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Sarah Eddy

Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences, Florida International University
Dr. Sarah L. Eddy is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences and is part of the STEM Transformation Institute, an educational research center, at Florida International University. They received their B.S. in Biological Sciences from Purdue University and a Ph.D. in Zoology at Oregon State University. Sarah completed a postdoctoral scholarship in biology education at the University of Washington. In addition to their scholarly publications, Sarah’s work has been featured in the New York Times, The Atlantic, Science, and Insight into Diversity.

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Sarah Edwards

Associate Lecturer and Plant Records Officer, University of Oxford
Sarah Edwards is an ethnobotanist and biodiversity informaticist, currently based at the University of Oxford, where she teaches ethnobiology and biological conservation. She is also Plant Records Officer for the University of Oxford Botanic Garden and Arboretum and an Honorary Research Associate at UCL School of Pharmacy, where she was awarded her PhD in 2006. Her career has included working for Kew Gardens developing collections management, nomenclatural and medicinal plant databases. She also provided data consultancies for national and international conservation, environmental and government health agencies, regulators, and NGOs that use plant names.

As an ethnobotanist Sarah’s research interests include understanding how culture mediates people’s interactions and interrelationships with plants. Sarah has investigated medicinal plant use in northeast Brazil and worked in collaboration with First Nations communities in northern Australia, developing digital tools to facilitate intergenerational transmission of traditional plant knowledge. Other research projects have included investigating edaphic and phytochemical factors in the aetiology of equine grass sickness and the scientific evidence base of herbal medicines. Sarah has also collaborated with artists and farmers in South Wales to re-evaluate relationships with ‘weed’ species and worked with the London Borough of Richmond Arts Service as part of the Cultural Reforesting Programme.

Sarah is a Fellow of the Linnean Society and a Board member of the British Herbal Medicine Association (BHMA). She is an author of several publications, including the books ‘Phytopharmacy: An Evidence-Based Guide to Herbal Medicinal Products’ (Wiley 2015) and ‘The Ethnobotanical’ (Kew Publishing/ Quercus Books 2023).

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Sarah Florini

Associate Professor of Film and Media Studies, Arizona State University
Sarah Florini is an Associate Professor of Film and Media Studies in the Department of English and the Associate Director of the Lincoln Center for Applied Ethics at Arizona State University. She holds a doctorate in Communication and Culture from Indiana University. She researches the intersection of race and technology, and her work has appeared in New Media and Society, Critical Studies in Media Communication, Television and New Media, and Transformative Works and Cultures. Her book Beyond Hashtags: Racial Politics and Black Digital Networks is available through NYU Press.

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Sarah Fox

Research Fellow, Department of History, University of Birmingham
I am a social and cultural historian of eighteenth-century Britain specialising in the body, gender, social histories of law and medicine, and inter-personal relationships, and what they can tell us about neighbourhood, society, and nationality. My first book (published April 2022) explored women's experiences of childbirth in the eighteenth-century. My next book looks at the food served in the Georgian royal palaces in the late eighteenth, and early nineteenth centuries - a period when modern ideas of Britishness and British food were being formed.

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Sarah Gador-Whyte

Research Fellow in Biblical and Early Christian Studies, Australian Catholic University

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Sarah Gino

Associate professor, Università del Piemonte Orientale
Sarah Gino is an expert witness of criminalistic sciences and forensic medicine for different law courts in Italy since 1994.

Her scientific research is divided in two main areas. The first one is related to the field of forensic genetics and personal identification. In particular, she is carrying out population studies for forensic applications, analyses involving the identification of biological fluids and tissues in single samples and in mixtures by using immunochromatographic tests and mRNA analysis, and DNA extraction from unusual tissues. Furthermore, she is currently starting some collaborative studies on the application of the microbiome analysis in forensic fields, and the application of SNP panel for personal identification.

Another line of research is related with the role of the forensic medicine and the forensic genetics for the management of the victims of gender violence, such as sexual abuse and maltreatment.

