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Philip Slavin

Associate Professor of History, University of Stirling
I was born in St Petersburg, Russia and began my university career at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, where I pursued two concurrent degrees in History and Violin Performance. I received my PhD in Medieval History from the Centre for Medieval Studies at the University of Toronto (2008). Before joining Stirling in 2018, I spent two years as a postdoctoral fellow at the Economic Growth Center, at Yale University (2008-10), three years as a Mellon Fellow and faculty lecturer at McGill University, Montreal (2010-3) and five years as a lecturer and then senior lecturer at the University of Kent (2013-8).

When outside a classroom or his office, I enjoy listening to and playing music (be it Classical, Jazz, Rock or Folk), tasting ales and whiskies (the more obscure the better), cooking, and hiking (the further away from 'Civilization' the better). I love languages and have always been attracted to their beauty, written or spoken.

My scientific creed and research interests

Rather than seeing myself as an historian in the ‘traditional’ sense, I view myself as a ‘scientist of the past’, trained to work across disciplines and collaborate with colleagues in sciences, to promote a unified knowledge and science of the past. In my research, I use historical knowledge as a powerful tool to understand some of the most important issues and challenges that the human race and its wider bio-ecological environment face today.

My principle research interests fall into two main categories. Firstly, I am interested in the history of natural environment, economy, health, and society of the late-medieval world, with a particular focus on the British Isles within the wider North Atlantic context, and Central Asia within the wider Eurasian context. My first monograph Bread and Ale for the Brethren: The Provisioning of Norwich Cathedral Priory, c.1260-1536 (2012) offers a re-interpretation of the decline of feudal system in England, through the prism of food production and consumption by local landlords. My second monograph Experiencing Famine: A Fourteenth-Century Environmental Shock in the British Isles , recently published with Brepols, examines the Great European Famine of 1315-17 (arguably the single worst subsistence crisis in Europe in the last two millennia) as a case-study to answer the most pressing question ‘What creates famine?’ In addition, I have authored (and in some cases co-authored) 34 articles on various topics related to environmental, economic and social history of late-medieval world.

Secondly, in recent years I have expanded my interests in these topics to a global ‘deep history’ perspective, all the way from early hunters-gatherers to our contemporary world. These topics are among the most pressing and complex socio-economic, environmental and political issues that scientists, NGOs and policy makers are struggling with today. Before these issues can be solved, we need a better understanding of their determinants and dynamics in a long-run historical context. I am currently working on two large-scale monograph projects. The one will examine the historical roots of global economic inequality, in a very long run. It argues that we cannot fully appreciate the phenomenon of global economic inequality, unless we study the development of socio-economic and cultural institutions from a ‘deep history’ perspective, which follows this development from early hunter-gatherer societies to our contemporary world. The other monograph is a global history of the single most notorious killer: plague - all the way from the Late Neolithic Period until sporadic outbreaks in the 21st century. This book, too, takes a deep history perspective, to answer some most pressing questions related to the phenomenon of ‘emerging diseases’, such as ‘What makes some diseases so deadly?’ ‘What is the relationship between emerging diseases and a wider bio-ecological and climatic environment?’ ‘What makes those diseases fade and disappear – or, by contrast – re-emerge again?’

I welcome enquiries from prospective research students interested in the environmental, economic, social and medical history of late-medieval and early modern British Isles and other parts of the European and North Atlantic world.

Publications

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Philip Wiseman

Research Fellow, Astronomy, University of Southampton
I research the most extreme events in the Universe: exploding stars (supernovae) and giant flares from super-massive black holes. I am an expert in using a particular type of exploding star, known as a "type Ia supernova", to measure distances in the Universe. We can use these to infer the expansion history of the Universe and understand what it is made of.
In 2023 I led the discovery and analysis of the largest cosmic explosion ever detected, AT2021lwx, which was 10 times brighter than any known exploding star. We believe that the extreme luminosity was caused by huge amounts of gas from a giant cloud falling onto a super-massive black hole.

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Philip A. Goduti, Jr.

