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Chris Cunneen

Professor Cunneen has a national and international reputation as a leading criminologist specialising in Indigenous people and the law, juvenile justice, restorative justice, policing, prison issues and human rights. Chris has participated with a number of Australian Royal Commissions and Inquiries (including the Stolen Generations Inquiry, the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody and the National Inquiry into Racist Violence), and with the federal Australian Human Rights Commission. He taught criminology at Sydney Law School (1990-2005) where he was appointed as Professor in 2004. He was also the Director of the Institute of Criminology (1999-2005) at the University of Sydney.

Professor Cunneen has held research positions with the Indigenous Law Centre, University of New South Wales (UNSW), and the NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research. Between 2006 and 2010 he was the NewSouth Global Chair in Criminology at UNSW. He was Professor of Justice and Social Inclusion at the Cairns Institute, James Cook University and continues as a Conjoint Professor at JCU. Since 2015 Chris has been Professor of Criminology in the Faculties of Arts and Social Sciences and Law at UNSW. He is situated in the School of Social Sciences.

He has wide research interests that cross the fields of criminology, social science and law. In particular his interests include Australian prisons and the growth in imprisonment, juvenile justice, restorative justice, and the relationship of Indigenous people to dominant legal systems both in Australia and internationally. His work also displays a strong interest in human rights and social justice.

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Chris Grover

I am a Senior Lecturer in Social Policy in the Department of Applied Social Science at Lancaster University. I am also a member of the Centre for Disability Research (CeDR). My research interests include social security, income maintenance and labour market policy and their implications for disabled people.

My main current research interests are concerned with analysing contemporary and historical changes in income maintenance and labour market policy. I am interested in the ways in which such policies are shaped by concerns with groups in the population that are deemed to be 'problematic', such as lone mothers and young people, and the ways in which income maintenance and labour market policies are held to be more important because of their macro-economic benefits, rather than their social benefits.

I am currently engaged in research at the National Archives which is focusing upon the introduction of Family Income Supplement in 1971 and how one of the guiding principles - that market wages should not be subsidised by the state - which had shaped social security policy making from the introduction of the Poor Law Amendment Act, was overcome by policy makers in the 1970s.

More directly related to criminology, I am interested in the press reporting of crime, particularly the reporting of sexual offences and the ways in which groups in the population (most notably black and working class men) are constructed as sex offenders.

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Chris McCarthy

Dr Chris McCarthy received his BSc(Hons) (1999) and Masters (2005) degrees in computer science from The University of Melbourne, and PhD from the Australian National University in 2010. Chris has worked both domestically and internationally as an academic lecturer and researcher in computer vision and robotics, having held positions in Singapore (1999-2001), Italy (2007) and most recently with NICTA's Computer Vision Research Group in Canberra (2009-2015), and is a member of the Bionic Vision Australia consortium. In 2015 he took up a lecturing position with Swinburne University of Technology.

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Chris Shannahan

Research Fellow in Faith and Peaceful Relations, Coventry University

Prior to joining the Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations at Coventry University in 2015 Dr Chris Shannahan was Lecturer in Religion and Theology at the University of Manchester (2013-2015). His Doctorate (2008, University of Birmingham) developed the first critical analysis of urban theology in the UK and led to work as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Urban Theology and then a Teaching Fellow in Religion and Society at the University of Birmingham (2009-2012) where he developed a major ethnographic project working alongside unemployed young men on a large Birmingham housing estate.

His first monograph, 'Voices from the Borderland' (2010) was described as a ‘ground-breaking’ example of cross-cultural urban theology and is a set text at Universities and Theological Colleges in the UK, the USA and Australia. His second monograph, 'A Theology of Community Organizing' (2013) provided the first systematic theological analysis of broad-based community organising. His research also utilises Hip-Hop culture as a discourse of meaning, as seen in his 2012 partnership with the street artist Mohammed ‘aerosol’ Ali on his ‘Bromford Dreams – Graffiti Spiritualities’ action research project.