RESEARCH CONTRIBUTIONS
http://tinyurl.com/SarahGINO-pubs

COMPLETE CV
https://upobook.uniupo.it/personale/cv/1718/1/Cv.GINO.Sarah.Eng.pdf

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Sarah Golightley

Lecturer, Social Work, University of Strathclyde
My research, teaching, and social work practice have focused on supporting people who have experienced violence. I am passionate about uplifting the perspectives of service users/survivors. I am especially interested in Disability Studies, Mad Studies, and feminist research methods. My current research focus is on institutional violence and the pathologisation of youth in the USA 'troubled teen industry'. For my PhD, I conducted in-depth interviews and surveys on the experiences of former therapeutic boarding school students. Prior to moving into academia, I was a social worker who specialised in supporting LGBTQ+ victims/survivors of domestic abuse and LGBTQ+ homeless youth.

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Sarah Goodrum

Senior Research Associate, Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence, University of Colorado Boulder
Sarah Goodrum is a Senior Research Associate in Violence Prevention with the Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence at the University of Colorado Boulder. Formerly, she served as an A.M. and Jo Winchester Distinguished Professor and Department Chair in Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Northern Colorado and as Associate Professor and Department Chair in Anthropology and Sociology at Centre College. Dr. Goodrum’s research focuses on violence prevention, homicide victimization, domestic violence, and the criminal justice system. Her co-authored Report on the Arapahoe High School Shooting, funded by The Denver Foundation, examined the lessons learned on violence prevention in schools. These lessons have been used to improve the violence prevention strategies for threat assessment, information sharing, and leadership in school settings. Recently, Dr. Goodrum extended this work on violence prevention to co-author the Colorado School Safety Guide for the Colorado Attorney General’s Office and serve as co-PI on an evaluation of the training for the Colorado Threat Assessment and Management Protocol in partnership with the Colorado School Safety Resource Center. She is currently a PI and co-PI on several violence prevention projects funded by the U.S. Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Assistance, Department of Homeland Security, and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Dr. Goodrum’s publications have appeared in the Journal of Threat Assessment and Management, Behavioral Sciences & the Law, Law & Social Inquiry, Sociology of Education, Symbolic Interaction, Sociological Spectrum, Sociological Focus, Criminal Justice Review, and International Journal of Social Research Methodology: Theory & Practice. Her book After Homicide: Victims’ Families in the Criminal Justice System chronicles the experiences of families of murder victims from death notification to the trial, is available through Lynne Rienner Publishers (2019).

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Sarah Gordon

Associate Professor in Psychology, University of Otago
My recent research has focused on two themes: reducing discrimination associated with mental illness among medical students and the Police, and promoting recovery-focused services and resources – in line with the recent major reorientation of service delivery models in mental health in New Zealand and internationally.

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Sarah Gray

Senior Research Officer, Murdoch Children's Research Institute
Dr Sarah Gray is a Child Psychologist and Researcher, currently working within the Centre for Community Child Health at the Murdoch Children's Research Institute. In her current role as Project Manager of the Changing Children's Chances project, Sarah works in collaboration with policy makers to identify potential policy-sensitive pathways in early childhood to reduce inequities in children’s health, development and wellbeing. This project applies robust causal analytic methods to powerful nationally-representative existing data sources (e.g. the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children, the Australian Early Development Census, and the Person Level Integrated Data Asset). Sarah is interested in building the capacity for large-scale administrative and cohort data to improve our understanding of policy impact and drive more precise policy decision making to reduce inequities for Australia's children.

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Sarah Guthery

Assistant Professor of Curriculum and Instruction, Texas A&M University-Commerce
Sarah Guthery is an assistant professor in Curriculum and Instruction at Texas A&M University-Commerce. Her research focuses on the influence of educational policy and the educator labor market. She primarily investigates the production, retention and promotion of teachers and principals. She currently teaches undergraduate and graduate classes leading to teacher certification and educational leadership. She earned her Ph.D. from Southern Methodist University with an emphasis in educational quantitative research. She has served on Texas State advisory boards for educator preparation data and educator preparation assessment.

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Sarah Haggarty

Associate Professor in English, University of Cambridge, and Fellow and Director of Studies in English, Queens' College, University of Cambridge
Sarah is an Associate Professor at the Faculty of English. She is also Director of Studies in English, Lecturer, and Fellow at Queens’ College, Cambridge.