Adjunct Assistant Professor of History, Quinnipiac University
Philip Goduti, Jr. earned his BA in history from Quinnipiac University in 1997 with a minor in English. He went on to earn a Master of Arts in History from Providence College in 1998 meeting his wife Alyssa. Goduti moved to Hamden, CT to work at Quinnipiac University full time as a Residence Hall Director. It was during that time he started teaching history for the university, eventually going on to earn another Master of Arts in history at the University of Connecticut in 2005. His master’s thesis, directed by Dr. Frank Costigliola, was entitled “To Khrushchev, With Love: Kennedy’s Soviet Policy, 1961” and would eventually serve for the first six chapters of his book Kennedy’s Kitchen Cabinet and the Pursuit of Peace: The Shaping of American Foreign Policy, 1961-1963, published by McFarland and Co., Inc. in 2009.

Goduti continues to teach at Quinnipiac University and also teaches history full-time at Somers High School where he was the 2017 Somers Public Schools Teacher of the Year and the 2020 Daughters of the American Revolution Connecticut Outstanding Teacher of American History.

Goduti's second book, Robert F. Kennedy and the Shaping of Civil Rights, 1960-1964, was published in 2013 by McFarland and Co., Inc. He has also contributed to American National Biography Online, which is published by Oxford University Press. His most recent book, RFK and MLK: Visions of Hope, 1963-1968, was published in 2017 by McFarland and Co., Inc.

Goduti recently finished his Ph.D. in history from the University of Connecticut. Under the direction of Dr. Frank Costigliola, his dissertation, titled "'The Durability of a Kennedy': How Emotional Communities Contributed to John F. Kennedy's Core Beliefs, 1930-1963," examines the evolution of John F. Kennedy's core beliefs as he inhabited four emotional communities throughout his life that included his family, education at Choate and Harvard, the Navy, and his time in public office. It investigates how those core beliefs helped shape Kennedy's foreign policy decisions while President of the United States.

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Philip D Parker

Pro-vice-chancellor Research, Australian Catholic University
Professor Philip Parker is the Pro-vice-chancellor - Research at the Australian Catholic University. He received
his doctorate in educational psychology from the University of Sydney. His major
research interest includes educational inequality, developmental transitions, and educational
attainment.

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Philip J Atherton

Professor of Clinical, Metabolic & Molecular Physiology, University of Nottingham
Despite my relatively early career stage, I have been PI or Co-I on successful project grants from UK research councils (MRC, BBSRC), Eurpoean Union (EUFP7), charity (Dunhill Medical Trust) and industrial (Ajinomoto, Abbott Nutrition) sources to the tune of ~£10M. I have published ~80 peer-reviewed articles (H-index 33) and 4 book chapters and my work has placed me in the world's top 5% of cited authors for work in Biology & Biochemistry (source: Thomson Reuters). I have received prestigious early career awards (e.g. American Physiological Society New investigator 2010) and am regularly invited to speak at national (e.g. Physiological Society) and international (e.g. EB, ECSS, ASPEN, ICAAP, A/ESPEN) conferences.

Research synopsis: My past work has focused on the identification of central mechanisms regulating metabolism in human musculoskeletal tissues, and where appropriate, using more tractable in vitro cell or where appropriate, in vivo animal models. Combining molecular biology, stable isotope methodologies and detailed in vivo human physiology, I have been a key part of a team that has discovered a number of fundamental parameters that govern alterations in protein metabolism with age and disease. In particular, I have led the molecular analysis in the majority of my publications and over more recent years in becoming laboratory Principal Investigator, been entirely responsible for grant income, research direction and development of state-of-the-art physiological experiments. The current direction of our laboratories work involves the combining of detailed molecular physiology with the application of carbon/ deuterium stable isotope methodologies and more recently, the integration of OMIC (genomic/ metabolomic) techniques to discover predictors of, and the basis for, musculoskeletal decline in ageing and disease.