Chris Shannahan's research arises from more than 20 years grassroots experience as the head of Religious Education in a large East London Secondary school; a youth worker in the East End of London and Trenchtown, Jamaica; a Methodist Minister in inner-city London and Birmingham and a community organiser. This diverse background informs and influences his commitment to researching, teaching and writing for progressive social change.

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Chris Thompson

Chris is a lecturer in chemistry at Monash University, specialising in chemistry education, while moonlighting in high resolution spectroscopy using the Australian Synchrotron. Chris originally studied Bachelor degrees in both Science and Arts at the Australian National University before completing his PhD at Monash University, and spending time as a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Melbourne.

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Chris Turney

I am a Professor of Earth Sciences and Climate Change at the University of New South Wales where my team and I are focusing our efforts on using the past to better understand the causes and impacts of future environmental change. As part of this I set up and now direct the Earth's Past Future Project (www.earthspastfuture.com), an international, multidisciplinary programme dedicated to exploiting records of past change to help reduce the uncertainties surrounding future projections; within this I co-lead the Ellsworth Mountains Project (http://ellsworthmountains.com/) and the Ancient Kauri Project (http://ancientkauriproject.com/). To do something positive about climate change, I am working with a wonderful group of people at CarbonScape (http://carbonscape.com/), a carbon refining company that has developed microwave technology to fix carbon from the atmosphere and make a host of green bi-products, including activated carbon, sustainable fuels and biochar.

Communicating science is more critical than ever. As a scientist I believe we need to show why science is such a wonderful tool for understanding the world around us; not just the headline discoveries but how science actually works. I have written several books, the most recent of which is 1912: The Year The World Discovered Antarctica which looked at the dawn of a new age in understanding the natural world, and how we might reawaken the public's excitement for exploration and discovery.

Inspired by the events surrounding 1912 I led the Australasian Antarctic Expedition 2013-2014, a privately-funded multidisciplinary scientific expedition, that set out to discover the environmental changes taking place in the south. A major part of the AAE 2013-2014 was communicating our scientific findings – from the deep field and in real time.

You can follow my team in the lab and the field using the full range manner of social media as Intrepid Science (www.intrepidscience.com), reporting discoveries when they happen, where they happen.

I'm passionate about science, adventure and leadership. Please feel free to contact me.

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Christian Hampel

PhD candidate, University of Cambridge

Christian is a doctoral candidate in Management on the Innovation, Strategy & Organisation pathway. His research explores how organizations manage reputations with a particular focus on fighting stigmatisation, reviving legitimacy, and altering institutions.

Christian joined the PhD programme in 2012 after having undertaken a bachelor degree at Warwick, a research master degree at Cambridge and work experience in consulting. At Cambridge Judge Business School he initiated the "Methods Forum", a platform for the School's faculty and students to discuss the use of research methods. Christian's PhD research is funded by a scholarship from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). Christian was a visiting pre-doctoral fellow at the Management & Organizations Department of the Kellogg School of Management (Northwestern University) from September to December 2015.

Christian's teaching experience includes roles as seminar lecturer and teaching assistant in a variety of courses (research masters, MBA, EMBA), covering the domains of organisational behaviour, organisation theory, social entrepreneurship and strategy.

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Christian Ridley

I just received my PhD in Plant Biotechnology from the Department of Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge. My research focuses on the development of industrial-scale algae biotechnology, for applications such as biofuels, nutritional supplements and animal feeds.

During my PhD, I explored whether algal-bacterial consortia could enhance the productivity and stability of algal cultures, so that growing algae at very large scales might be improved. Currently, I am working in the Cambridge Algal Innovation Centre, working with biotechnology companies to explore how we can better exploit algae for more sustainable food, feed and fuels.

I'm broadly interested in science - from microbiology to drug development and space exploration - and in the crossover between science and entrepreneurship.

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Christina Tworeck

Ph.D. Student in Developmental Psychology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

I research the development of moral beliefs and beliefs about social groups. I am interested in how cognition and social context influence these beliefs in children and adults.