Sarah works on long-eighteenth-century British writing, visual art, and culture, and has a special interest in the intersections of literary and cultural studies, philosophy, theology, and anthropology. She has written about theories of gift-giving and exchange; phenomenologies of timing and tempo; practical geometry, line-drawing and know-how; and folds as idea and practice in letter-writing. Sarah is also an expert in the study of William Blake, having most recently contributed an essay to the exhibition catalogue for William Blake’s Universe, held in Spring 2024 at the Fitzwilliam Museum and Summer 2024 at the Hamburger Kunsthalle.

Sarah went to her local comprehensive school before reading English at Cambridge. She was appointed to a Junior Research Fellowship at Oxford, and lectureships at Southampton and Newcastle, before taking up her current post.

Sarah has variously authored, co-authored, edited, and co-edited four books about William Blake, including her first monograph, Blake’s Gifts: Poetry and the Politics of Exchange (CUP, 2010) and William Blake in Context (CUP, 2019). In 2017-18, she held a Leverhulme Trust Research Fellowship, and in 2016-17, she was an Early Career Fellow and the Crausaz-Wordsworth Fellow in Philosophy at CRASSH, the Centre for Research in Arts, Social Sciences, and Humanities. She is currently on sabbatical, finishing a book about present time and kairos in Romantic-period British writing and visual culture. This includes chapters on Young’s Night Thoughts and its illustrators; spiritual autobiographies by Equiano, Whitefield, and John Newton; revolutionary writing by Helen Maria Williams; poems by Smith and Barbauld; love letters by Richardson, Chesterfield, Piozzi, Judith Madan, Wollstonecraft, Keats, and Austen; and periodical writing by Hazlitt and Hunt.

Sarah teaches a Faculty MPhil Specialist Seminar related to her current research, and offers undergraduate lecture courses on ‘things’ and material culture; travel, trade and empire; love-letters; and theories and practices of line-drawing, among other topics, for the Visual Culture (II.18), Love, Gender and Sexuality (II.9), Long-Eighteenth Century (IB.6) and Practical Criticism (IA.1) papers. At Queens’, she teaches Practical Criticism and Critical Practice from Plato to the present, and long-eighteenth century writing (IB.6, II.9). She also acts as Director of Studies (academic tutor) for Queens’ English Finalists, and participates in undergraduate admissions. At Cambridge and previously, Sarah has won or been nominated for student-led teaching awards for outstanding lecturing, outstanding feedback, and contributions to pastoral care.

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Sarah Halligan

Professor of Child and Family Mental Health, University of Bath
Sarah Halligan is Professor of Child and Family Mental Health at the University of Bath. Her research has examined the development of psychological disorders, particularly posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression, with a focus on young people. In the PTSD field Prof Halligan has examined the cognitive-behavioural, biological and social factors that contribute to disorder following trauma exposure; and has studied both national and international populations. Prof Halligan’s research has been funded by funding bodies including the ESRC, MRC, British Academy, Nuffield Foundation, NIHR, Wellcome Trust, and the Royal Society.

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Sarah Hartley

Research Fellow, Sociology and Social Policy, University of Nottingham

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Sarah Hayford

Sarah Hayford

Professor of Sociology; Director, Institute for Population Research, The Ohio State University
I study family formation, childbearing, and reproductive health. I am particularly interested in how people make decisions about having children and who is able to carry out their plans. My research has been funded by internal university grants, private foundations, and the National Institutes of Health.

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Sarah Hook

Senior Lecturer in Law, Western Sydney University
Researching at the intersections of law and literary theory, Dr Hook's research centres on authors and artists and creative freedom. Her research looks at romanticism, postmodernism, and contemporary modes of textual production and how these ideologies intersect with legal contexts such as moral rights, defamation, copyright, regulation of the press, and other impediments to the free exchange of ideas and expression. Her current book on Moral Rights is available from Routledge. Dr Hook is a Senior lecturer in Intellectual Property Law and Media Law at Western Sydney University.

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Sarah Inskip

Future Leaders Fellow in the School of Archaeology and Ancient History, University of Leicester
Sarah Inskip has a PhD in Bioarchaeology and is a bioarchaeologist whose research centres around the interdisciplinary analysis of archaeological human remains. Her research areas focus on tracing the long term impact of changing human behaviour and social practices on health. At present, she is the PI of the UKRI-AHRC funded 'Tobacco, Health and History' Project taking place in the School of Archaeology and Ancient History at the University of Leicester. Sarah also has a strong research interest in the origin and spread of Leprosy, and has published widely on the genetic analysis of the causative bacteria in ancient remains.

