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Adenike Akinsemolu

Vanguard Fellow, University of Birmingham
Adenike Akinsemolu is a Vanguard Fellow at the University of Birmingham, a Senior Research Fellow at Afe Babalola University, and the founder of the Green Institute. She is an expert in the field of environmental sustainability with over 10 years of experience in education and research. Adenike is a National Geographic Educator and a member of the United Nations Sustainable Development Solutions Network. She is committed to finding bold and effective solutions to complex challenges, including the fight against climate change. Adenike has a deep passion for promoting sustainable practices and solutions for organisations and communities, and she has a strong track record of success in developing and implementing sustainable initiatives. In addition to her work as an educator and researcher, Adenike is also the author of several books on sustainability, including "Principles of Green and Sustainability Science (Springer 2020)," "Biological Science, A Concise Introduction (The Green Institute, 2022)," and "An Introduction to Green Education (National Geographic, 2022)." She is always looking for opportunities to collaborate and share her knowledge and expertise with others who are committed to protecting the environment. She has been recognized as one of the Top 100 Conservation Leaders in Africa by the WWF. She is also an Associate Fellow of the Royal Commonwealth Society.

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Adewumi I. Badiora

Senior Lecturer, Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Olabisi Onabanjo University
Adewumi I. Badiora is a senior lecturer in urban and regional planning at Olabisi Onabanjo University, Ago-Iwoye, Nigeria.

He has a PhD in urban and regional planning from the Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife. Badiora's research specialisation is urban and community safety. His current research project is on situational crime prevention.

He was an expert consultant on the National Survey on Election Security Threats in Nigeria (2018-2019) and National Survey on Emerging Security Challenges in Nigeria (2021-2022) and facilitated Urban Studies Foundation (USF) knowledge mobilisation on securing urban spaces.

He currently leads the African Cities Research Consortium (ACRC) safety and security domain research in Lagos.

His research focuses on creating safer, more sustainable and healthy cities. Spatial statistical methods underline his research, which concentrates on the geography of crime and fear in urban and rural built environment, crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED), corruption in planning practice, governance, security, and distributive justice.

Badiora consults on crime dynamics and prevention.

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Adi Foord

Assistant Professor of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Maryland, Baltimore County
Before joining the UMBC Physics Department, Dr. Foord was a Porat Postdoctoral Fellow at Stanford University, working at the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology (KIPAC). While at KIPAC, Dr. Foord worked with Chandra and XMM-Newton to measure the X-ray activity of interacting supermassive black holes. She also used the Hubble Space Telescope, Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and WISE Infrared telescope to learn more about how the environments of supermassive black holes impact their evolution and growth.

Although there is now broad consensus that active galactic nuclei (AGN) play important roles in the evolution of their surroundings, the processes that trigger the various forms of AGN activity remain unclear. Major galaxy mergers have been predicted to induce AGN, however, whether or not galaxy-galaxy interactions trigger accretion onto SMBHs remains a topic of debate. Dr. Foord’s research focuses on observational flags of merger-driven SMBH growth, or dual AGN; they are signposts of ongoing galaxy formation and represent rare instances where the link between environment and black hole growth (or, lack thereof) can be probed. As an observational astronomer, Dr. Foord uses X-ray observations (Chandra, XMM-Newton, Swift) to observe accreting supermassive black holes, and connects their X-ray activity to the emission of their host galaxies (in optical and IR, with telescopes such as SDSS, HST, and WISE). Generally, Dr. Foord is interested in high-resolution X-ray astronomy and enjoys searching for evidence of extended X-ray emission around accreting supermassive black holes to better understand their evolution across cosmic time.

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Aditi Gurkar

Assistant Professor of Geriatric Medicine, University of Pittsburgh
Aditi U. Gurkar is an Assistant Professor in the Aging Institute, Division of Geriatric Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh. I believe that aging is one true mystery that surrounds us. Aging is inescapable and unfortunately the principal risk factor for a number of diseases including cancer, heart disease and Alzheimer disease (AD). If we can therefore unlock this mystery at a molecular level, we could uncover the Fountain of Youth and live healthier, fuller lives.

