, University of Sussex, and University of Westminster.

  More

Less

Rounaq Nayak

Lecturer in Sustainable Agri-Food Systems, Bournemouth University
I am passionate about exploring the reciprocal relationship between organizations and local communities, analysing their mutual influence, and studying the sustainability implications. As a human factors specialist and a human geographer, I have worked on projects in agri-food and healthcare sectors, prioritizing a people-centred approach to service improvement. My research interest lies in enhancing the resilience of the global agri-food system to challenges like food poverty, forced labour, and carbon trading by adopting a systems approach. I aim to optimize systems, promote transparency, build community resilience, and evaluate technological innovations using a human factors lens. Through service improvement projects, I have generated reports contributing to sustainable transformations in the agri-food sector and charities

I hold Fellowships with the Royal Society for Public Health, the Royal Geographical Society, and the Higher Education Academy. My educational background includes a BEng in Biotechnology, an MSc in Food Safety and Management, and a PhD in Human Factors and Sustainability. Prior to BU, I have worked as a Research Fellow at the University of Oxford, the NHS, and as an academic at Harper Adams University.

So whether you want to know more about my research or would like to collaborate on a service improvement project, feel free to get in touch.

  More

Less

Rowena Ball

Associate professor, Australian National University

I am an applied mathematician and physical chemist.

Currently I am working on the origin of life in the primordial soup! Another current interest is Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander scientific and engineering heritage.

As an experienced thermodynamicist I am concerned about the widespread misunderstanding of thermodynamics, particularly of the second law and the concept of entropy, among people who are otherwise scientifically literate. If you do not have good working knowledge of the fundamentals of thermodynamics – specifically the Maxwell relations and their Legendre transforms – then it is better not to mention entropy or the second law in your articles, because you will most likely get it hopelessly, even ridiculously, wrong.

Currently in my research I am working collaboratively on new high efficiency systems for separating carbon from fuels and flue gases.

A spinoff is that I have elucidated the oscillatory thermal instability that led to the Bhopal disaster and initiates explosion of peroxide bombs used by terrorists.

My research expertise in reactive thermal runaway and thermal explosions is also motivated by process safety. Serious and fatal thermal runaway incidents are quite common in chemical plants in Asia and in developing nations, although they are rarely reported in the Western press. (E.g, see http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2011-08-19/hyderabad/29904559_1_kalpana-explosion-ketone.)

Most such incidents are preventable, but crucial knowledge that was made good use of by chemical engineers from the 1950s through the 1970s evidently never was learned in some relevant quarters. Ignorance is dangerous.

Recently I came across two papers in the refereed literature claiming to determine thermal runaway criteria for processes used to manufacture two types of explosives, which I read with horror and disbelief.

The authors prescribed operating criteria that they claimed are "safe" from thermal runaway, without carrying out ANY stability analysis. But there is a vicious oscillatory thermal instability in these systems, as an elementary stability analysis shows. Plant operators using their guidelines would be in for a nasty surprise - that is, if they survived. Due to their ignorance these authors' thermal 'safety' criteria are incorrect and dangerous.

This does not reflect well on the journals that published these two papers. Why were the serious shortcomings not picked up by referees?

In general science as fatally (literally) flawed as that in these two papers should not be left unchallenged but where real safety is involved and it puts human lives at risk one is morally obliged to correct it in the refereed literature. Our paper on this may be downloaded at http://arxiv.org/abs/1202.5550, it is published as: Ball, R., Gray, B.F., Thermal instability and runaway criteria: The dangers of disregarding dynamics. Process Safety and Environmental Protection (2012),
http://dx.doi.org/10.10/j.psep.2012.05.008.

On another front, I am researching the role of fire in sequestering CO2.

  More

Less

Rowena Naidoo

Associate Professor in Sport Science, University of KwaZulu-Natal
Rowena Naidoo is an Associate Professor/biokineticist in the Discipline of Biokinetics, Exercise, and Leisure Sciences at the University of KwaZulu-Natal. She is a Developing Research Innovation, Localisation and Leadership (DRILL) fellow of the University of KwaZulu-Natal. In 2020, Prof Naidoo led the development and writing of two international policy briefs specifically on physical activity and health for children and adolescents during COVID-19 and Beyond. She is also a founding executive member of the International Society of Qualitative Research in Sport and Exercise. More recently, Prof Naidoo has been appointed as the Partnerships Director for the International Society for Physical Activity and Health (ISPAH) and as a World Health Organisation (WHO) Physical Activity Consultant.