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Sarah Jefferson

Lecturer in Education, Edith Cowan University
Sarah is a highly experienced secondary educator who has held extensive school based teaching and leadership positions in both the United Kingdom and Australia. Her PhD focused on identifying positive veteran teachers and examining the role of social support in sustaining their commitment to teaching.

Sarah has worked with government agencies and curriculum authorities advising on policy and curriculum development in a diverse range of fields, including social support, inclusion and funding models.

Sarah is also engaged with research examining the role of public value in relation to education. Most recently, Sarah has become a Scholar at the Not-for-profit UWA Research Group which fosters interdisciplinary research, collaboration and engagement with the not for profit sector.

Professional associations:

ACSSO - Australian Council of State School Organisations (2018-2022 Director)
Diverse Women in Leadership
Golden Key International Honour Society
TRBWA - Teachers Registration Board of Western Australia
Not-for-profits University of Western Australia Research Group – Scholar

Research areas and interests:

Not-for-profit and education
Social support and well-being
Teacher well-being
Long term and later career teachers
Diversity and inclusion in education
Educational policy design and implementation

Qualifications:
Doctor of Philosophy, Edith Cowan University, 2020.
Graduate Diploma in Education, The University of Western Australia, 1997.
Bachelor of Arts, The University of Western Australia, 1996.

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Sarah Jelbert

Lecturer in Psychology, University of Bristol
I am a Lecturer in Psychological Science at the University of Bristol, where I teach a popular course on the Science of Happiness and run interventions to improve student well-being. I am also a lecturer and researcher in animal cognition, running comparative studies to explore the evolution of intelligence.

I am broadly interested in the evolution of cognitive abilities in humans and non-human animals. Over the past decade I have studied the cognitive abilities of a range of animals, including Eurasian jays, rufous hummingbirds, Goffin cockatoos, and both human children and adults. The majority of my work has focussed on the New Caledonian crow, a remarkable species of bird which manufactures complex tools in the wild and performs exceptionally well on cognitive tasks in captivity.

In addition, since joining the University of Bristol in 2019, I have transitioned towards applied psychological research. This is a move I made largely in response to the student mental health crisis and a desire to tackle well-being concerns among young adults. Here, I am investigating the effects of positive psychology interventions on student well-being, delivered as part of the teaching curriculum.

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Sarah Kaine

Dr Sarah Kaine lectures in HRM and IR in the UTS Business School. Her research focuses on several broad themes: employee representation, the development and exercise of employee voice, the formal and informal regulation of employment relations and HRM and sustainability. Specifically Sarah is interested in innovation in employment regulation – beyond the bounds of traditional labour law, Corporate Social Responsibility and its link to industrial relations and the role of leadership in promoting sustainability and CSR. Prior to becoming an academic Sarah worked as an industrial relations practitioner and a consultant to not-for-profit organisations.

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Sarah Kerr

Lecturer in Archaeology and Radical Humanities, University College Cork
I am originally from Bangor, Co Down and studied at Queen's University Belfast (BSc (Hons) Geography, Archaeology-Palaeoecology, MSc Professional Archaeology, and PhD Archaeology). I completed postdoctoral fellowships at KU Leuven (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium, funded by the Department of Foreign Affairs) and Trinity College Dublin (Ireland, funded by TCD) before I started teaching archaeology and heritage studies at The University of Sheffield (UK). I held a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions Fellowship at Aarhus University (Denmark) before joining UCC in September 2023 as lecturer in Radical Humanities and Archaeology.

As a buildings archaeologist, I am interested primarily in the built environment of medieval Europe and have written about English lodging ranges, castles and great houses, and Irish tower houses and round towers. I am interested in how buildings were the products of social norms and expectations and how, in return, they were agents that shaped everyday life. I am equally interested in the role of historic buildings in our contemporary society and have explored the impacts of climate change on our built heritage in Ireland, Scotland and Denmark. I have written and published on the important role heritage has in climate communication and climate action, and I continue to work on the topic in West Cork.

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Sarah Lacy

Assistant Professor of Anthropology, University of Delaware
Sarah A. Lacy is a biological anthropologist specializing in paleoanthropology and bioarchaeology. She received a BS in anthropology from Tulane University in 2008 and a PhD in anthropology from Washington University in St. Louis in 2014.