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Adiya Baratova Tudiyarova

MA student in Public Policy and Global Affiars, University of British Columbia
Adiya is an open-minded and internationally oriented individual currently completing her first year in Master's in Public Policy and Global Affairs (MPPGA) at the University of British Columbia.
She is a member of the Institute of Asian Research and has a wide range of experience working in the Public and Private sectors, including the International Centre for the Rapprochement of Cultures under the aegis of UNESCO (Category II). She has fluency in English, Spanish, Russian and Catalan. Her goal is to become a global leader in sustainable and equitable business development and social justice.

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Adriaan Van Der Walt

Lecturer: Physical Geography and GIS, University of the Free State
Dr Adriaan van der Walt, Lecturer in the Department of Geography at the University of the Free State (UFS), focuses his research on biometeorology (a specialist discipline exploring the role and climate change in physical and human environments) as well as climatology and geographic information systems.

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Adrian Beaumont

I am a PhD student at the University of Melbourne’s Department of Mathematics and Statistics. Since 1998, I have had great interest in electoral politics, and I keenly follow both Australian and US elections. In the lead-up to the Australian Federal election, I will be writing a post every week about the latest polls and what they mean for the number of seats that will be won by each party in the 150-member Australian House of Representatives.

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Adrián del Río

Humboldt postdoctoral fellow, WZB Berlin Social Science Center.
I received my Ph.D. in Social and Political Science from the European University Institute in May 2020. Currently, I obtained a Humboldt postdoctoral grant to carry out my research at the Institute for East European and International Studies (ZOIS) and Berlin Social Science Centre, Transformation of Democracy research unit.

My research interests include elite politics, authoritarianism, indoctrination, business power, regime change, and other fascinating topics in comparative politics and political economy.

My largest project focuses on divisions within the ruling elite in electoral autocracies -dictatorships that hold multiparty elections. It provides a novel theory, data, and research to explain the strains and disruptions within authoritarian governments as well as defectors’ contribution to regime change.

While I am writing my book manuscript on elite defections in electoral autocracies, I collaborate with two international teams at the University of Oslo and Glasgow in two ERC-funded projects on regime-led indoctrination. I also participate in a project that examines when, why, and how politicians reach law-making agreements, coordinated by the National Distance Education University. see more in my website: www.adelrio.com

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Adrian Dyer

Associate Professor, Monash University
Adrian Dyer is a vision scientist and photographer seeking to understand how the representation of an image is created, and can be used to interpret the complex world in which we live. Research interests centre on understanding how visual systems learn perceptually difficult tasks. This work involves both using human psychophysics and imaging studies, as well as experimenting with how the miniature brain of a bee can form visual representations to make decisions in complex environments.

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Adrian Gepp

Professor of Data Analytics, Bangor University
Adrian Gepp is a Professor of Data Analytics at Bangor Business School, Bangor University, UK. He leads the new undergraduate and postgraduate degree programs in Business Data Analytics offered by Bangor Business School. In his research, Adrian uses advanced statistical modelling and modern data analytics to reveal unique insights about problems of economic and social importance. In addition to his award-winning research in fraud detection, Adrian researches in a wide variety of areas including education, marketing analytics, health analytics, sports analytics and predictive modelling in business and finance. He has over 60 peer-reviewed research outputs. In addition to specialising in industry-funded research projects, his research is published in top international academic journals and has been presented at leading international academic conferences. He is also on the editorial board of multiple international academic journals. Adrian is also a Fellow of the Royal Statistical Society and a member of other accounting and finance societies. As an active member of the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, he has taken roles such as Chapter Vice-President.

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Adrian Hill

Director of the Jenner Institute, University of Oxford
Adrian Hill is a Professor of Human Genetics at the Jenner Institute, University of Oxford. He trained in medicine at Trinity College Dublin and the University of Oxford, qualifying in 1982. He undertook a DPhil with Sir David Weatherall and John Clegg at the MRC Molecular Haematology unit on the molecular population genetics of thalassaemia in Pacific Islanders.

Following further clinical posts in London he returned to the newly opened Institute of Molecular Medicine in 1988 to study genetic susceptibility to malaria as a Wellcome Trust Senior Fellow. In 1995 he was awarded a Wellcome Trust Principal Research Fellowship and in 1996 the title of Professor of Human Genetics.

