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Patrick Stokes

I'm a philosopher at Deakin University, and have previously held research fellowships in the UK (I'm an honorary Research Fellow at the University of Hertfordshire), Denmark and the US.

My areas of research include personal identity, philosophy of death and remembrance, 19th and 20th century European philosophy (especially the work of Søren Kierkegaard) and moral psychology.

As well as The Conversation, I'm a regular contributor to New Philosopher and pop up from time to time on The Drum, 774 Melbourne, 3RRR, Radio National, The Age, and other places.

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Patrick Sullivan1

Professor, University of Notre Dame Australia
I am a political anthropologist whose work for Aboriginal organisations since the early 1980s involves practical research and advice on issues of land use and distribution, community control of community development, and governance institutions at the local and regional levels. For two separate periods I was the Senior Anthropologist for the Kimberley Land Council, formulating anthropological and policy advice on local, national and international projects, as well as native title cases. From 2002 to 2012 I was a Research Fellow, and Senior Research Fellow, in Indigenous Regional Organisation, Governance and Public Policy at the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies. I concentrated my research on public policy approaches to Indigenous affairs. I have authored numerous scholarly articles and practical reports, and the book Belonging Together: Dealing with the Politics of Disenchantment in Australian Indigenous Policy (Aboriginal Studies Press, Canberra 2011). I am currently an Honorary Professor at the Crawford School for Public Policy (ANU), and a Professor at the Nulungu Research Institute, University of Notre Dame Australia, Broome. I led the ARC-funded project Reciprocal Accountability and Public Value in Aboriginal Organisations.

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Patrick Wright

Associate Lecturer in Arts and Humanities, Open University, The Open University
Patrick Wright received his PhD in English from the University of Manchester in 2007. He also holds two MAs, in English and in Creative Writing, from the same institution.

His AHRC-funded doctoral thesis focused on the sublime within a broader discourse on the sacred, making use of feminist and psychoanalytic theory. This project was supervised by Professor Terry Eagleton and Dr Anke Bernau.

He has been shortlisted for the Bridport Prize, and he has a pamphlet, Nullaby, published by Eyewear. His full debut collection, Shadows on the Ceiling, will be published in 2020 by the same publisher.

His poems have been published in several anthologies and magazines, most recently Agenda, The Reader, Iota, The High Window, and Wasafiri.

He is studying towards a second PhD in Creative Writing, focusing on innovative ekphrastic responses to modern art, supervised by Siobhan Campbell and Jane Yeh.

Research interests include literature from 1800 to the present, modern and contemporary poetry, art history, place writing, and issues of genre and translation.

He teaches on A111, A105, A233, and A335, and is a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has also taught English, at the University of Manchester and the University of Salford, and Art History and Visual Culture, at the Manchester Metropolitan University.

He is especially interested to hear from students looking to pursue literature or creative writing routes.

Email address: [email protected]

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Patrick F Walsh

Professor Intelligence and Security Studies, Charles Sturt University
Professor Patrick F Walsh is a Professor, Intelligence and Security studies at the Australian Graduate School of Policing and Security, Charles Sturt University, Australia. He consults to government and his research focuses on a range of intelligence capability issues including governance, leadership, intelligence and ethics, biosecurity, health security and cyber. He is the author of Intelligence and Intelligence Analysis, Routledge, UK 2011; Intelligence, Biosecurity and Bioterrorism, Palgrave Macmillan, UK, 2018; and Intelligence Leadership and Governance. Building Effective Intelligence Communities in the 21st Century, Routledge, 2020

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Patrick I. Hancock

Postdoctoral fellow, University of Virginia
Patrick I. Hancock is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Virginia School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. His research focuses on developing collaborative and behaviorally informed engineering practices that facilitate processes and generate outcomes that meet community definitions of social justice. Patrick’s work has appeared in Nature Sustainability, American Psychologist and iScience.