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Christine Curry

Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Miami

Dr. Curry is an academic generalist, practicing both obstetrics and gynecology. She has an interest in comprehensive reproductive health. She is supportive of women seeking trials of labor after previous cesarean sections and those desiring external cephalic versions. Her gynecology practice includes both outpatient well woman care, contraception and sexually transmitted disease care, as well as inpatient surgical management of benign gynecologic disease.

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Christoph Adami

As a computational biologist, Dr. Adami’s main focus is Darwinian evolution, which he studies theoretically, experimentally, and computationally, at different levels of organization (from simple molecules to brains). He has pioneered the application of methods from information theory to the study of evolution, and designed the “Avida” system that launched the use of digital life (mutating and adapting computer viruses living in a controlled computer environment) as a tool for investigating basic questions in evolutionary biology. He was also a Principal Scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory where he conducted research into the foundations of quantum mechanics and quantum information theory. Dr. Adami earned a BS in physics and mathematics and a Diplom in theoretical physics from the University of Bonn (Germany) and MA and PhD degrees in physics from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. He wrote the textbook “Introduction to Artificial Life” (Springer, 1998) and is the recipient of NASA’s Exceptional Achievement Medal. He was elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in 2011.

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Christoph Meyer

Christoph Meyer studied political science and sociology in Hamburg before completing an MPhil (1997) and a PhD in International Relations at the University of Cambridge in 2001. He was a visiting researcher at the Max Planck-Institute for the Study of Societies and a Marie Curie Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Centre of European Policy Studies. Before joining King's College in January 2007, he was a Lecturer at Birkbeck, University of London, and a research associate at the University of Cologne. He also worked intermittently in journalism, writing articles for the NZZ, FAZ and Frankfurter Rundschau.
Professor Meyer’s research interests are wide-ranging within the field of European Union studies and international relations. In terms of policy fields, he has been working on security and defence policy, including conflict prevention, public communication and media coverage as well as economic governance. He has contributed to debates about the European public sphere and political integration, European strategic culture and questions of forecasting and prevention of risks.
Professor Meyer has published in leading academic journals in International Relations (ISQ, EJIR) and European Union Studies (JCMS, JEPP) and edited two books and special issues/sections of journals as well as two single-authored monographs.
Professor Meyer is mainly interested in supervising students in areas relating to EU foreign policy, political communication, and finally, forecasting, warning and prevention in international affairs.

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Christopher Davey

Consultant Psychiatrist and Head of Mood Disorders Research at Orygen, The National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health, University of Melbourne

I am a consultant psychiatrist at Orygen Youth Health, where I lead the clinical and research program in youth depression. I lead a clinical team of psychiatrists, psychologists, and other allied health professionals in the Youth Mood Clinic, where we assess and manage young people with severe and complex mood disorders. My research interests include studying effective treatments for depression, and using neuroimaging to better understand depression and its treatment.

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Christopher Grey

BA (Econ) Hons, Politics, University of Manchester 1987. PhD, Organization Studies, University of Manchester 1992. Previously Professor of Organization Studies at University of Cambridge and then at University of Warwick. Leverhulme Major Research Fellow 2010-2012. Currently Professor of Organization Studies and Director of Research at the School of Management, Royal Holloway, University of London. Visiting Professor at Universite Paris-Dauphine, France.

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Christopher Hobson

Associate Professor, School of Political Science and Economics, Waseda University

Christopher Hobson an Associate Professor in the School of Political Science and Economics, Waseda University. He holds a Ph.D. in Political Science and International Relations from the Australian National University. He is the author of The Rise of Democracy: Revolution, War and Transformations in International Politics since 1776 (Edinburgh University Press, 2015), and the co-editor of The Conceptual Politics of Democracy Promotion (Routledge 2011), which has just been re-issued in paperback.

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Christos Kotsogiannis

Christos Kotsogiannis is Professor of Economics at the University of Exeter and a Research Fellow at CESifo, Germany. He was born in Athens and studied for his Ph.D. in Economics at the University of Essex.