Prof Naidoo is currently a “Clean Sport Educator”, part of the South African Institute for Drug-Free Sport, and is the recipient of the World Anti-Doping Association Social Science research grant to develop an innovative anti-doping program for adolescents.

  More

Less

Roxanne Dault

Roxanne Dault specializes in patient-oriented research and in knowledge transfer. She coordinates CLARET, a research project that looks at how citizens can give consent to the use of their health data for research purposes. She wants to help improve health care and build a fair and efficient health system where citizens play a central role.

  More

Less

Roxanne Prichard

Professor of Psychology, University of St. Thomas
Prof. J. Roxanne Prichard is a professor of psychology and neuroscience at the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, MN. She studies sleep health in college students as it relates to performance, mental health and retention. Her scholarship has been cited in the New York Times, Scientific American, Wall Street Journal, and The 1A radio program. She served on the NCAA Taskforce for Sleep and Wellbeing and her TEDx talk "Addressing Our Children's Sleep Debt" was featured on the Transforming Education series. She regularly consults with college athletics programs and other organizations to help people harness the power of sleep for improved health and performance.

  More

Less

Roy Judge

Associate Professor (Prosthodontics) Melbourne Dental School, The University of Melbourne
Roy is an Associate Professor at the Melbourne Dental School. His current roles at the school include.

• Head of Prosthodontics
• Director of International

Roy has spoken throughout Australia and overseas in regard to provision of implant dentistry, implant complications and the mechanical properties of bone around implants and teeth. His PhD was related to this research topic and has flowed on to several research projects carried out by graduate diploma, DCD, MPhil, MSc and PhD students.

Roy is the chief investigator for the practice-based research project entitled “Implant Complications in Practice”. This research project has gained support from external societies namely the Australian Prosthodontic Society, The Australian Osseointegration Society and the Australian Periodontal Society. Several papers have been from this research project in national and international peer revived papers.

Roy is the research lead for the new dental implant being developed at the University of Melbourne. Roy maintains a part time specialist referral practice in Moonee Ponds which encompasses all aspects of Prosthodontics.

  More

Less

Roy Maconachie

Professor of Natural Resources and Development, University of Bath
My research in Sub-Saharan Africa explores the social, political and economic aspects of food production and natural resource management, and their relationships to wider societal change. Much of my recent work has been concerned with the politics of natural resource management in West Africa, with a particular focus on the extractive industries, livelihood change and social conflict. My disciplinary background is in human geography, but my work has largely been interdisciplinary in its approach, drawing principally upon anthropology and politics/political economy.

In pursuing my research, I have developed strong international links with a wide range of institutions in Africa, including Fourah Bay College (Sierra Leone), Bayero University Kano (Nigeria) and Makerere University (Uganda). Before joining the International Development Group at Bath, I was a post-doctoral fellow at IDPM, University of Manchester (2007-2009) and IDS Sussex (2005-2007).

Current and recent research themes:
Socio-economic dimensions of small-scale mining in West Africa
Natural resource governance and the extractive industries
Community-based resource management, livelihoods and institution building in post-conflict states
Youth identity politics and rural development in Sub-Saharan Africa
Urban and peri-urban food production and resource management in West Africa
Find out more about my research on natural resources in West Africa here

PhD Supervison

I am interested in supervising PhD students working on topics related to:
The environmental and socio-economic dimensions of artisanal and small-scale mining.
The dynamics of conflict and competition over natural resources in developing countries.
Community based resource management and livelihoods in post conflict states.
I am particularly committed to working with students whose research interests lie in West Africa.

Expertise related to UN Sustainable Development Goals

In 2015, UN member states agreed to 17 global Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure prosperity for all. This person’s work contributes towards the following SDG(s):

  More

Less

Roy Whitaker

Associate Professor of Black Religions and American Religious Diversity, San Diego State University
Dr. Roy Whitaker is an Associate Professor of Black Religions and American Religious Diversity in the Department for the Study of Religion at San Diego State University. After completing a Master of Divinity at Princeton Theological Seminary and Master of Theology at Harvard Divinity School, Dr. Whitaker obtained a Ph.D. in Philosophy of Religion and Theology at Claremont Graduate University.

Dr. Whitaker's research and teaching interests include African American religious studies, world religions, comparative religions, contemporary philosophy of religion, new religious movements, Afrofuturism, religious pluralism, hip hop, Martin Luther King, Jr., and continental and humanist philosophy.