​Lacy explores dental cavities, periodontal disease, and tooth loss in Neandertals and early modern humans across Europe and Southwest Asia and given the prevalence among recent humans. More than just oral health, she looks at how oral diseases also reveal information about diet, environment, disease susceptibility, and overall health in individuals and populations.

Her latest project explores the reliability of bony indicators of respiratory health, their presence in ancient populations, and how they might correlate with oral health. Smoke inhalation is as ancient as the domestication of fire, and Lacy is collaborating with colleagues in the fields of human biology and archaeology to identify the health impacts of close human relationships with fire over the last half a million years.

Lacy also publishes on issues of sex and gender in the Paleolithic as well as in the field of anthropology. Her research expertise translates to teaching interests in biological anthropology, human health, and human-environment interactions. She has a strong interest in supporting undergraduate research opportunities. She was interim director of the Office of Undergraduate Research at California State University, Dominguez Hills before joining the University of Delaware.

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Sarah Leighton

PhD Candidate in Social Psychology, University of Arizona
I am a PhD candidate in social psychology at the University of Arizona. I hold a BA in neurobiology and behavior from Cornell University and an MS in the psychology of human-animal interaction from Purdue University. My career focuses on the role of service dog partnerships in biopsychosocial outcomes for people with disabilities. From 2010-2021, I worked for the world’s largest service dog provider, Canine Companions. I am an Assistance Dogs International (ADI) Certified Service Dog Instructor and, in 2016, I was promoted to the leadership role of National Director of Training and Client Services. In 2021, recognizing a need to build the empirical evidence base underlying the service dog intervention, I joined the Organization for Human-Animal Interaction Research Education (OHAIRE) under Dr. Maggie O’Haire as a PhD student. My research leverages a transdisciplinary approach to translate service dog partners’ lived experiences into actionable data. I am a University of Arizona One Health Research Fellow, a member of Psi Chi International Honor Society, and recipient of the 2024 APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology.

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Sarah Lindop

Senior Lecturer in Finance, Aberystwyth University
Sarah joined the staff of the School of Management and Business in October 2007 as a lecturer in finance. Previously, she was a full time PhD researcher here. She has since successfully completed her doctoral research, which examines whether UK shareholder 'dividend taxes' are capitalised into share prices and has continued her research career focusing on changes to taxation, tax avoidance, corporate governance, dividend policy and recently the economic impacts of Covid-19.
Sarah teaches Corporate Finance, Financial Markets and Institutions, Investments, Banking and Taxation at both the UG and PG level.
In 2016 Sarah was promoted to Senior Lecturer in Finance and is currently the Degree Scheme Co-ordinator for Accounting and Finance and Business Finance and the Director of Student Experience and Employability for the Business School.

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Sarah Lonsdale

Senior Lecturer in Journalism, City, University of London
Dr Sarah Lonsdale has been a journalist for twenty five years, training on the Reading Chronicle before joining the Observer newspaper in 1990 as a general reporter. During her time on the Observer she specialised in stories concerning social justice. She is now freelance and has written for a wide variety of publications including: Observer, Financial Times, Evening Standard, Daily Telegraph, Sunday Telegraph, Daily Mail, Independent on Sunday, Country Homes and Interiors Magazine, Observer Food Monthly, National Geographic Green and the Sunday Times. She was a weekly columnist for the Sunday Telegraph 2006 - 2015 writing about environmental issues, particularly the threat of climate change.

Dr Lonsdale holds a BA (Hons) and MA from the University of Cambridge in Modern and Medieval Languages (French and Italian). She recently completed her PhD, 'The Representation of Journalists and the Newspaper Press in British Literature 1900 - 1939' at the University of Kent. She holds a Post Graduate Certificate in Higher Education (PGCHE). She joined City University London in 2013 after six years as a lecturer at the University of Kent, teaching at the School of English and the Centre for Journalism there.

She is author of The Journalist in British Fiction and Film, published by Bloomsbury, July 2016.

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Sarah Maddocks

Lecturer in Microbiology, Cardiff Metropolitan University
The mainstay of my research is to investigate processes involved in the host-pathogen relationship as infection ensues. This includes characterisation of bacterial adhesions, transcriptional regulators, quorum sensing and virulence gene expression. I also use biofilm models to ascertain the effect of individual host environmental stimuli, such as iron restriction, on the developing microbial community and use in vitro models to determine the impact this might have during infection.