His research is primarily in the field of public economics, political economics, environmental economics and international trade, with publications in journals such as,American Economic Review, Journal of International Economics, Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Journal of Public Economics, Journal of Public Economic Theory,International Tax and Public Finance, Journal of Urban Economics and Economics Letters. He has been the guest co-editor for a special issue on climate change issues for the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Environmental and Resource Economics and International Tax and Public Finance. He is currently on the editorial board of the Journal of Tax Administration and he is one of the three editors of CESifo Economic Studies.

Kotsogiannis has been a visiting scholar at the International Monetary Fund, and a consultant for the World Bank on issues of fuel subsidies. He was Head of the Economics Department at University of Exeter Business School from 2011-2014 and held a Leverhulme Trust Research Fellowship in 2009-2011. In 2015 Kotsogiannis was awarded the Copernicus International Fellowship from the University IUSS-Ferrara 1391.

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Cicely Martson

Senior Lecturer in Social Science, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

My research interests include interdisciplinary work on sexual and reproductive health, particularly sexual behaviour and contraception among young people, as well as maternal and newborn health, health promotion, and involving communities in promoting health. I have an overarching interest in methodology and developing methods to investigate complex social interventions. I hold an undergraduate degree in Human Sciences from Oxford, MSc Medical Demography at LSHTM, and an interdisciplinary PhD and postdoc in young people's sexual behaviour and behaviour change, with fieldwork in Mexico City. I spent some time at Imperial College London where I conducted research and ran a Public Health MSc, returning to LSHTM in 2005.

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Claire Corkhill

Claire Corkhill is a Vice Chancellor’s Research Fellow in the nuclear waste materials-focused NucleUS Immobilisation Science Laboratory at the University of Sheffield. Previously, she was a post-doctoral research associate in the Departments of Materials Science and Engineering and Civil Engineering at the University of Sheffield. Claire obtained an MEarthSci in Geology and a PhD in Mineralogy and Geochemistry at the University of Manchester, working in the Mineral Physics and Chemistry research group.

Her research focuses on understanding the geological disposal of nuclear waste, specifically in understanding the durability of glass, ceramic and cement materials in groundwater. She is also interested in how radioactive elements interact with cement and the environment.

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Claire Molloy

Claire Molloy is Professor of Film, Television and Digital Media, Director of the Institute for Creative Enterprise (ICE) and Director of the Centre for Human Animal Studies (CfHAS).

Her research interests focus on the critical junctures between media, film and Animal Studies; (un)sustainable consumption; eco-media; American cinema; activism; and, film and politics.

Her recent publications include the books Memento (2010), Popular Media and Animals (2011), Beyond Human: From Animality to Transhumanism (2012) and American Independent Cinema: indie, indiewood and beyond (2013). She is currently co-editing The Routledge Companion to Film and Politics. In addition, her recent work on popular depictions of animal cruelty, industrial-economic analysis of commercial wildlife films, a history of independent nature films, news coverage of dangerous dogs, representations of nature in commercial feature films, farmed animals product advertising, and neoliberal aesthetics have been published in various edited collections and journals.

Her research on news media discourses and the UK coastline forms one of four case studies on non-monetary valuations of nature (WP5) for the National Ecosystem Assessment (2013) and she is a contributing author to a guide on deliberative methods for non-monetary valuations of nature for policy-makers and key decision-makers (2014). She is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Animal Ethics, serves on the Vegan Society Academic Advisory Committee and the Minding Animals International Programme Committee, and is an advisor to the Animal History Museum. In addition to reviewing for fourteen different publishers and journals and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, Claire is Consultant Editor for the Journal of Animal Ethics and on the Advisory Board for the Palgrave Macmillan Book Series on Animal Ethics.

Her current research examines various aspects of sustainable ethical food production, particularly where these relate to media regulation, meat and dairy consumption, and the tensions between sustainable consumption and neoliberal constructions of consumer pleasure. She is involved in research on women and wildlife filmmaking, media discourses on animal sentience and she continues to write about Christopher Nolan’s films.