He participated in the founding of the Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics in 1994, and in 2003 co-founded the Oxford Centre for Clinical Vaccinology and Tropical Medicine, which he now chairs. In 2004 he participated in the restructuring of the Edward Jenner Institute for Vaccine Research and in 2005 was appointed director of the new Jenner Institute. He is a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians, of Magdalen College, Oxford, and of the UK Academy of Medical Sciences.

Research

Dr Hill’s detailed analyses of HLA polymorphism and malaria susceptibility in African children led to an interest in vaccine development, particularly assessing T cell-inducing vaccines against malaria. In murine studies he identified the enhanced T cell immunogenicity of non-replicating poxviruses as boosting agents in vaccination protocols. This led to phase I clinical trials of both DNA and MVA vaccines for malaria starting in 1999. His group showed the first T cell mediated protection of human vaccinees by using DNA-MVA and fowlpox-MVA prime-boost regimes against malaria.

To achieve greater levels of protective efficacy his group is currently developing more immunogenic prime-boost regimes involving recombinant adenoviruses are priming agents and MVA as a boosting agent. This regime has shown excellent immunogenicity in pre-clinical studies in mice and macaques. More immunogenic vectored vaccines are being developed as part of a major grant from the Foundation for NIH and the Gates Foundation addressing one of the Grand Challenge in Global Health. In this work several internal adjuvants have been identified that enhance the immunogenicity of vectored vaccines.

To avoid the problem of anti-vector immunity associated with use of common human serotypes of adenovirus as vaccine vectors, extensive studies of simian adenoviruses have been undertaken. This has led to the identification of a lead simian vector that entered phase I clinical trials in 2007 using the ME-TRAP insert. Studies of correlates of immunity in both vaccinated and challenges volunteers and natural immunity in field studies have identified memory T cells to TRAP as a correlates of immunity in humans and the TRAP antigen has been found to be more immunogenic for T cell induction in clinical trial of vectored vaccines than the circumsporozoite protein.

Detailed studies of blood-stage antigens have shown that vectored vaccines can also induced substantial protection against blood-stage malaria when used in heterologous prime-boost regimes. This protection is mediated by high titre antibodies against the blood-stage as well as T cell immune responses against the liver-stage parasite. Clinical trials of blood-stage antigens in adenovirus and MVA vectors are planned for 2008 to evaluate this new approach.
Prof Hill’s immunogenetics programme currently focuses on genome-wide association studies of bacterial diseases, particularly tuberculosis and pneumococcal disease, and he is a participant in the Wellcome Trust case-control consortium that aims to identify new susceptibility genes using large scale approaches.

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Adrian James

Reader in Police Studies, Liverpool John Moores University
Former Scotland Yard detective, Adrian James, is a Reader in Police Studies at the Centre for Advanced Police Studies, Liverpool John Moores University, UK. During his police career, Adrian led operational detective teams for the UK’s regional and national crime squads. He also performed the role of intelligence manager in the Met’s aviation security (now counter-terrorism) and specialist crime commands. Awarded his doctorate by the London School of Economics for a study into the origins and development of intelligence-led policing, Adrian's publications include a research monograph on the UK’s National Intelligence Model, which commonly is viewed as the template for intelligence-led policing models around the world. He maintains strong links with the policing institution through his research and consultancy work and has completed studies for the for the UK’s College of Policing (‘what works?’ in police intelligence practice), for NPCC (fast-track detective schemes) and the Home Office (financial investigation training and accreditation systems).

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Adrian Lee

Adrian Lee is a Senior Lecturer in the Finance Discipline Group at the University of Technology Sydney. His research interests include asset pricing, individual investors, funds management, real estate and market microstructure.

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Adrian Ma

Assistant Professor, Journalism, Toronto Metropolitan University
Adrian Ma is an award-winning journalist, multimedia producer, professor and author. He specializes in teaching digital news reporting, personal branding and 360/VR storytelling at Ryerson University in Toronto, Canada. He has more than 15 years of professional experience as a writer, editor and content creator and has worked for numerous Canadian news outlets including the CBC and the Toronto Star. He has also written a book about Chinese-Canadian history titled, "How the Chinese Created Canada" (Lone Pine Publishing, 2010).