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Philip J. Lazarus

Associate Professor, Counseling, Recreation and School Psychology, Florida International University
Lazarus has served as the Director of the School Psychology Program at Florida International University for over 40 years and his primary responsibility is to train school psychologists to work in the schools. He is currently the internship coordinator. He is the author or editor of four books including: Psycho-educational Evaluation of Children and Adolescents with Low-Incidence Handicaps; Best Practices in School Crisis Prevention and Intervention; Creating Safe and Supportive Schools and Fostering Students’ Mental Health and Fostering the Emotional Well-Being of Youth: A School-Based Approach. He has served as the President of the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) and the Florida Association of School Psychologists (FASP). He is licensed as both a psychologist and school psychologist in the state of Florida. Lazarus is a founder and Past- Chairperson of the National Emergency Assistance Team of the NASP. This team has provided direct crisis assistance in the aftermath of more than a dozen tragic school shootings. He led the NASP crisis response in Mississippi and Louisiana where he provided crisis intervention training in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina and Rita and he also led the team in the Gulf Coast in the response to the gulf oil spill disaster. He has also maintained a private practice for over 30 years. He specializes in working with children, adolescents and families. His practice encompasses assessment, therapy and consultation with troubled youth and their families. Lazarus has dealt with schools and communities that have been involved with trauma such and loss of life and has provided therapy and assessment following bus accidents impacting two communities in both Florida and Texas. He consulted with the Federal Bureau of Investigation in their landmark study on profiling school shooters and has worked on school violence prevention and bullying prevention for National Catholic Risk Retention Group, Inc and VIRTUS®. Dr. Lazarus has been interviewed by a number of news sources such as the CNBC, CNN, the Glenn Beck Show, Newsweek, Seventeen Magazine, Washington Post, Reader’s Digest, and has appeared on numerous radio talk shows dealing with such topics as depression in children, anxiety in children and adolescents, responding to natural disasters, coping with trauma following school shootings, school violence, helping children deal with grief and trauma following 9-11, bullying in schools, threat assessment, and identifying troubled students.

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Philip Kofi Adom

Associate Professor, School of Economics and Finance, University of the Witwatersrand
Associate Professor Philip Kofi Adom holds a PhD in economics from the Swedish University of Agriculture Sciences. His research interest is in energy and environmental economics. This includes energy finance, demand and supply modelling, pricing modelling, energy transitions, energy efficiency, energy poverty, renewable energy, economics of wastewater and environmental pollution, climate change economics, and water use efficiency.

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Philip Nti Nkrumah

Researcher, Sustainable Minerals Institute, The University of Queensland
Dr Philip Nti Nkrumah is a postdoctoral research fellow at the Centre for Mined Land Rehabilitation (CMLR). His research primarily focuses on the biogeochemistry of trace elements (manganese, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, palladium and platinum) in soil-hyperaccumulator plants systems. Philip has made significant advances in knowledge in the field, including pioneering work on tropical nickel phytomining at a field-scale in Malaysia, providing a full-scale demonstration of the technology in the Asia-Pacific Region. Philip has published the outcomes of his research in leading journals, including Scientific Reports, Plant and Soil, and the Journal of Geochemical Exploration. As of August 2019, Philip has 272 citations from his 30 publications and an h-index of 9 (citation data from Google Scholar).

Philip has project managed a number of industry-funded research projects on rare metallophyte plants. He is currently working on a project ‘Metallophyte plant species and ecotypes at Dugald River - A forgotten resource’ that is being funded by MMG Australia Limited (2018– 2019). He received the prestigious award of ‘UQ Early Career Researcher Grant’ to support his innovative research activities at UQ (January–December 2019). He also won the Sustainable Minerals Institute’s Excellence Award, which allowed him to undertake research in South Africa. These opportunities have enabled him to build expertise and facilities that forms the foundation of his research career.

Apart from his primary research activities (including PhD student mentorship) at CMLR, Philip is also a coordinator and lecturer of the course Environmental Management in Mining at the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences at UQ.

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Philip-Neri Jayson-Quashigah

Research Fellow, University of Ghana
Philip-Neri is a research fellow at the Institute for Environment and Sanitation Studies, University of Ghana. His research focuses on nearshore coastal processes including coastal erosion and sargassum beaching with the application of remote sensing/GIS and numerical modelling.

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Philipp Schneider

Doctoral Student, EPFL – École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne – Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne
Philipp Schneider is a PhD student at the College of Management of Technology. As a Fulbright scholar, he holds M.Sc. degrees in Engineering & Technology Innovation Management and Mechanical Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University. In addition, he holds an undergraduate degree from Hamburg University of Applied Sciences as a corporate student of Airbus. From 2019 to 2020 he worked as Senior Data Scientist at EY in New York City. Philipp’s current work focuses on leveraging data, optimization, and machine learning, to solve practical problems that matter to society.