A different branch of my research focuses on novel antimicrobials and their efficacy against healthcare associated pathogens. Part of these studies are concerned with identifying antimicrobial targets to determine a mode of action and facilitate most appropriate use within the clinical environment, with the aim of preventing the emergence of strains that might exhibit resistance. I have ongoing research collaborations with Dr. Kevin Purdy (University of Warwick), Dr Andrew Collins and Dr Michele Barbour (University of Bristol), and Prof Simon Andrews (Reading University).

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Sarah Maessen

Research Associate, Auckland University of Technology
Dr Sarah Maessen is a Research Fellow in the Clinical Audit and Research team at Hato Hone St John. Her research spans a wide range of topics related to pre-hospital medicine with support from the Paramedicine department at AUT. She is particularly interested in how health practices can improve health equity.

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Sarah McDonald

Clinical Psychologist and Research Fellow, University of Nottingham

D Clin Psy, Master of Public Health, MA Psychology
Adult Mental Health work for 7 years in the NHS and private care
Researcher in Implementation science and healthcare research; moving to Nottingham Trent University in June 2016 to join the Centre for Children, Young People and Families (http://www.ntu.ac.uk/soc/collaborative_working/nccypf/index.html)
Blogger for http://www.thementalelf.net

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Sarah Neill

Professor of Nursing, University of Plymouth
Professor Sarah Neill is a Professor in Nursing in the School of Nursing and Midwifery, Faculty of Health at the University of Plymouth. Sarah is a children’s nursing academic with over 25 years’ experience in higher education, initially focussed on teaching and learning for the next generation of children’s nurses, then gradually more focussed on research. Sarah’s research is focussed on acute childhood illness in children under five years of age, predominantly in the home and in first contact health services, such as primary care and urgent and emergency care. She works collaboratively with parents and health care professionals to understand patient and professionals experiences, their decision making and to develop interventions to improve access to care for acutely ill children. Sarah leads the Acutely Sick Kid Safety Netting Interventions for Families (ASK SNIFF) research programme www.asksniff.org.uk and was the Chief Investigator on the Before Arrival at Hospital (BeArH) NIHR RfPB funded project https://www.northampton.ac.uk/research/before-arrival-at-hospital-bearh/. Sarah is a qualitative researcher with a specific interest in Glaserian grounded theory. Sarah chaired the Faculty of Health's Faculty Research Ethics and Integrity Committee from February 2020 until October 2021. Internationally Sarah co-chairs the International Network for Child and Family Centred Care and the Conference Planning Committee for the International Family Nursing Association.

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Sarah Niblock

Visiting Professor on the Doctoral Programme in Counselling Psychology, York St John University
Over 15 years’ experience of executive leadership as Chief Executive of UK Council for
Psychotherapy, Associate Dean of School of Media, Arts and Design, University of Westminster (London) and Head of Department and Professor at Brunel University London.
Established global reach as a journalist, broadcaster, author and academic, including regular
contribution to BBC (including multiple live radio appearances), Forbes, Huffpost, The Conversation, The Guardian, The Times, Cosmopolitan, British Medical Journal and numerous other titles. Monthly guest columnist and podcaster for Psychologies magazine until 2022. Sarah has spoken at prestigious arts, science and cultural
venues and festivals globally and served as the voice of universities in public ceremonies and in the press.

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Sarah Njeri

Lecturer Humanitarianism and Development, SOAS, University of London
Sarah is a Research Fellow with the Humanitarian Policy Group. She is a peace and conflict scholar by training with more than 20 years' experience working on conflict prevention, post conflict peacebuilding, humanitarian disarmament, advocacy and development-related issues in Africa. Sarah’s previous research within the humanitarian sector has been in peace and development writ large especially on the adverse impact of explosive ordnances such as landmines and other explosive remnants in post conflict contexts. She therefore has vast knowledge of the branch of humanitarian sector that is mine action. While her regional research focus has been largely been the Greater Horn of Africa with extensive experience on Somaliland, Tanzania and Ethiopia, Sarah has also got research experience in Angola, Sierra Leone, and Cambodia.