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Patrizia Gentile

Professor, Sexuality Studies/Human Rights & Social Justice, Carleton University
Research Interests: Cultural/gender history; history of sexuality; history and theory of the body; beauty contests; national security; queer theory

Cross-appointments: Institute of Interdisciplinary Studies/Feminist Institute of Social Transformation

Patrizia Gentile, Queen of the Maple Leaf: Beauty Contests and Settler Femininity (UBC Press,October 2020).
(Queen of the Maple of Leaf is nominated for the Canadian Historical Association Best Scholarly Book in Canadian History Prize 2021.)

Gary Kinsman and Patrizia Gentile. The Canadian War on Queers: National Security as Sexual Regulation. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 2010).

Patrizia Gentile, Gary Kinsman, and L.Pauline Rankin, eds. We Still Demand!: Redefining Resistance in Sex and Gender Struggles. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 2016)

Patrizia Gentile and Jane Nicholas, eds. Contesting Bodies and Nation in Canadian History (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2014)

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Patrycja Klusak

Affiliated Researcher, Bennett Institute of Public Policy, University of Cambridge and Associate Professor in Banking and Finance, University of East Anglia
Dr Patrycja Klusak is an Associate Professor in Banking and Finance at University of East Anglia and an Affiliated Researcher at Bennett Institute for Public Policy at the University of Cambridge.

Her research investigates the behaviour and regulation of credit ratings agencies (CRAs), and their effects on financial systems. Her work evaluates the extent to which regulations achieve their aims, or whether they lead to unintended consequences. Her research also examines the relationship between firms’ financial flexibility and their ratings, the extent of herding behaviour by CRAs, potential conflicts of interests in the CRA industry, and the effect of environmental, social, and governance (ESG) metrics on firm ratings. Her interdisciplinary work combines climate science and environmental economics with her expertise in empirical banking and applied econometrics to investigate how climate change risks have and could affect sovereign ratings.

Dr Klusak holds a PhD in Accounting and Finance and a BA in Banking and Finance from Bangor University, and an MPhil in Real Estate Finance at Cambridge University.

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Patryk Labuda

Research Fellow, University of Zurich
Patryk I. Labuda is a Swiss National Science Foundation Fellow at the University of Zurich. A former practitioner with experience in central and north Africa, Patryk draws on interdisciplinary methods to study how international institutions interpret legal norms to achieve public policy aims. He specialises in international (criminal) law, human rights, and peace and security studies. He has 14 years of work and research experience in central and north Africa, with a regional focus on the politics of the Democratic Republic of Congo, Central African Republic, Sudan and South Sudan. His first book ‘International Criminal Tribunals and Domestic Accountability: In the Court's Shadow' (OUP) was published in 2023. Patryk holds a PhD from the Geneva Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies.

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Patryk Makowski

PhD Candidate, Technological University of the Shannon
I am a devoted scholar with a strong interest in leadership dynamics and work behaviours, currently pursuing a PhD at the Technological University of the Shannon: Midland Midwest. My research, inspired by my Master's in General Business Studies and the global effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, focuses on the relationship between transformational leadership and work engagement in the context of remote work, encapsulating my dual commitment to personal growth and societal contribution.

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Patryk Szewczyk

Patryk is a security lecturer at Edith Cowan University and a member of the ECU Security Research Institute.

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Patti Shih

Research Fellow & Lecturer, University of Wollongong
I am Research Fellow at the Australian Centre for Health Engagement Evidence & Values (ACHEEV), and the Academic Program Director of the Bachelor with Honours Program at the School of Health & Society, University of Wollongong. I am a sociologist specialising in social and cultural aspects of healthcare and medicine. My current research focuses on public and consumer engagement in healthcare, and the implications of health technologies on medical overuse. I am currently developing new expertise and approaches in deliberative methods, co-design & co-research. I lecture in health policy, research methods, and justice and health.

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Paul Anand

I have held fellowships in Oxford and Cambridge Universities and am currently a Professor at the Open University, Research Associate at Oxford University and the London School of Economics.

My work stems from long standing interests in the foundations of decision sciences, used to be primarily normative, and have argued for the expansion of decision theory beyond older conceptions of rational choice, something that has, broadly speaking, taken place both in economics and philosophy. In recent years, I have been interested in the operationalisation of Sen’s capabilities approach to welfare economics and its use in debates about the measurement of progress.