In addition to publishing in peer-reviewed journals such as the "Journal of Contemporary Religion," "Journal of Ecumenical Studies," and "Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought" and interviews appearing in "The San Diego Union-Tribune," Dr. Whitaker serves as a Diversity Liaison for the College of Arts and Letters, Director of the Metropolitan Area Pluralism Study, and Professor of Equity in Education for Student Affairs and Campus Diversity at SDSU.

Dr. Whitaker consults and advises on various topics including race relations, curriculum development, ethics, interfaith dialogue, meaning of life, and diversity, equity, and inclusion. He can be contacted at [email protected].

  More

Less

Ru Xie

Associate Professor in Finance, University of Bath
Ru Xie's main research areas lie in empirical money & banking studies and asset pricing. Recently, she has been working on various research projects in the area of monetary policy and financial uncertainty, including negative interest rate policy, financial crisis and funding & market liquidity risk. She has previously worked at Goethe University Frankfurt and Bangor Business School and has held visiting positions at: Bank of Finland and Goethe University Frankfurt.

  More

Less

Ruan Veldtman

Senior Scientist at SANBI, Stellenbosch University
Ruan Veldtman is a senior scientist at the South African National Biodiversity Institute and a research associate at the department of Conservation Ecology and Entomology at Stellenbosch University. He works in the field of applied biodiversity research, specialising in ecological entomology. His research deals with those entomological aspects linked to services provided by ecosystems and the impact of biological invasions. Other interests include wild silk moth ecology, plant-insect interactions, biological control of plant invasions, pollination ecosystem services and invasive wasp management. He is also a supporter of interdisciplinary exchanges around entomology such as agricultural economics and sustainable agricultural production.

  More

Less

Ruar Elkington

Senior Lecturer in Creative Industries & Chief Investigator at QUT Digital Media Research Centre (DMRC), Queensland University of Technology
For over a decade, Dr Ruari Elkington’s industry engagement and academic research has been driven by questions around how screen content connects with discrete audiences in markets increasingly under pressure through creative and commercial tensions. His screen industry experience centred on the acquisition, marketing and distribution of documentary, feature film and innovative digital content to theatrical and online audiences.

He is a Chief Investigator with QUT’s Digital Media Research Centre and has published in the field of screen distribution, screen studies and education. Ruari is a Fellow, and Associate Fellow (Indigenous) of the Higher Education Academy (HEA) and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts. In 2021 he was nominated and approved by Council as a member of the Australian Institute for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS).

In 2018 Dr Elkington was awarded a Churchill Fellowship to investigate new initiatives connecting Creative Industries students and online video creators in collaborative work. His real-world engagement is evidenced in his 2019 peer reviewed appointment to the World Economic Forum (WEF) Expert Network (Future of Information and Entertainment) building on his 2016 AMP “Tomorrow Maker” award and funding.

Over the last five years external leadership work within the screen sector has also included National Executive Committee Membership (2019) to the Australian Screen Production Education and Research Association (ASPERA), and institutional membership and ongoing student mentorship and screening facilitation for the Australian Academy of Cinema & Television Arts (AACTA) /Australian Film Institute (AFI).

He is currently a Senior Lecturer in Creative Industries at the Queensland University of Technology’s Creative Industries, Education and Social Justice Faculty. QUT is currently ranked as Australia's best young university in the Times Higher Education Young University Rankings and was the world’s first University to establish a Creative Industries faculty in 2001.

  More

Less

Ruby Acquah

Research Fellow, Economics of Trade, University of Sussex
Dr.Acquah is a Research Fellow in Economics of Trade at the University of Sussex

  More

Less

Ruby Ekkel

PhD student in Australian History, Australian National University
Ruby Ekkel is a PhD candidate at Australian National University. Her research focuses on changing attitudes towards and interactions with native animals, especially as mediated by women. After completing a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in history at the University of Melbourne, Ruby achieved a Masters degree in global history at the University of St Andrews. She has published, taught and presented on topics spanning animal history, environmental history, and women's history. She was recently awarded the Ken Inglis Prize by the Australian Historical Studies Journal.

Ruby is an HDR Representative for the Australian Historical Association Executive, and a co-editor of the ANU Historical Journal II. Outside the university setting, she co-edits a podcast about Australian environmental history, The Bush Bash.