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Clare Alley

Lecturer in Psychology, University of Salford

Clare Allely is a Lecturer in Psychology at the University of Salford in Manchester, England, and is an affiliate member of the Gillberg Neuropsychiatry Centre at Gothenburg University, Sweden. Clare is also an Honorary Research Fellow in the College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences affiliated to the Institute of Health and Wellbeing at the University of Glasgow.

Clare holds a PhD in psychology from the University of Manchester and has previously graduated with an MA (hons.) in Psychology from the University of Glasgow, an MRes in Psychological Research Methods from the University of Strathclyde and an MSc degree in Forensic Psychology from Glasgow Caledonian University. Between June 2011 and June 2014, Clare worked at the University of Glasgow as a postdoctoral researcher.

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Clare Wright

Associate Professor in History, La Trobe University

Dr Clare Wright is an award-winning historian, author and broadcaster who has worked in politics, academia and the media. She is the author of Beyond the Ladies Lounge: Australia's Female Publicans (MUP 2003, Text 2014) and The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka (Text 2013), which won the 2014 Stella Prize and the NIB Literary Prize and was short-listed for the Prime Minister's, Queensland, NSW and WA Literary Awards, and long-listed for a Walkley. Clare researched, wrote and presented the acclaimed ABC1 documentary Utopia Girls and devised and co-wrote the ABC documentary series, The War That Changed Us.

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Clay Calvert

Brechner Eminent Scholar in Mass Communication, University of Florida

Clay Calvert is the Brechner Eminent Scholar in Mass Communication and Director of the Marion B. Brechner First Amendment Project at the University of Florida.

In Spring 2011, Professor Calvert served as Visiting Professor of Law at the University of the Pacific McGeorge School of Law in Sacramento, where he taught two sections of Constitutional Law II, covering equal protection, substantive due process and freedom of expression.

Calvert has authored or co-authored more than 130 law journal articles on topics related to freedom of expression. He has published articles in journals affiliated with the law schools at Boston University, Columbia, Duke, Harvard, Georgetown, New York University, Northwestern, University of California Berkeley, University of California Los Angeles, University of Pennsylvania, University of Southern California, University of Virginia, Vanderbilt and William & Mary, among others.

In 2016, Calvert captured a veritable academic triple crown, winning top faculty awards for papers submitted to the law divisions at the Broadcast Education Association conference (Las Vegas), the AEJMC Southeast Colloquium (Baton Rouge) and the AEJMC annual conference (Minneapolis).

As director of the Marion B. Brechner First Amendment Project, Calvert has filed, as counsel of record, multiple friend-of-the-court briefs with the United States Supreme Court in cases such as Elonis v. United States and Brown v. Entertainment Merchants Association.

Since 2015, his op-ed commentaries have appeared in Fortune, Huffington Post, Newsweek, New Republic and The Conversation.

Professor Calvert is co-author, along with Don R. Pember, of the market-leading undergraduate media law textbook, Mass Media Law, 19th ed. (McGraw-Hill), and is author of the book Voyeur Nation: Media, Privacy, and Peering in Modern Culture (Westview Press, 2000).

He received his J.D. with Great Distinction in 1991 from the University of the Pacific's McGeorge School of Law and then earned a Ph.D. in 1996 in Communication from Stanford University, where he also completed his undergraduate work with a B.A. in Communication in 1987. He is a member of both the State Bar of California and the Bar of the Supreme Court of the United States.

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Clive Church

A graduate of Exeter University, Prof Church’s academic career started as a Teaching Assistant in University College, London and the School of Oriental and African Studies. From 1963-65 he was Junior Lecturer in Modern History in Trinity College, Dublin. From there he went to the University of Lancaster as Lecturer in French History, rising to be Senior Lecturer in European Studies in 1975. Transferring to Kent in 1981 he taught a variety of historical and political courses, including Swiss Studies, first for the School of Languages and then in the School of Politics and International Relations. Promoted Reader in 1988 and Professor in 1992, he was awarded a Jean Monnet Chair in European Integration in 1995. He was the first Director of the Kent Centre for Europe, a Jean Monnet Centre of Excellence, and has been an Emeritus Professor since 2003.