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Philipp Winter

Postdoctoral Research Associate in Computer Science, Princeton University

I am interested in computer networks and security, and why the two don't get along very well. I enjoy being part of all phases of a research project—from sketching ideas on a whiteboard, to implementation, and finally deployment and maintenance. To this end, I have worked in the three research areas listed below. I keep maintaining code I have developed in these research projects, so they are open-ended in some sense.

Keeping bad actors out of the Tor network
As communities grow in size, it becomes increasingly hard to keep out bad actors, and Tor is no exception because the network is run by volunteers. In 2013, I started developing exitmap, a fast and flexible scanner for Tor exit relays. If you have a background in functional programming, think about it as a map() interface for Tor exit relays. It allows you to run arbitrary, TCP-based tests over each exit relay. One of the main tasks of exitmap is to expose and block malicious and misbehaving exit relays. I recently broadened my scope to Sybil relays, sets of Tor relays that are under the control of a single entity. I am developing sybilhunter which is meant to assist in finding and analysing Sybils.

Censorship analysis
Early on in my Ph.D. studies, I became interested in the Great Firewall of China (GFW). I was first exposed to the GFW in 2011, when trying to understand how it blocks the Tor network. I have since revisited the topic several times, to understand how the GFW fails over space and time, and how its active probing component is designed. As part of my work on the Tor network, I also helped characterise—and circumvent—a censorship system in Ethiopia.

Traffic obfuscation
Motivated by my work on censorship systems, I became interested in traffic obfuscation, i.e., shaping network traffic in a way that it is hard to classify and block. I started by developing a small tool for server-side circumvention. It was designed to prevent the GFW from recognising Tor handshakes on the wire. The tool transparently rewrites the window size in a SYN-ACK segment, forcing the client to split its initial payload across two segment instead of one. Back in 2012, the GFW would not reassemble TCP streams, rendering it unable to spot circumvention traffic “protected” by this tool. I then went on and developed ScrambleSuit, a polymorphic traffic obfuscation protocol. ScrambleSuit can protect against the GFW's active probing attacks by relying on a “password” that is shared between client and server. ScrambleSuit has since been superseded by the faster and more elegant obfs4, which is no longer maintained by me.

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Philippa Byrne

I am currently a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow at Somerville College, University of Oxford, where I now research the interaction between Arabic, Greek and Latin thought in medieval law, with a particular concentration on the twelfth and thirteenth centuries.

I completed by DPhil in 2014, at the University of Oxford, on the topic of the relationship between theology, scholastic thought and the early English common law.

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Philippa Ryan

Dr Ryan's area of expertise is commercial equity, in particular the liability of third parties to a breach of trust. Her PhD formulated a new classification for Barnes v Addy liability. Her current research explores breach of fiduciary duty in apparently trustless commercial relationships and self-executing contracts, usually enabled by Blockchain technology. Dr Ryan designed and coordinates a commercial equity elective that examines directors’ duties, Ponzi schemes and the trust as an alternative to a corporate arrangement. Her teaching research investigates how authentic legal processes can improve law students' problem-solving. In conjunction with the UTS Connected Intelligence Centre, she is piloting the use of discourse analytics software to improve law students' legal writing skills.

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Philippe Brunet

Directeur de recherches CNRS, Docteur en physique, HdR, Université Paris Cité
Physique des liquides, énergie, acoustique, matériaux,

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Philippe Burger

Professor of Economics and Head of Department, University of the Free State
Philippe Burger is a 2016/17 Fulbright Exchange Scholar at Columbia University, working on the unemployment problem in South Africa. He is Professor of Economics and Head of Department at the University of the Free State. From September 2012 to October 2014 he was President of the Economic Society of South Africa. He is also a member of the South African Statistics Council, which overseas the work of Statistics South Africa. His publications include three books and numerous academic articles on fiscal rules and fiscal sustainability, public private partnerships and macroeconomic policy. Together with IMF staff he also co-authored two IMF working papers. In 2009 the IMF also invited him to spend a month at the IMF as a visiting scholar. In 2007, 2010 and 2012 he was seconded to the OECD in Paris to work on public private partnerships and capital budgeting, while in October 2011 he joined an OECD mission to Indonesia to conduct a regulatory review of Indonesia. He was a member of the Panel of Experts of the South African National Treasury, in which capacity he recently co-authored a 20-year review of South African fiscal policy since 1994.