  More

Less

Ruby Heard

PhD candidate in energy justice, The University of Melbourne
Ruby holds a bachelor of electrical and electronic engineering from Victoria University and has been working as a consulting engineer for over a decade. Her early career involved working for Arup in both Melbourne and San Francisco.

Ruby is the founding director of Alinga Energy Consulting, a small firm providing energy research, feasibility and design services with a focus on affordable and sustainable off-grid systems which improve livelihoods for Indigenous communities. She is also a member of the steering committee for the First Nations Clean Energy Network, a non-profit working to ensure First Nations participate in, and benefit from the clean energy transition.

Over the years Ruby has contributed to publications on the topics of microbial fuel cells, DC power in buildings and microgrid applications for public transit in the United States. In 2020 Ruby became a PhD candidate with the University of Melbourne. Her research centres on energy justice for remote Indigenous communities and using traditional Indigenous values to augment energy service delivery in Australia.

In 2019 she was awarded as Young Professional Engineer of the Year – Victoria by Engineers Australia and was also featured in their top 100 Engineers Making a Difference list.

  More

Less

Ruby Mendenhall

Associate Professor in Sociology, African American Studies, Urban and Regional Planning and Social Work, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Ruby Mendenhall is an Associate Professor in Sociology, African American Studies, Urban and Regional Planning, and Social Work at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is also an affiliate of the Institute for Genomic Biology and the Institute for Computing in Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences. In 2004, Mendenhall received her Ph.D. in Human Development and Social Policy program from Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois. For her dissertation, Black Women in Gautreaux’s Housing Desegregation Program: The Role of Neighborhoods and Networks in Economic Independence, she used administrative welfare and employment data, census information, and in-depth interviews to examine the long-run effects of placement neighborhood conditions/resources on economic independence.

  More

Less

Ruediger Schack

Professor of mathematics, Royal Holloway University of London
Ruediger Schack is a Professor at the Department of Mathematics at Royal Holloway, University of London. He obtained his Ph.D. in Theoretical Physics at the University of Munich in 1991 and held postdoctoral positions at the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics, the University of Southern California, the University of New Mexico, and Queen Mary and Westfield College before joining Royal Holloway in 1995. His research interests are quantum information theory, quantum cryptography and quantum Bayesianism.

  More

Less

Rufus Rock

Researcher, Institute for Innovation and Public Purpose, UCL
I’m Rufus, an undergraduate history and philosophy of science student at UCL. I’m interested in philosophy of mind, cognitive science and technology. I’ve been incredibly fortunate to work as a research assistant at the UCL Institute for Innovation and Public Purpose (IIPP) under the wonderful Ilan Strauss, Tim O’Reilly and Mariana Mazzucato. At the IIPP, my contributions were largely dedicated to the algorithmic attention rents research project. In three recently released working papers we theorise and empirically demonstrate how big tech platforms are able to exploit their market power by controlling user attention.

  More

Less

Rui Diogo

Associate Professor of Anatomy, Howard University
Rui Diogo is Associate Professor at Howard University and Resource Faculty at the Center for the Advanced Study of Hominid Paleobiology of GWU. He won several prestigious awards and is renown worldwide due to his multidisciplinary approach to address broader questions and societal issues using state-of-the-art empirical data, what some nowadays call "experimental philosophy" or "scientific philosophy". He is the author of more than 100 papers in top journals and about 20 books, including one adopted at medical schools worldwide, "Learning and understanding human anatomy and pathology", and one often listed among the ten best evolutionary books in 2017, "Evolution driven by organismal behavior".

  More

Less

Rui He

Lecturer in Education, Manchester Institute of Education, University of Manchester
Working as a cross-cultural psychologist at Manchester Institute of Education (University of Manchester), my research interests focus broadly on international and intercultural education and cross-cultural and developmental psychology, particularly on international students’ acculturation experiences, bio-ecological development, and (im)mobility; mental health and psychological wellbeing; mundane studies; social connections and interactions; Study Abroad (Exchange) Programmes (Residence/Year Abroad Programme); language, culture, and identity; and creative research methods.

  More

Less

Rui Yuan

Industry PhD Candidate, School of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, University of Adelaide
Rui is an industry PhD candidate at the University of Adelaide. He has a bachelor's degree in telecommunication engineering from the Harbin Institute of Technology and a master's degree in electrical engineering from the University of Melbourn. He works as a research engineer at WattsAS, Denmark.His research interests include modelling power consumers' behaviours, data mining, and smart grid flexibility.