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Clive Hamilton

Professor of Public Ethics, Centre For Applied Philosophy & Public Ethics (CAPPE), Charles Sturt University

Until early 2008 Clive Hamilton was the Executive Director of The Australia Institute, Australia’s leading progressive think tank, which he founded in 1993. Prior to that he taught at the ANU and was a federal public servant. He has held a number of visiting academic positions, including at Sciences Po, Yale University and the University of Oxford. He is currently a member of the Climate Change Authority. In 2009 he was the Australian Greens candidate in the Higgins by-election.

Clive is the author of a number of best-selling books, including Growth Fetish, Affluenza (with Richard Denniss), and Requiem for a Species: Why we resist the truth about climate change. His most recent book is Earthmasters: The dawn of the age of climate engineering (Yale University Press, 2013).

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Colin Murray

Senior Lecturer in Law, Newcastle University

Colin Murray joined Newcastle University's Law School in January 2007 following the completion of his postgraduate research at Durham University. Colin's current research is focused in the fields of constitutional law, national security law, legal history and public law. This work has fed into official consultations on prisoner voting rights, the office of Lord Chancellor, drone strikes, Northern Ireland and "Brexit" and the UK's relationship with Saudi Arabia.

His work concentrates on the concepts of citizenship and allegiance and of their increasing significance in legal discourse. His research concentrates on the concepts of citizenship and allegiance and of their increasing significance in legal discourse. Colin's current project examines the UK Government's use of "Good Citizenship" reasoning to deny prisoners the right to vote. This work has fed into official role as a UK Parliamentary advisor on prisoner voting rights. With Roger Masterman, Colin is co-author of the textbook Exploring Constitutional Law published by Pearson. Colin has published in Public Law, Northern Ireland Law Quarterly, International and Comparative Law Quarterly and the Kings Law Journal amongst others.

Colin is currently working (alongside A. O'Donoghue (Durham), S. de Mars (Newcastle) and B. Warwick (Durham))on the ESRC-supported project “Constitutional Conundrums: Northern Ireland, the European Union and Human Rights".

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Colleen Murrell

Senior Lecturer in Journalism, Monash University

I am just beginning a new job as a senior lecturer in journalism at Monash University in Melbourne, after a lengthy stint at Deakin University.

From October 2015 to January 2016 I was a senior visiting research fellow at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) in the Department of Media and Communications. I worked on projects related to the different editions of The Guardian and the global news agencies' gate-keeping of Syrian UGC.

I teach radio, television and international news. I also research international newsgathering, transnational television and social media. I am the co-secretary of the Journalism Education & Research Association of Australia and have been an occasional contributor to ABC Breakfast TV's newspaper slot.

My book 'Foreign Correspondents and International Newsgathering: The Role of Fixers' was published by Routledge Research (2015). I have a PhD in Media & Comms from the University of Melbourne and a Masters in International Journalism from City University in London.

In my previous career I worked as a reporter, producer and news editor for a number of international news organisations including the BBC, ITN and APTN. I am most active on social media on Twitter as @ivorytowerjourn

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Conor Deane-McKenna

Doctoral Researcher in Cyberwarfare, University of Birmingham

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Costas Milas

Professor of Finance, University of Liverpool

Prof Costas Milas is an expert on Monetary Policy issues (such as interest rate setting behaviour) related to the UK, US and Eurozone economies, respectively. He is also an expert on debt policies pursued by the Eurozone peripheral economies (Greece, Italy, Ireland, Spain and Portugal).

He holds an MSc (Economics and Finance) and a PhD (Economics) degree from Warwick University. He also holds a BSc (Statistics) from the Athens University of Economics and Business. Before joining Liverpool in 2011, he worked for the Universities of Warwick, Sheffield, Brunel, City and Keele.

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Craig Froome

Craig has extensive consulting experience and has undertaken a number of projects looking at renewable energy scenarios, including the preparation of a discussion papers for both government and industry. Most recently, he co-authored The University of Queensland’s latest major energy research paper on Delivering a Competitive Australian Power System.