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Philippe de Donato

Directeur de recherche au CNRS, Université de Lorraine
Mon activité scientifique se place dans la politique de transition énergétique, animée par trois tendances majeures : les sciences de la terre, le développement durable et les impacts environnementaux. Cette activité concerne principalement les enveloppes superficielles naturelles ou anthropisées avec comme finalité leur éco-utilisation dans la problématique de transition énergétique en lien avec leurs protections durables. Les recherches entreprises se focalisent sur l’étude des mécanismes de transfert et d’interaction des fluides dans l’écosphère. La porte d’entrée dans tous ces systèmes se situe au niveau moléculaire (nm). Cette approche, nécessairement multi échelle, s’articule autour de trois axes de progrès principaux :
- développer une métrologie d’observation et de quantification du transfert des fluides en milieux naturels, pouvant intégrer les trois compartiments : géosphère (-3000, 0m), biosphère (0, 10m) et troposphère (10, 10 000m)
- comprendre les mécanismes d’interaction fluides - solides et leurs transports dans les différents compartiments affectés,
- interpréter ces phénomènes d’interactions et de transfert en termes de modèles 2D/3D d’échange intra et inter compartiments.
Ces recherches trouvent naturellement leurs applications dans le domaine de l’utilisation pérenne et responsable du sol et du sous à des finalités énergétiques à savoir : l’exploitation des ressources minérales, la gestion des rejets miniers, le stockage géologique profond de déchets ultimes et le stockage en milieu géologique du CO2, de l’énergie (H2) et la surveillance et la sécurisation de sites émissifs qu’ils soient naturels, urbains, industriels, militaires ou évènementiels.

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Philippe Huneman

Directeur de recherche CNRS, Institut d'histoire et de philosophie des sciences et des techniques, Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne
Directeur de recherche l'Institut d'histoire et de philosophie des sciences et des techniques (CNRS), Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne.
Formé d’abord en mathématiques, il s'est spécialisé dans la philosophie de la biologie, en particulier évolutive, et de l'écologie. Il a écrit de nombreux articles sur des questions relatives au concept d'organisme, à la sélection naturelle, l'écologie théorique ou aux modalités de l'explication biologique, et il a entre autres publié "Métaphysique et biologie. Kant et la constitution du concept d'organisme" (Kimé, 2008), "Pourquoi? Une question pour découvrir le monde." (Flammarion/Autrement 2020)
et codirigé "From groups to individuals" (avec Frédéric Bouchard; MIT Press 2013), "Les Mondes Darwiniens" (avec Thomas Heams, Guillaume Lecointre, Marc Silberstein; Matériologiques, 2011), "Challenging the Modern Synthesis" (Oxford University Press, 2017) avec Denis Walsh, et “Temps de la nature, nature du temps“ (CNRS Ed ) avec Christophe Bouton.
Publications disponible sur http://philippehuneman.wordpress.com
Responsable de de l'équipe "Philosophie de la biologie et de la médecine“ de l'IHPST, et du GDR CNRS Sapienv "les savoirs de l'environnement", il dirige actuellement le projet ANR-DFG "Generalizing Darwinism“ avec Thomas Reydon (Hanovre) , et prépare un livre sur le scientisme et un autre sur ce qu'il nomme "les sociétés du profilage".

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Philippe Quirion

Directeur de recherche, économie, Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS)
Chercheur au CNRS depuis 2004
HDR de l’EHESS, 2011
Thèse de l’École des Mines de Paris, 1999
Publications : https://scholar.google.fr/citations?hl=fr&user=BN9i2acAAAAJ&view_op=list_works&sortby=pubdate

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Philippe M. Frowd

Associate professor, L’Université d’Ottawa/University of Ottawa
Philippe M. Frowd is Associate Professor at the School of Political Studies, University of Ottawa, Canada. His research focuses on borders and migration, critical security studies and African politics. As part of a multi-faceted research trajectory, he has also come to research and write on issues related to the politics of surveillance and privacy for diverse audiences.

His current research focuses on the transnational governance of security, with a particular emphasis on border control and migration management technologies and policies.