  More

Less

Ruifeng Wang

PhD Student in Supply Chain Management, University of Maryland
Ruifeng (Brett) Wang began the PhD program in Fall 2020. Prior to joining the PhD program, Brett received a Master of Science degree in Global Logistics from Arizona State University. He also holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Management Information System from Shanghai University of Finance and Economics. Previously, Brett worked as an operations specialist with Meritek Electronics Corporation. His primary research interests are digital transformation, technology innovation, and retail operation. Brett has a publication on International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management.

  More

Less

Rungpaka Amy Hackley

Senior Lecturer in Marketing , Birkbeck, University of London
Dr Rungpaka Amy Hackley is Senior Lecturer in Marketing at Birkbeck, University of London. Dr Hackley is a known international authority on Asian perspectives in interpretive consumer research. Her work has generated unique insights into Asian cultures, values and contradictions from a consumer perspective, and also into digital sociology, promotional strategy, media regulation, creative production and marketing ethics in international markets. She is interested in accessing and theorising consumer experience with particular regard to how consumption (of brands, experiences, media) inflects consumers’ senses of identity and meaning.

  More

Less

Ruomin Zhu

PhD student, University of Sydney
PhD in physics at USYD

  More

Less

Rupert Harwood

PhD Candidate, Swansea University
I became ill with a number of systemic autoimmune diseases in 2016 which took until 2021 to get diagnosed and left me with a wish to contribute to efforts to speed-up the diagnostic process and reduce its adverse impact on patients.

I began working as a patient researcher on the Cambridge University lupus and related connective tissue disease studies in 2019 and in 2022 began a part-time PhD in Swansea University Medical School. My study is exploring the role of patient-clinician interactions, and their organisational context, in the sustained misdiagnoses of neuorologically mediated systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

  More

Less

Russell Blackford

I am a philosopher, literary critic, editor, and author, based at the University of Newcastle, Australia.

My recent books include: 50 Voices of Disbelief: Why We Are Atheists (Wiley-Blackwell, 2009; co-edited with Udo Schuklenk), Freedom of Religion and the Secular State (Wiley-Blackwell, 2012), 50 Great Myths About Atheism (Wiley-Blackwell, 2013; co-authored with Udo Schuklenk), Humanity Enhanced: Genetic Choice and the Challenge for Liberal Democracies (MIT Press, 2014), Intelligence Unbound: The Future of Uploaded and Machine Minds (Wiley-Blackwell, 2014; co-edited with Damien Broderick), and The Mystery of Moral Authority (Palgrave Pivot, 2016)..

I'm a prolific essayist and commentator with interests including legal and political philosophy, philosophical bioethics, philosophy of religion, and debates involving visions of the human future.

I am a Fellow with the Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies, a Laureate of the International Academy of Humanism, and Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Evolution and Technology.

I have also had some success as a science fiction and fantasy author, including my fantasy story "The Sword of God" (which won both a Ditmar Award and Aurealis Award in 1997) and an original trilogy written for the Terminator franchise. I've won the William Atheling, Jr., Award for Criticism and Review (in the fantasy and science fiction field) on three occasions, including for my co-authored book Strange Constellations: A History of Australian Science Fiction (Greenwood Press, 1999; co-authored with Van Ikin and Sean McMullen).

  More

Less

Russell Dean Covey

Russell Covey, professor of law, focuses his research on criminal law and procedure. He is the author of numerous articles on topics including the death penalty, police interrogation, crime and popular culture, jury selection, and plea bargaining. As a member of the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, Covey has filed amicus briefs and represented pro bono clients in criminal appeals in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit and the U.S. Supreme Court.

Prior to joining the College of Law, he clerked for Judge Allyne R. Ross of the U.S. District Court, E.D.N.Y., practiced law specializing in criminal and civil litigation at Williams & Connolly in Washington, D.C., and taught law at Whittier Law School in Southern California. Covey teaches courses in domestic and international criminal law and criminal procedure. He received his J.D. at Yale Law School, M.A. at Princeton University and A.B at Amherst College.

  More

Less

Russell Fewster

Lecturer in Performing Arts, University of South Australia
Russell Fewster has directed, written and taught theatre for near 40 years with his work best known in the independent, youth arts and tertiary sectors. He is interested in the healing nature of theatre that addresses societal and health issues. He trained at Ecole Jacques Lecoq and emphasis on physical performance is notable in his work. His stage aesthetic combines projected imagery with live action. He is currently writing, directing and producing an original work based on Christopher Orchard’s paintings for the 2024 Adelaide Fringe, entitled Two of Them.