A member of the University’s Renewable Energy Technical Advisory Committee, he was instrumental in having the 1.22 MW Solar Photovoltaic Array at the St Lucia campus deployed.

Craig is also a member of the School of Economics, Energy Economics and Management Group (EEMG), which focusses on making key solar technologies more affordable.

In conjunction with this group, he worked on the I-Grid Research Cluster with the CSIRO Distributed Energy Flagship to model and quantify the benefits of distributed energy systems while taking into account the costs of deploying and integrating them into the Australian electricity system.

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Craig Longman

Craig D. Longman is a Deputy Director and a Senior Researcher with Jumbunna Indigenous House of Learning (Research Unit) at the University of Technology, Sydney. He is also a practicing Solicitor.

Admitted to the NSW Supreme Court in 2007, Mr Longman has worked extensively in Criminal and Civil Litigation, including in high-profile Human Rights matters such as the defence of Palm Island man Lex Wotton to charges arising from the events on Palm Island in 2004.

Joining Jumbunna in October 2010, his research and advocacy focuses upon the experience of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals in their interactions with the Australian legal system, particularly in the area of Criminal and Coronial Law. He has continued to assist community members in relation to coronial matters, and has prepared and presented on reform in relation to numerous areas of law reform, including Bail, Sentencing, Policing, Legal Aid funding and Native Title.

Recently appointed to the NSW Law Society Indigenous Issues Committee, he also holds directorships with not-for-profit Indigenous advocacy organisations.

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Craig Oneill

Director of the Macquarie Planetary Research Centre/Associate Professor in Geodynamics, Macquarie University

A/Prof. Craig O'Neill is the Director of the Macquarie Planetary Research Centre, and an Associate Professor in geodynamics and planetary science in the Department of Earth and Planetary Science/ARC CCFS CoE at Macquarie University.

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Craig Smith

Research Investigator, University of Michigan

Dr. Craig Smith’s research focuses on children’s social cognitive development and links to social behavior. Examples of specific areas of interest are: children’s developing understanding of distributive and retributive justice, children’s understanding of antisociality, children’s reactions to conflicts and mitigating accounts (apologies, confessions, etc.), influences on children’s money saving and spending behaviors, links between math performance and cognition about fairness, and children’s use of social input as a guide for future thinking.

Craig is currently the director of the Living Lab project at the University of Michigan. The Living Lab is a research/education model that brings developmental research into community settings such as museums and libraries. The UM Living Lab sites currently include the Ann Arbor Hands-On Museum, the UM Museum of Natural History, and the main branch of the Ann Arbor District Library. Since the start of the Living Lab project in 2012, over 6,000 children and families have participated in research in these community settings, and thousands more have had opportunities to converse with researchers studying child development.

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Craig Speelman

I graduated from UWA in 1985 with a Bachelor of Science (Honours) in Psychology, followed by a PhD in Psychology from UWA in 1992. In both degrees I completed research projects in Cognitive Psychology, the study of processes underlying thought. The focus of my PhD project was cognitive skill acquisition, which is my main area of expertise today.

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Cynthia Firey Eakin

Dr. Cynthia Eakin is an Associate Professor of Accounting. She currently serves as the Associate Dean for Academic Programs at the Eberhardt School of Business. She also is the school's Learning Assessment Coordinator.

Dr. Eakin earned a Ph.D. in accounting as well as a Master of Accounting degree with special emphasis in taxation from The Florida State University in 1993. She has over 20 years of teaching experience in all areas of accounting and taxation at both the graduate and undergraduate level. She was an assistant professor at the University of Hawaii's Manoa campus for four years before coming to the Eberhardt School. She has published research in the areas of earnings management, disclosure ethics, and insider trading.

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Cynthia Meyers

Cynthia Meyers studies the advertising industry, past, present and future, and its role in the development of radio/TV and digital media. She also studies the television and radio industry, past, present, and future, and shifting business models.

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