Earlier work has been published in a variety of leading economics journals including The Economic Journal, Theory and Decision, Oxford Economic Papers, Economica, Journal of Health Economics, Annals of Operations Research and much of it is collected in my monograph Foundations of Rational Choice Under Risk published by Oxford University Press in 1993 (with reprints in 1995 and 2002). In addition, I have just edited and contributed to the Oxford University Press Handbook of Rational and Social Choice with Professor Prasanta Pattanaik (Riverside, University of California, USA) and Professor Clemens Puppe (Karlsruhe University, Germany) to be published in 2008. Work on capabilities and wellbeing is summarised in greater detail on the capabilities measurement project website.

I have also been interested in the interaction these theories and their development in policy contexts or experimental and survey based work. This work has been published in a wide variety of scientific journals including Science, Journal of Theoretical Politics, British Journal of Management, Social Theory and Practice, Social Indicators Research, Health Care Analysis and the Journal of Economic Psychology.

Having taught research methods at graduate level for five years and acted as a consultant researcher on economic statistics to the OECD and NAO my most recent work brings a these interests together with interests in the foundations of social choice. With about 25 colleagues, at the latest count, I have sought to demonstrate the extent to which the measurement of human capabilities is feasible along multiple dimensions and explore the techniques that can be applied to such measurements. This work has resulted in approximately a dozen publications and has been incorporated into research projects in Oxford, Glasgow and Buenos Aires.

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Paul Aveyard

Professor of Behavioural Medicine, University of Oxford
My research focuses on behavioural medicine. This is the integration of biological, psychological and sociological knowledge to prevent and treat disease and to aid rehabilitation. You can read more about our research on our team website here https://www.phc.ox.ac.uk/research/research-themes/health-behaviours-theme.

My work focuses on helping people change their behaviour, either to prevent serious disease, or as a treatment for that disease.

A lot of my work has examined interventions to help people stop or reduce their smoking and lately I have worked in helping people manage their weight if they have become obese.

People often use several drugs to help them stop smoking but our research suggested that combining these drugs does not help more than taking only one of them. Our research has shown that people who stop smoking put on a considerable amount of weight and we are investigating the best ways to prevent this weight gain but without harming the chance of stopping smoking.

One of our trials showed that people who were referred to commercial weight management providers lost more weight than people who tried to lose weight without support. However, people who went to their GP or practice nurse for support did no better than people trying without support. This result helped change government policy and local health organisations now contract with commercial weight providers. We have also shown that a brief 30-second behavioural intervention delivered by a clinician opportunistically can motivate a person to take up effective support and lose weight. Such brief interventions were highly acceptable to patients and easy for clinicians to deliver.

I work with several other organisations to improve health and healthcare. I am former president of the UK Society of Behavioural Medicine, a former trustee of the Association for the Study of Obesity, a member of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. I am a senior editor of the journal Addiction and coordinating editor of the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group. I have worked on several NICE working groups and advised the Department of Health and NHS England on smoking and obesity.

I try to make my publications available to everyone. Please have a look for them here https://ora.ox.ac.uk/ or on researchgate.net.

I am an NIHR senior investigator.

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Paul Barrett

Individual Merit Researcher, Natural History Museum
My major research interests are centred on the evolutionary palaeobiology of dinosaurs and other extinct amniotes. In addition, I am involved in projects to investigate macroevolutionary mechanisms, the evolution of Mesozoic terrestrial ecosystems and potential biases in the fossil record. Research is concentrated in three main areas:

1. Pattern and process in macroevolution. Controls on dinosaur diversity through time; testing of plant–dinosaur co-evolutionary scenarios; clade-clade interactions; correlated progression; influence of the rock record, collection bias and climate on fossil reptile diversity.

2. Functional morphology, palaeobiology and palaeoecology of herbivorous amniotes, principally sauropodomorph and ornithischian dinosaurs.

3. Taxonomic, systematic and faunal revisions of dinosaurs and other extinct reptiles (including lizards, plesiosaurs and ichthyosaurs).