In 2023 he edited the translation of exiled Iranian Playwright Mammad Aidani ‘s work 'What I said to the Bird' for the 2023 season at La Mamma theatre in Melbourne. His own latest work, 'The Minister for UnAuthorised Arrival's, received a professional playreading in Sydney in early 2023.

Since 2019 and together with colleague Brad West, Russell runs Self@arts a performing arts program delivered to Australian Defence Force personnel undergoing rehabilitation for physical and psychological injuries, in both Darwin and Adelaide. This a short workshop-based program that exposes participants to a variety of theatre based creative expressions and facilitates participants to produce and perform their own original creative work. The aim of program is to broaden and strengthen participants’ self-expression and communication skills, and in doing so enhance mental and emotional well-being. See https://www.unisa.edu.au/unisanews/2019/july/story11/

Other theatre highlights include his adaptation of 'The Glass Rabbit' by Toshiko Takagi – a true story of a survivor of the wartime bombing of Tokyo premiered at the Come Out Festival and toured to Japan (1999). 'Perish The Thought' by Susan Harris Holden Street Theatre a moving stage portrayal of the effects of dementia on family life. (2012). In 2014 he wrote a promenade adaptation of Bram Stoker’s Dracula: 'Nosferatu' which premiered in the Adelaide Cabaret Fringe. In 2015 he directed the opera 'Six Swans' in collaboration with Tutti Arts. In 2018 he wrote and directed 'Earshot' a ballad opera that dramatised the healing nature of WW1 battlefield pilgrimage.

He blends practice with research and has widely published in this area. He lectures in Performing Arts at the University of South Australia.

  More

Less

Russell Q-Y Yong

PhD candidate, Marine Parasitology, The University of Queensland
Dr Russell' Yong is a taxonomist who specialises in parasitic flatworms (trematodes) of fishes, having discovered and described several new species. Russell' is a graduate of The University of Queensland, Australia and currently pursuing a post-doc in North-West University, South Africa under a Senior Postdoctoral Fellowship. He also has a decade's experience identifying freshwater and marine invertebrates while working for an environmental consultancy. Outside of work, he is an avid pursuer of natural history and compulsive iNaturalist user.

  More

Less

Russell Warhurst

Associate Professor in Management, Northumbria University, Newcastle
Russell is an Associate Professor in Management at Northumbria University and Adjunct professor with Aalto University in Finland

Russell is a Chartered Member of the UK Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development and holds a Doctoral degree in Leadership and Professional Development

In addition to University research and teaching, Russell leads on business consultancy projects across a range of organisations from SMEs to MNCs and in the public and not-for-profit sectors

  More

Less

Russell M. Gold

Associate Professor of Law, University of Alabama
Russell Gold is an Associate Professor of Law at the University of Alabama where he teaches courses in criminal law and criminal procedure. He previously taught at NYU Law School and Wake Forest University School of Law. Before he began teaching, Gold practiced law at Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher.

  More

Less

Ruth Dalton

Professor Dalton is an alumna of University College London. As a licensed architect, she has worked for Foster and Partners (London) and Sheppard Robson Corgan Architects (London) and key projects upon which she has worked include the Carré d’Art de Nîmes, in France, the Palaçio de Congresos in Valencia, Spain, and the Kings Cross International Terminal (unbuilt). She has taught at the Architectural Association, London, the Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, USA and the Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL.

Professor Dalton’s research interests are centred around the relationship between the spatial layout of buildings and environments and their effect on how people understand and interact in those spaces. Professor Dalton is an expert in space syntax analysis and is passionately interested in the use of virtual environments as a method for researching human factors in the built environment.

  More

Less

Ruth Duffy

Research Fellow, School of Arts, English and Languages, Queen's University Belfast
Ruth is a historian of medical and oral history. Her expertise lies in modern British and Irish history; the Troubles, medicine, Irish society and culture. She particularly focuses on using oral history as a method to uncover hidden or sensitive histories.
Ruth's first book on the experiences of the Northern Ireland Health Service during the Troubles will be published soon by Liverpool University Press.
Ruth is currently a Research Fellow at QUB working on a project investigating 'mixed marriage' in Ireland. They are actively looking for interviewees for the project. You can find out more here: https://www.qub.ac.uk/sites/acts-of-union/

  More

Less

  251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260   
  • Market Data
Close

Welcome to EconoTimes

Sign up for daily updates for the most important
stories unfolding in the global economy.