Before joining ODI, Sarah was previously working at the African Leadership Centre (King’s College London) as a Research Associate on a project funded by the Global Research Challenges Fund project, that focused on developing a combined technological and socio-economic approach to freeing affected communities from anti-vehicle mines. She previously worked in various academic institutions in research management and administration roles.

Previously she has worked in the humanitarian aid sector, working on policy and advocacy issues with the Jesuit Refugees Service - Eastern Africa at the Regional office in Kenya.

Sarah has an MA in Conflict Resolution and PhD in Peace and Conflict Studies from the University of Bradford’s Peace Studies and International Development Department.

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Sarah Percy

Professor of International Relations, The University of Queensland
Sarah Percy came to UWA from the University of Oxford, where she was University Lecturer in International Relations at Merton College. She writes widely on issues surrounding unconventional combatants, including mercenaries, private military and security companies, and pirates.

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Sarah Pillar

Research Development Manager, Telethon Kids Institute
Sarah Pillar is the Research Development Manager at CliniKids, at the Telethon Kids Institute. Her role revolves around the intersection between clinical and research work - getting research into clinical practice, and shaping clinical questions into research projects. Sarah is a Speech Pathologist by background and she developed a passion for supporting autistic children and their families through working directly with families in metropolitan and country WA. Sarah has been involved in a number of research projects at the Telethon Kids Institute, including CliniKids breakthrough research into pre-emptive intervention for infants, which supports the development of social-communication skills prior to the child receiving a diagnosis. Sarah was also a member of the team that developed Australia's first National Guideline for Supporting Autistic Children in Australia.

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Sarah Pogoda

Senior Lecturer in German, Bangor University
Originally from the Bergische Land (Nordrhein-Westfalen), I studied German literature, history and communication at the Freie Universität Berlin. As part of my undergraduate programme I went on an Erasmus exchange to the University of Vienna. After my Magister Artium I completed a doctorate in German literature. Having worked as a tutor for GfL (German as a Foreign Language) in the private sector in Berlin, I went to the University of Sheffield as DAAD-Lektorin in 2012. In autumn 2016 I came to Bangor University.

Teaching
At the Freie Universität Berlin and the Humboldt Universität zu Berlin I offered several modules on Political Studies and German Literature of the 20th century. As a DAAD-Lektor at the University of Sheffield (2012-2016) I taught modules on contemporary German culture and media, post-wall German art, film and performance, as well as modules on contemporary German literature. Alongside this research led teaching, I have been teaching German language at all levels (ab initio to near native competence) since 2011. At Bangor University I continue teaching German language at all levels, as well as undergraduate and postgraduate teaching in my field of research expertise, this includes e.g. the modules "Culture in Context" (LXE 1600); "The German Film" (LXG 2008), "Performing Germany" (LXG 3036), "German Avant-Garde" (LXM 4037) and "Critical Theory" (LXM 4001).

In my teaching, I prefer to integrate artistic practices, such as Happenings and Creative Writing exercises. I do not only understand this kind of pracice based learning as best practice in teaching, but first and foremost, I want to show my students that the revolution starts with ourselves and inside ourselves. It is this revolution of the self which I consider as the key experience of life, and of university life in particular. I was nominated for the Special Recognition Award.

Research
My current research interests are 20th and 21st century Avant Garde, with a focus on performance. Here, my core research considers the German film maker, theatre director and actionist artist Christoph Schlingensief (1960-2010). In this regard I am also particularly interested in the political potential of art and how contemporary artist interfere in the public sphere.

I am also engaged in diversifying the critical thinking methods in academia by engageing with artistic research methods. In this context I co-founded the Avant Garde experimental art collective NWK, kindly supported by Deutsch-Walisische Freundschaft.

One further creative writing projects is a performative writing exercise in which both Welsh and German are explored in their shared knowledge about Fluxus art. For this purpose, I invented a new literary genre called "Verifiction". This critical method is informed by Avant Garde strategies and has shown suitable for uncovering hidden knowledge in language.

Further research interests lie in the interrelations of literature and architecture and, more generally, in the history, culture, politics and literature of post-1945 Germany, including the former GDR. In my doctoral thesis I look at metaphors of building and dwelling in post-war and contemporary German literature and culture. In addition I am interested in contemporary German literature in general.

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Sarah Polkinghorne

Research Fellow, Social Change, RMIT University

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