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Adrian Pokorny

Clinical Associate Lecturer in Medicine, University of Sydney

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Adrian Wayne

Adjunct Senior Research Fellow, The University of Western Australia
Adrian Wayne is a Senior Research Scientist (Forest Fauna Ecology) with Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions (and its predecessor agencies CALM, DEC & DPAW) and has led the Forest Ecology Research Team since 1997.

In 1994 he co-rediscovered the Gilbert’s potoroo - previously thought extinct. Based in Manjimup, Western Australia, he researches the ecology of forest vertebrate fauna (frogs, reptiles and mammals), focusing on work relevant to the conservation and management of threatened and sensitive species.

This has included investigating fauna responses to timber harvesting and prescribed burning, and the ecology of the koomal (common brush-tail possum) and the ngwayir (western ringtail possum) in the jarrah forest, mammal declines with a focus on the woylie, and introduced predator ecology and management. Providing scientific, ecological and biological expertise to biodiversity conservation and management is also an important part of his role

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Adrian Wells

Professor of Clinical and Experimental Psychopathology, University of Manchester
Adrian Wells is Professor of Clinical and Experimental Psychopathology at the University of Manchester and Consultant Clinical Psychologist at GMMH NHS Trust. His research interests are in the field of mental health where is has developed new theories and effective treatments for anxiety disorders, depression and trauma. He is the originator of metacognitive therapy, a novel evidence-based approach that is improving psychological outcomes in mental health and physical heath settings.

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Adrian Williams

Visting Reseach Fellow in Environmental Systems, Cranfield University
Adrian’s career started with research into waste management and progressed into a wide range of experimentally-based agri-environmental research including: biological treatment systems, silage conservation, gaseous emission measurement and control, and improved manure management methods. He later concentrated on mathematical modelling, initially using process models, leading to work in whole-farm agri-environmental and systems modelling, and systems-based, environmental Life Cycle Assessment (LCA).
This addressed subjects from individual food commodity production to changing national diets and the implications for the environment. He also explored, with LCA, the benefits of improving cattle health on GHG emissions and comparing cattle production systems with a range of intensities.
Recent work focussed on the LCA of GHG removal (or net emissions technology – NET), particularly using soil management, along with the valuation of the environmental impacts of scientific activities.

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Adrian J. Scott

Reader, Goldsmiths, University of London
- 2009, MSc in Applied Forensic Psychology (with Distinction), University of Leicester, UK.
- 2004, PhD in Psychology, University of Bath, UK.
- 1999, MSc in Social Research, University of Bath, UK.
- 1998, BSc Honours in Psychology and Sociology (2:1), University of Bath, UK.

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Adriana Craciun

Professor of English and Emma MacLachlan Metcalf Chair of Humanities, Boston University
Adriana Craciun specializes in eighteenth and nineteenth-century British literature and culture, with current research in Arctic humanities, exploration studies, science studies, historical geography, history of collecting, Enlightenment, history of the book and of authorship. Her most recent book, Writing Arctic Disaster: Authorship and Exploration (Cambridge UP, 2016), was shortlisted for the 2016 Kendrick Book Prize by the Society for Literature, Science & the Arts, and uncovers a rich textual and material archive of Arctic exploration culture from the 17th century through to our own era of renewed interest in exploration’s contentious legacies.

She is also the author of Fatal Women of Romanticism (Cambridge UP, 2003) and British Women Writers and the French Revolution: Citizens of the World (Palgrave, 2005), which focused on women writers’ significant contributions to Romantic-era thinking on the body, gender, revolutionary politics, and cosmopolitanism. She is the editor of several essay collections, most recently the volumes Curious Encounters: Voyaging, Collecting and Making Knowledge in the Long 18th Century (2019), and The Material Cultures of Enlightenment Arts and Sciences, co-edited with Simon Schaffer (2016), and the special issue of Eighteenth-Century Studies on The Disorder of Things (2011).