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Paul Compton

Emeritus professor in Computer Science and Engineering, UNSW Sydney
I worked at the Garvan Insist of Medical Research for 20 years, initially as biophysicist but then as a computer scientist. At the Garvan I worked on one of the first medical expert systems to go into routine use. In 1990 I moved to Computer Science and Engineering at UNSW, where my research focus was mainly on better ways to build expert or knowledge-based systems and resulted in a family of techniques known as Ripple-Down Rules. This work was supported by a number of ARC grants, and has been successfully commercialised by Pacific Knowledge Systems (now Beamtree) and other companies internationally. I was one of the founders of PKS, but am not involved with Beamtree. I was also the Associate Dean (research) for the Faculty of Engineering at UNSW for 3 years and and head or acting head of the School of Computer Science and Engineering for 12 years. I retired in 2010 and am currently an advisor to Rich Data Corporation.

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Paul den Hoed

Senior Lecturer, School of Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering, University of the Witwatersrand
Although trained in chemical engineering, I am practised in pyrometallurgy and in chemistry at high temperatures, mostly in the chemical thermodynamics and kinetics of gas-solid reactions (oxidation, reduction and chlorination of oxide and sulfide minerals). I have also worked in teams testing and designing novel processes.
My work in R&D over the last three decades has fostered an invaluable set of skills. I combine a grasp of principles and techniques in "process mineralogy" and chemistry with an understanding of processes in chemical and metallurgical engineering. I retain a practised hand in the laboratory. I communicate clearly in English through writing, speaking and discussion. I have mentored students and colleagues in the craft of research: in critical thinking around process fundamentals and theory; in developing arguments; in marshaling data and evaluating hypotheses; and in communicating.

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Paul Dietschy

Professeur d'histoire contemporaine, Directeur du Centre Lucien Febvre (EA 2273), Université de Franche-Comté – UBFC
Ancien élève de l'École Normale Supérieure de Fontenay-Saint-Cloud, agrégé et docteur en histoire, Paul Dietschy est professeur d'histoire contemporaine et directeur du Centre Lucien Febvre à l'université de Bourgogne-France-Comté. Chercheur associé au Centre d'histoire de Sciences Po, il est spécialiste de l'histoire du sport et du football et de l'Italie contemporaine. Parmi ses publications : Histoire du football, Paris, Tempus, 2016, Le sport et la Grande Guerre, Paris, Chistera, 2018 et avec Stefano Pivato, Storia dello sport in Italia, Bologne, il mulino, 2019.

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Paul Dimeo

Senior Lecturer in Sport, University of Stirling

My main areas of research interest and expertise relate to drug use in sport and anti-doping policy.

I was a visiting Fulbright Commission Scholar at the University of Texas, Austin from September to December 2012, working on a project entitled: ‘The Doping of Elite Athletes in International Sport and the Politics of the Cold War, 1950-1990'.

I am the co-ordinator of SPS9SP Sports Policy. I also contribute to SPS9R7 Readings in Sports Studies, SPS9D8 Sports Dissertation and dissertation supervision.

My major research interest is doping in sport and the development of anti-doping policies. This has led to several publications including the prize-winning monograph A History of Drug Use in Sport, 1876-1976: Beyond Good and Evil (Routledge, 2007). I have recently completed three projects funded by the World Anti-Doping Agency. I have published on other policy issues including racism in sport, the migration of football players, tourism, and hosting major sports events.

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Paul Docherty

Paul's research interests lie in empirical finance and capital markets, focusing primarily on asset pricing. His research has been published in journals including Accounting and Finance, Applied Economics and The Australian Journal of Management.

He is the chief investigator for a large external grant that was awarded by Platypus Asset Management in 2011 and continues to work collaboratively with professionals in the funds management industry.

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Paul Dugdale

Director ANU Centre for Health Stewardship, Australian National University
Paul Dugdale is a public health physician with experience as a policy adviser, senior executive, juristictional chief health officer and hospital staff specialist.

He currently consults as Principal Medical Advisor for Aspen Medical Advisory Services Pty Ltd.

His clinical practice has been in chronic disease management including obesity medicine.

He is Clinical Professor of Public Health in the ANU School of Medicine and Psychology, and Director of the ANU Centre for Health Stewardship in the College of Health and Medicine.