He is working on two parallel projects. The first focuses on the automation/digitisation of border security in Canada through electronic visas, applications and airport kiosks. The second concerns intervention policy in and around the G5 Sahel and its place in the evolving security architecture of West Africa.

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Philippe Van Cappellen

Professor of Biogeochemistry and Canada Excellence Research Chair Laureate in Ecohydrology, University of Waterloo
I joined the University of Waterloo as the Canada Excellence Research Chair in Ecohydrology in 2011. Previously, I was a Professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology and at Utrecht University. My research combines laboratory studies with field observations and theoretical developments to understand and model the processes that regulate water chemistry, carbon and nutrient cycling, microbial activity, and mineral transformations – in agricultural and urban landscapes, lentic and lotic systems, and coastal marine environments. My work further includes the detection and environmental fate and transport of trace contaminants (metals, metalloids, hydrocarbons, microplastics, nanomaterials), the calibration of geochemical (paleo)proxies, and the development of new water quality sensors. I also uses remote sensing data time series and regional climate projections to forecast future changes in lake and soil biogeochemistry

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Phillip Dawson

Professor and Co-Director, Centre for Research in Assessment and Digital Learning, Deakin University
Professor Phillip (Phill) Dawson is the Co-Director of the Centre for Research in Assessment and Digital Learning (CRADLE) at Deakin University. He researches assessment in higher education, with a focus on feedback, artificial intelligence, cheating and integrity. His two latest books are 'Defending Assessment Security in a Digital World: Preventing E-Cheating and Supporting Academic Integrity in Higher Education' (Routledge, 2021) and the co-edited volume 'Re-imagining University Assessment in a Digital World' (Springer, 2020).

Prof Dawson holds a PhD in Higher Education and a first-class honours degree in Computer Science. He has more than 20 years of experience working in Australian higher education, and he has been awarded four university-level teaching awards and a citation from the Australian Learning and Teaching Council. He has led major higher education research projects funded by the Australian Research Council, the Office for Learning and Teaching, and a variety of educational technology companies.

Phill is a regular contributor to public debate on higher education. His work has been featured on ABC TV, The Australian, The Age, Times Higher Education, the BBC, VICE, Vox, the Financial Times, the Geelong Advertiser, and discussed in the Australian parliament. In his spare time, Phill performs comedy, including in the academia-themed improv show The Peer Revue, which he also produces.

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Phillip McGarry

Ph.D. Candidate in Experimental Psychology, University of Tennessee
Phillip P. McGarry is a Ph.D. candidate in experimental psychology and graduate fellow at the University of Tennessee. His research interests include political polarization, motivation and moral psychology.

Notable publications include (with P. J. Hampson & T. L. Hulsey), “Moral Affordance, Moral Expertise, and Virtue” in Theory and Psychology (2021) and (with R. F. Corwyn), “An Expectancy Value Theory Predicts Achievement in Undergraduate Statistics Through Academic Delay of Gratification” in Statistics Education Research Journal (2020).

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Phillip O'Neill

Professor Phillip O’Neill is Director of the Centre for Western Sydney at Western Sydney University. Previously he was Foundation Director of the Urban Research Centre at WSU, and Director of the Centre for Urban and Regional Studies at the University of Newcastle.

Phillip is a widely published international scholar with expertise relating to economic and industrial change especially in large cities.

He had held visiting research fellowships at Bristol University, The University of Massachusetts, the National University of Singapore, the University of Oxford and University College London. Phillip was Editor-in-Chief of the journal Geographical Research 2010-14. He sits on the editorial boards of a number of leading international journals and is a member of the advisory board of iBuild, a leading UK infrastructure research venture.

Phillip has held six prestigious Australian Research Council grants including his current grants which investigate Australia’s obstinate infrastructure problems and international infrastructure financing trends.

Phillip writes regular columns for the Fairfax regional and community press and is a prominent media commentator.

In recent times he has completed a 25 year outlook study of employment for Western Sydney, an investigation of mortgage distress in significantly affected Western Sydney neighbourhoods, a detailed audit of Sydney’s threatened agricultural lands, and a path-breaking analysis of Sydney's fresh fruit and vegetable supply chains.