She has published numerous essays in journals such as PMLA, New Literary History, Eighteenth-Century Studies, Nineteenth-Century Literature, European Romantic Review, Atlantic Studies, Victorian Literature and Culture, and Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies. Before coming to BU, Craciun taught at the University of California-Riverside, the University of London, and the University of Nottingham, and has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Arts and Humanities Research Council (UK), the Fulbright Program, and the National Maritime Museum (UK). She is the editor of Studies in Romanticism, the flagship journal of Romantic literary studies founded at BU in 1961.

Current book-length projects include: Arctic Enlightenments, a study of botanical vitality, temporality, and collecting from the Enlightenment to the Svalbard Global Seed Vault; Arctic Mobilities (co-authored with Michael Bravo); The Star Gazers: Astronomy, Poetry and Sexuality in 19th-Century Ireland. She also runs the Cultures of Science interdisciplinary research seminar at BU, and serves on the Executive Board of the Center for the Study of Europe, and as Associated Faculty at the Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future.

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Adriana Domínguez-Oliva

Animal welfare researcher, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana (México)
D.V.M. focused on animal welfare, animal behavior, and neurology. Another field of research is neurobiology and pain assessment in animals.

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Adriana Vergés

Professor in marine ecology, UNSW Sydney
I'm a marine ecologist based at The University of New South Wales in Sydney. My research focuses on the impacts of climate change on marine communities and on developing restoration solutions to re-establish lost underwater kelp forests and seagrass meadows.

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Adrianne Frech

Associate Professor of Population Health, Ohio University
Adrianne Frech is an Associate Professor of Population Health in the Department of Social Medicine at the Ohio University Heritage College of Medicine – Cleveland. Dr. Frech’s research is funded by the National Institutes of Health and her expertise is in the relationships between workforce participation and health across the life course, as she examines how work reflects and reinforces gender inequalities in health.

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Adrienne Macartney

I am researching the process of atmospheric carbon dioxide in the ancient Mars atmosphere being sequestered into stable mineral carbonate. Such carbonate minerals have been observed by satellite, rovers, landers and in meteorites from Mars that have landed on Earth. I examine these sources and attempt to resolve the mineralogy and reaction pathways involved. There is a lot of advanced microscope work of Mars fragments, which I love. I also conduct laboratory experiments in pressure vessels that mimic early Mars hydrothermal systems.

We can utilise the same reactions in rock formations on Earth to store atmospheric carbon dioxide as minerals. A method much more stable than other current carbon capture and storage methods. I am also working with Engineers in Space Glasgow to build a new prototype rover tool that uses ultrasonic grinding to expose a smooth rock surface, so that rock reactions can be observed more clearly.

I write weekly for the Huffington Post and run the public outreach project 'Science Hooker': Check it out.

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Adrienne Wood

Assistant Professor of Psychology, University of Virginia
I am an Assistant Professor of Social Psychology in the Department of Psychology at the University of Virginia, where I run the Emotion and Behavior Lab. My lab studies the dynamic process of building and maintaining social connections at multiple levels of analysis: at the level single interactions, we examine how people use laughter, conversation, and synchrony to connect; at the level of social networks, we examine how people build ties to a community; and at the level of societies, we examine the social consequences of cultural diversity. I earned my PhD in Psychology from the University of Wisconsin - Madison and did my postdoctoral work at Dartmouth College. My research is currently supported by an NSF CAREER Award and a Templeton Foundation grant. I am a proud Kansas Citian and lover of dogs, drawing and oil painting, and piano.

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Adwoa Owusuaa Bobie

Research Fellow, Center for Cultural and African Studies, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST)
Dr. Adwoa Owusuaa Bobie is a researcher with interests in studying Sociology and African studies at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST). Before her appointment at KNUST, she worked for three years as a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Department of Sociology, University of Ghana on the project titled "Advancing Creative Industry for Development in Ghana". This project explored how the Ghanaian creative industry can be enhanced to contribute to national development.

Dr. Bobie obtained her PhD from the University of Basel, Switzerland. Her PhD explored how contemporary Africa fashion designers combine global influence with ethno-cultural factors to produce aesthetic cosmpolitan fashion in Lagos, Nigeria. She argues that, the conscious intersection of the global with the local by African designers, positions African fashion across national borders, emanating in the creation of Aesthetic Cosmopoltanism fashion.