He was previously Chair of the Australian Healthcare and Hospitals Association and is currently President of the Friends of the School of Music at AN

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Paul Felton

Senior Lecturer in Biomechanics in the School of Science and Technology, Nottingham Trent University
Paul Felton is a Senior Lecturer in Biomechanics in the School of Science and Technology. He has authored or co-authored world-leading, peer-reviewed research, has contributed to written-press and media features, and is the Principal Investigator or Co-Investigator for multiple PhD researchers.

Paul is one of cricket's most prominent applied researchers focusing on the technical characteristics linked to performance and injury. His main research interest lay within optimising individual sporting performance and has utilised predictive computer simulation models with industry collaborations including the England & Wales Cricket Board and the English Institute of Sport.

Paul also contributes to the teaching on the Sport and Exercise Science, Sport Science and Coaching, and Sport Science and Mathematics courses. He is the module leader of Applied Human Movement Science for Sport, and contributes to the following modules: Introduction to Human Movement Science, Analysis of Human Movement, Applied Sport Science, as well as supervising undergraduate and postgraduate projects.

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Paul Ginns

Associate Professor in Educational Psychology, University of Sydney
Dr Paul Ginns is Associate Professor in Educational Psychology in the Sydney School of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney, teaching foundational and elective educational psychology units across undergraduate and postgraduate education degrees. His research focuses on educational implications of human cognitive architecture and embodied cognition, motivation and engagement, and creativity.

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Paul Hanel

Research assistant professor, University of Essex
My research interests include social, personality, political, and cross-cultural psychology as well as science communication and research methods.

A significant part of my empirical work includes human values (e.g., freedom, loyalty, security). Among other things I am interested in how people perceive the values of other people, and whether living in cities or countries in which other people share one's values has positive effects on one's well-being.

Currently, I am especially interested in similarities between groups of people. While people often tend to assume that values, attitudes, and abilities differ between, for example, women and men, younger and older people, or people from different countries, the amount of similarities between these groups is on average pretty large, typically between 80 and 95%. In my research I investigate the effects of highlighting similarities between groups of people.

For a full list of my publications see my Google Scholar profile
https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=huR7aNgAAAAJ&hl=en

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Paul Heywood

Paul Heywood graduated with an MA in Politics (First Class) from the University of Edinburgh, then did postgraduate studies in Madrid and at the LSE, from where he received his MSc(Econ) and PhD (Politics). Before joining the University of Nottingham, he taught at the University of Glasgow and at the University of London. He also worked for the Economist Intelligence Unit, London (1989-93). He has been a member of the ESRC Research Grants Board (2001-05) and was Dean of the University of Nottingham Graduate School from 2003-07. He is currently Director of the University of Nottingham’s ESRC Doctoral Training Centre, which supports research students in the social sciences. Between 2003 and 2009 he was co-editor of the international journal Government and Opposition, and is currently Chair of the Board of Directors. Professor Heywood is author, co-author or editor of fifteen books and more than eighty journal articles and book chapters. His research focuses on political corruption, institutional design and state capacity in contemporary Europe. In 2006, he was appointed Adjunct Professor at the University of Hunan (China), where he is Senior Adviser to the Center for Clean Governance. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts (elected 2002), and an Academician of the Academy of Social Sciences (elected 2012).

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Paul Hodkinson

Professor of Sociology, University of Surrey
Paul Hodkinson is Professor of Sociology at the University of Surrey. His research focuses on fathers and fathering, youth cultures, pathways through adulthood and experiences of digital social media spaces. He is particularly interested in understanding people's experiences of contemporary life course journeys and transitions.

His books include 'New Fathers, Mental Health and Digital Communication' (with Ranjana Das), 'Sharing Care: Equal and Primary Carer Fathers and Early Years Parenting' (with Rachel Brooks), 'Media, Culture and Society', 'Ageing and Youth Cultures' (with Andy Bennett), 'Youth Cultures: Scenes, Subcultures and Tribes' (with Wolfgang Deicke) and 'Goth: Identity, Style and Subculture'.

He is currently co-editor of the journal, Sociology, and was previously co-editor of Sociological Research Online.