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Phillip Wild

Senior Research Fellow, CAEEPR, Griffith University
Dr Phillip Wild has a PhD from the University of Queensland specialising in the field of macro-economic modelling. His main area of research since 2009 has been in Energy Economics with a particular focus on wholesale electricity market modelling of the Australian National Electricity Market (NEM), integration of variable renewables (e.g. wind, solar PV, hybrid gas-solar thermal), levelized cost modelling, the role that renewable hydrogen might play in decarbonisation pathways and network balancing, energy policy issues linked to these research topics, agent based modelling and econometric modelling of National Energy Market (NEM) spot price and load time series data.

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Phiona Stanley

Associate Professor of Intercultural Communications (Tourism and Languages), Edinburgh Napier University
Phiona Stanley has degrees from the University of Edinburgh (MA Honours in Politics, 1994), the University of Sydney (MEd, 2006), and Monash University (PhD, 2010); in addition, she has vocational qualifications in TESOL --RSA Cert (1993) and RSA Dip (1997)-- and the DELE Superiór in Spanish (2002). She currently works as Associate Professor of Intercultural Business Communication at Edinburgh Napier University in Scotland.

Phiona's academic publishing includes five Routledge books on topics including: Westerners teaching English in China, backpackers learning Spanish and engaging in volunteer work/staying in homestays in Latin America, and the gendered cultural pressures women experience to 'fit in' socially, even now. Methodologically, she has contributed to autoethnography, editing two books on the research method's intersections with culture/the intercultural. She has also published around 40 peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters.

Thematically, Phiona's work is all about mobilities and about the 'intercultural' in its broadest sense: complex comings and goings of humans, non-humans, and objects in specific times and places. Within a broad focus on how cultures operate, she is particularly interested in gender, embodiment, and other normative 'rules', and in the tensions between conventionality and singularity. This has required an ambitious traversing of disciplinary boundaries and innovative cross-pollination of theory.

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Phoebe Friesen

Assistant Professor, Biomedical Ethics, McGill University
Phoebe Friesen is a philosopher and medical ethicist working at McGill University. She thinks about ethical and epistemic issues related to the production and implementation of knowledge in the health sciences, drawing on feminist philosophy of science, ethics scholarship, and methodologies from the social sciences.

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Phoebe Hart

Associate Professor, Film Screen & Animation, Queensland University of Technology
Dr Phoebe Hart is a writer, director and producer of documentaries, factual content and children’s television, an associate professor in film, screen and animation at the Queensland University of Technology, and principal of Hartflicker, a video and film production company. She is known particularly for her autobiographical road trip movie, Orchids: My Intersex Adventure. Her book Crafting Contemporary Documentaries and Docuseries for Global Screens: Documania (2024) is published by an imprint of Rowman & Littleford.

Phoebe has worked with many production companies and television networks, including Network Ten, Wildbear Entertainment, Freshwater Pictures, Vizible Entertainment, Octagon CSI, Beyond, Turner Entertainment Inc., Brisbane International Film Festival and Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Her work has been broadcast on Showtime, ARTE, Special Broadcasting Station, Nine Network, Schweizer Fernsehen, Televisión Española, UR (Swedish Educational Broadcasting Company), DBS Israel, OUTtv, Stan and ArtMedia.

In 2009 Hart was awarded her doctorate from Queensland University of Technology, of which Orchids was a central element of her doctoral studies. This documentary took six years for the principal documenters (sisters Phoebe and Bonnie Hart) to film, using a variety of cameras including semi-professional digital cameras, domestic VHS camcorders, and Super 8.

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Phoebe Runciman

Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Institute of Sport and Exercise Medicine, Stellenbosch University

Phoebe Runciman is currently a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Institute of Sport and Exercise Medicine, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town. She was awarded her PhD in Exercise Science from the University of Cape Town, after completing her undergraduate degree in Sport Science and her Honours degree in Biokinetics. Her primary research focusses on individuals with disability, including performance, fatigue and exercise pacing strategies of elite athletes with cerebral palsy, brain regulation and muscle activity during exercise, functional capacity and biomechanics of lower limb amputees using bionic or mechanical knee and ankle prostheses, as well as epidemiology of injury and illness of athletes with disability at major sporting competitions (Summer and Winter Paralympic Games).