Adwoa obtained her MPhil degree at the University of Ghana from the year 2014 and Bachelor’s at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (Ghana) in 2010. At the MPhil, she worked on “The Youth in the Ghanaian Fashion Industry” which discusses the creativity of young Ghanaian entrepreneurs who are changing the face of fashion with no or little formal training in fashion.

She participated in the first CASB/CODESRIA Summer School programme through which she earned a scholarship with the Fondation Oumou Dilly for her PhD. Adwoa worked as research assistant and also as a freelance research consultant from 2014 to 2016. Major among the projects was “Because I Am a Girl” project funded by Plan International, a United Kingdom based NGO and others funded by Marie Stopes and MasterCard Foundation.

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Afaf Jabiri

Senior Lecturer of Global Development Studies, University of East London
Dr Afaf Jabiri is a Senior Lecturer and the Co-Director of the Centre for Social Justice and Change at the University of East London. Before joining UEL in 2017, she held posts at the Centre for Gender Studies, SOAS, and the Gender Institute at the LSE.

For the past ten years, Dr Jabiri has led and contributed to interdisciplinary research projects, delivered undergraduate and postgraduate teaching in the areas of sociology, international development, gender studies, humanitarianism, postcolonial studies, forced and diaspora studies, supervised and contributed to doctoral training and published academic as well as policy-oriented research.

Dr Jabiri joined academia after 17 years of work on issues related to gender equality, humanitarianism, refugees and migrants’ rights, peace, conflict resolution and transitional justice in the Arab region.

She is a leading feminist activist in Jordan and across the Arab region, advocating for equality and social justice across the region. She publishes in both English and Arabic languages.

RESEARCH
Dr Jabiri’s research combines academic and impact-based research for policy reform and change. She takes an interdisciplinary approach in such studies, linking sociology, history, anthropology, international relations and law in her scholarship. Jabiri’s first book, Gendered Politics of Law in Jordan: Guardianship over Women (2016), examines the state as a gender regime and the historical representation of colonial and neoliberal politics in women’s lived realities of the concept of wilaya (guardianship).

Her recent book-entitled Palestinian Refugees women from Syria to Jordan: Decolonising the Geopolitics of Displacements is based on four years of field research in Palestinian camps in Jordan––and including interviews with Palestinian refugee women, aid workers, and representatives of international organisations and NGOs in Jordan. The book examines the experiences of Palestinian women from Syria displaced to Jordan, embroiled between settler colonialism, militarism, nationalism, global refugee governance, and gender regimes subjecting them to multiple forms of structural, gender-based violence.

To expose the history and geopolitics of intersecting oppressive systems working through and upon Palestinian refugee women's gendered bodies in humanitarian settings, the book argues for feminist analysis of the epistemic, settler- colonial violence of anti-Palestinianism, as well as highlights how local women’s groups and frontline workers attempt to fill service gaps. Using a rich theoretical lens to understand women's experiences in refugee camps, this book attempts to decolonise issues around migration, displacement, refugees, and women.

Dr Jabiri has also undertaken research and developed impact case studies that contributed to both knowledge production and policy reform around development issues related to gender equality, gender-based violence during war and conflict in the context of Libya, Syria, Palestine and Yemen. She contributed to several global interdisciplinary action-oriented research projects related to global inequalities and gender-based violence.

Current research:
Dr Jabiri’s current research involves working on a research project on the Silence and Gender-based Sexual Violence (GBSV) during War and Conflict.

The project aims to offer a comprehensive multi-level, interdisciplinary and gender approach to the understanding of GBSV and the silence around it in six countries: Sudan, Yemen, Iraq, Palestine, Jordan, and Lebanon. This aims to fill the knowledge gap between academic research and policy-based research pertaining to the context in which GBSV and rape occur and the factors that lead to women's silence and lack of reporting or disclosure. The project will establish a network of academic and non-academic members who are experts in different conflict and emergency settings contexts, with a long history and experience of working on the issue of rape and sexual violence in the contexts of Iraq, Palestine, Lebanon, Yemen, and Sudan, in addition to academic institutions from the Global North, Britain, USA and Belgium.