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Paul Holland

Ocean and Ice Scientist, British Antarctic Survey
I am a late-career ice/ocean scientist in the Shelf Seas group at BAS, and an honorary professor at the University of Bristol. My research focusses on the physics of polar oceans, sea ice (frozen seawater), and ice sheets (glacial ice). This research is broadly motivated by understanding changes in global ocean circulation and sea-level rise. I primarily study Antarctica and the Southern Ocean. The Antarctic Ice Sheet is currently losing ice, causing sea-level rise, and this has been caused by changes in ocean melting. My current research focus is to understand why this ice loss is occurring, and how it may change in future.

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Paul Kennedy

Dr Paul Kennedy joined the Department in 2000, having previously lectured in the Department of European Studies at Loughborough University.

He graduated from the University of Sheffield and completed his doctoral thesis on the Spanish Socialist Government of 1982-1996 at Cardiff University.

Previously he had worked at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

His monograph entitled 'The Spanish Socialist Party and the modernisation of Spain' was published by Manchester University Press in 2013.

His research interests focus on contemporary Spanish history and politics.

His most recent work has considered the impact of the international economic crisis on Spain, related articles considering the Spanish Socialist Government’s amendment of the 1978 Constitution in 2011, and the impact of the Popular Party Government’s 2012 Labour Reform.

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Paul Lashmar

Dr Paul Lashmar joined Sussex in October 2015 as a Senior Lecturer and he is also an investigative journalist and research academic.

Prior to Sussex he was at Brunel University. His PhD is on the links between the intelligence services and the media, which is his core research interest.

Paul is a highly regarded investigative journalist and has worked in television, radio and print. He has been on the staff of The Observer, Granada Television’s World in Action current affairs series and The Independent. He has also produced a number of TV programmes for BBC’s Timewatch and Channel 4’s Dispatches series and is the author of three books and a chapter in ‘Investigative Journalism: Context & Theory’ (2008).

He covered the ‘War on Terror’ for the Independent on Sunday from 2001-2008.

He was awarded ‘Reporter of The Year’ in the 1986 UK Press Awards. Paul has written about terrorism, intelligence, organised crime, offshore crime, business fraud and the Cold War and has broken many major domestic and international stories. He is an adviser to the Centre for Investigative Journalism. Often interviewed on radio about these and other subjects.

An adviser to the Centre for Investigative Journalism at City University.

His full CV can be found at www.paullashmar.com

Specialist in journalism education and training

Current research interests:

* The British Press and the EU
* Moral Panics and the Journalist
* Information flow between intelligence agencies and the news media
* The relationship between reporters and their audience
* Excellence in Journalism Practice
* Socio-economic diversity in journalism
* Journalism and war on terror
* Journalism and organised crime
* Online media entrepreneurialism

Forthcoming book. Multimedia Journalism. Co-author with Steve Hill (Solent University) Sage Publications. Due publication Sept 2013. This book is a synthesis of theory and practice and includes interviews with practitioners.

June 2013 - Paul has a chapter "Journalist, Folk Devil?" in Moral Panics in the Contemporary World. (Eds: Critcher, Hughes, Petley and Rohloff). London: Bloomsbury. Moral panic theorists say the media are central to the 40 year old and popular concept, but in this chapter Paul Lashmar challenges the model observing that no research into actual journalism practice on stories deemed moral panics has previously been undertaken.

From July 2011 Paul has been Honorary Editor for the Proceedings of the Dorset Natural History and Archaeological Society (DNHAS). The Proceedings is an annual semi-scholarly publication that has been published since 1870s. The first volume (133) under Paul's editorship has been available since November 2012. For more details contact Dorset County Museum. The index and details of Proceedings can be found here.

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Paul Lasky

Lecturer, Monash University

Paul is a lecturer at Monash University. He is interested in everything related to gravitational physics and Einstein's theory of relativity, and is involved in a variety of research topics such as neutron star and black hole physics, gravitational waves, cosmology, gravitational lensing and alternative theories of gravity. As a member of both the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) Scientific Collaboration, and the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array collaboration he is contributing to the global gravitational wave detection effort by modelling gravitational wave sources and developing data analysis search algorithms.