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Phoebe V Moore

Professor of Management and the Futures of Work at the Essex School of Business, University of Essex
I am an internationally regarded scholar writing about technology and work, with a focus on quantified work and worker struggle. I write about artificial intelligence and its discontents; occupational safety and health and digitalisation; psychosocial pressures and the limits of algorithmic management.

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Phyllis Awor

Lecturer in Public Health, Makerere University
I am a medical doctor (MBChB) with also an MSc. in International Health and a PhD in International Health

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Pierluigi Mancarella

Chair Professor of Electrical Power Systems, The University of Melbourne
Pierluigi Mancarella is the Chair Professor of Electrical Power Systems at the University of Melbourne, Australia, and Professor of Smart Energy Systems at the University of Manchester, UK. His key research interests include techno-economic modelling and analysis of multi-energy systems, grid integration of renewables and distributed energy resources, energy infrastructure planning under uncertainty, and security, reliability, and resilience of low-carbon networks.

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Piero S. Colla

Chargé de cours à l’université de Strasbourg, laboratoire « Mondes germaniques et nord-européens », Université de Strasbourg
Historian, Sociologist

Ph D at the EHESS Paris

Member of the Advisory consultative committee of the Council of Europe's Observatory on History Teaching

Official at the European Economic and Social Committee (Brussels)

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Pierre Failler

Professor in Economics and Director of the Centre for Blue Governance, UNESCO Chair in Ocean Governance, University of Portsmouth
Prof. Failler is the director of the Centre for Blue Governance. He holds the Unesco Chair in Ocean Governance. He has coordinated complex research projects with multidisciplinary teams for more than 25 years in Europe, Africa, Asia, Caribbean, and Pacific coastal countries (more than 40 to date) in collaboration with national research institutions and universities and a close link with policy bodies. He has recently coordinated the Blue Economy Strategy for the African Union, the Regional Action Plan for the Blue Economy of the Indian Ocean Commission, the Blue Economy Strategy of the Intergovernmental Authority for Development as well as the Blue Economy Strategy for Bangladesh, Seychelles, Guinea, The Bahamas, Jamaica, Madagascar and Tanzania. He has authored and co-authored about 160 journal articles and 350 book chapters, research reports, consultancy reports, etc. He is also a scientific evaluator for several research councils in the UK, Europe, North America, Africa, and Asia.

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Pierre Micheletti

Responsable du diplôme «Santé -- Solidarité -- Précarité» à la Faculté de médecine de Grenoble, Université Grenoble Alpes (UGA)
Médecin, diplômé de l’Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Santé Publique.

Ill entreprend ses premières expériences à l’étranger en 1985. Sa thèse de médecine (1986) porte sur « La politique de l’enfant unique en République Populaire de Chine », à l’occasion d’un séjour au « Sichuan Medical College » de Cheng Du.
Il rejoint Médecins du Monde (MDM)en 1987 comme chef de mission au Guatemala. Il devient le directeur des programmes de MDM en 1996, puis sera élu à la présidence de 2006 à 2009.
De 2008 à 2020 il enseigne à l’Institut d’Etudes politiques de Grenoble où il codirige le master « Politiques et Pratiques des Organisations Internationales ».
Il est l’auteur de nombreux articles dans la presse écrite nationale.

Autres fonctions occupées dans le champ de la santé :
• Directeur de la santé de la ville de Grenoble (2000-2008)
• Conseiller technique et membre du Directoire de l’hôpital psychiatrique de St Egrève (2009-2014)
• Président de l’Association des Centres de Santé (Agecsa)(2009-2014)
• Vice-président de la Fédération Nationale des Centres de Santé (2010-2012)
• Président de la Commission santé et membre du Conseil d’Administration de l’Uniopss (2012-2016)
• Membre du Conseil National de la santé mentale (2014-2016)

Dernier ouvrage paru : « 0,03 % : pour une transformation de l'aide humanitaire internationale », éditions Parole, septembre 2020.

http://pierremicheletti.parolesautourdunlivre.fr

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Pierre Rognon

Associate Professor, University of Sydney
Pierre Rognon is Associate Professor at the School of Civil Engineering, the University of Sydney.
His research focuses of the mechanical behaviour of granular matter such as sands, soils, ores and grains and its many applications in geomechanics and engineering.

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