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Afsaneh Razi

Assistant Professor of Information Science, Drexel University
I am an Assistant Professor at the College of Computing and Informatics at Drexel University. I am a Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) researcher who utilizes artificial intelligence to tackle sociotechnical issues using human-centered approaches. My research expertise is positioned at the intersection of HCI, Social Computing, AI/ML, Privacy, and Online Safety. I am passionate about investigating sociotechnical complexities of online harms to design and develop technologies facilitating safer and supportive online interactions, especially for vulnerable populations such as youth.

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Afshan Malik

Reader in Diabetes and Mitochondrial Research, King's College London
I am a molecular biologist with a very keen interest in all things mitochondria. I run a lab in the diabetes dept at King's College London. Our research is focused on the molecular pathways by which oxidative stress induced changes can contribute to diabetic complications and neurodegeneration with a particular interest in the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in this process. Additionally, we are developing methods to measure mitochondrial health and dysfunction in experimental models and humans, and methods to protect mitochondrial health.

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Afshin Jafari

Research fellow, RMIT University

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Afshin Shahi

Associate Professor (Senior Lecturer) in Middle East Politics & International Relations at Keele University, Keele University
Dr Afshin Shahi is an associate professor (senior lecturer ) in Middle East politics and International Relations at Keele University. He obtained both his MA and PhD from the School of Government and International Affairs at Durham University. Prior to joining the School of Social, Political, and Global Studies in 2023, he worked at the universities of Durham, Exeter, and Bradford.

In 2018 he was a visiting research fellow at the European University Institute in Florence. His research interests encompass Iranian politics, climate change and conflict, sectarianism, and political Islam in the Middle East. His articles have appeared in scholarly outlets including the Middle East Journal, the British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies, and the Journal of the Royal Society for Asian Affairs.

He is the author of the Politics of Truth Management in Saudi Arabia (Routledge, 2013) and the co-author of a forthcoming book, Iran: the Shia State and the Sunni Minority. He has been part of various editorial boards and for about four years he was an associate editor of the British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies. He is a regular contributor to national and global media outlets including the BBC and Aljazeera. His opinion pieces have appeared in various publications including Forbes magazine, Foreign Policy magazine, and the Conversation. He also actively works with both practitioners and stakeholders in his field. In 2017, he was a recipient of the Vice Chancellor’s Award for Outstanding Achievement at the University of Bradford.

His research interests include Middle East politics & security, political Islam and religious sectarianism. He is the author of 'The Politics of Truth Management in Saudi Arabia' and a number of peer-reviewed articles. He has contributed to international media outlets including, Al Jazeera, Washington Post, Bloomberg Business, the Telegraph, National Public Radio (US) ITV, Sky News and the BBC.

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Agatha A. van der Klaauw

Clinical Lecturer in Metabolic Medicine, University of Cambridge
I am a Clinical Lecturer in Metabolic Medicine at the University of Cambridge. My research aims to understand the consequences of obesity on hormone regulation and immune function to improve treatment for people living with obesity.

Obesity leads to more frequent and severe infections, which became poignantly visible during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, immune dysfunction in obesity is poorly understood and understudied. Treatment and clinical outcomes of (severe) infections in people with obesity may be improved by understanding the underlying processes that drive immune dysfunction.

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Agelos Delis

Lecturer in Economics, Aston University

I joined Aston Business School in September 2011, having spent the previous two years as Visiting Lecturer at the University of Cyprus. Prior to that, I was for two and a half years Research Fellow at the University of Nottingham.

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Agnès Maillot

Associate Professor, School of Applied Languages and Intercultural Studies, Dublin City University
My main area of research is the conflict in Northern Ireland, and more particularly Sinn Féin and the IRA, on which I have published many books and articles. I also work on post-conflict politics, covering areas such as victims and reconciliation, the legacy of violence,
I also research contemporary Irish society, as well as multiculturalismalism in France and Ireland, and am I currently working on issues of asylum seekers in the French and Irish contexts.

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Agus Wicaksana

PhD Candidate in Operations and Supply Chain Management, The University of Melbourne

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