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Paul Levy

Paul is author of the new book Digital Inferno (launched in 2015). He is a writer, researcher (at the Centre for Research in Innovation Management, CENTRIM, University of Brighton), facilitator and collusion breaker. Paul also co-authored the books Technosophy and E:Quality. He has written articles for journals, conference, newspapers and magazines. You can visit his other web sites at: http://rationalmadness.wordpress.com/ and http://digitalinferno.wordpress.com/ where you can find most of his writings.

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Paul Liknaitzky

Head of Clinical Psychedelic Research, Monash University
Paul Liknaitzky is Head of Clinical Psychedelic Research at Monash University, and Chief Principal Investigator on a program of psychedelic trials. He is a Research Fellow within both the Dept of Psychiatry (School of Clinical Sciences) and the Turner Institute for Brain and Mental Health (School of Psychological Sciences) at Monash University. He earned an Honours in Neuroscience and a PhD in Psychology from the University of Melbourne, and has Adjunct or Honorary appointments at St Vincent’s Hospital, Macquarie University, Deakin University, and the University of Melbourne. In Australia, he is an Investigator on a number of the country’s initial psychedelic trials, coordinated the first applied psychedelic therapist training programs, obtained the first industry funding for psychedelic science, and leads the first clinical psychedelic lab. His work is focused on developing a rigorous program of research in clinical psychedelics that seeks to evaluate therapeutic effects, innovate on treatment design, mitigate known risks, explore potential drawbacks, and understand therapeutic mechanisms.

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Paul Loh

Lecturer in digital architecture design, University of Melbourne

Paul Loh is lecturer in Digital Architecture design at the University of Melbourne. Prior to this Paul studied architecture at the University of Melbourne and University of East London before joining the Design Research Lab at the Architectural Association where he completed his Master in Architecture and Urbanism. He has over 12 years of practice experience in London, Melbourne and Kuala Lumpur. Paul was senior lecturer at the University of East London between 2005 and 2011. He has taught at the Architectural Association and lectured in UK, Sweden, Italy and China. He is a partner of Melbourne based design practice LLDS / Power To Make, focusing on the relationship between making, technology and material. Paul is a PhD candidate at SIAL RMIT. His main research interest is digital fabrication and craft formation in computational design.

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Paul Lushenko

Assistant Professor and Director of Special Operations, US Army War College
LTC Paul Lushenko is an Assistant Professor and Director of Special Operations at the U.S. Army War College. He earned his Ph.D. and M.A. in International Relations from Cornell University. He also holds an M.A. in Defense and Strategic Studies from the U.S. Naval War College, an M.A. in International Relations and a Master of Diplomacy from The Australian National University, and a B.S. from the U.S. Military Academy. Paul has deployed continuously, directing intelligence operations at the Battalion, Combined Task Force, and Joint Task Force levels. In his most recent operational assignment, Paul served as the Senior Intelligence Officer for the Joint Special Operations Task Force in Afghanistan, and was also responsible for shaping the coalition’s strategy to defeat the Islamic State and helping to regionalize U.S. counterterrorism policy and strategy. Paul is a Council on Foreign Relations Term Member, Adjunct Research Lecturer at Charles Sturt University, and Non-Resident Senior Fellow at Cornell University’s Tech Policy Institute. He is the co-editor of Drones and Global Order: Implications of Remote Warfare for International Society (2022), which is the first book to systematically study the implications of drone warfare on global politics. He also has a book forthcoming on the public’s perceptions of legitimate drone strikes, entitled The Legitimacy of Drone Warfare: Evaluating Public Perceptions (2024).

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Paul M. Collins Jr.

Paul M. Collins, Jr. is Professor of Legal Studies and Political Science at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. He holds a Ph.D. and M.A. in political science from Binghamton University and a B.S. in political science from the University of Scranton. His research focuses on understanding the democratic nature of the judiciary, interdisciplinary approaches to legal decision making, and interest group litigation.

The recipient of numerous research awards, he has published articles in the Journal of Empirical Legal Studies, Journal of Law and Courts, Journal of Politics, Law & Social Inquiry, Law & Society Review, Notre Dame Law Review, Political Research Quarterly, and other journals. His research has been funded by grants from the Dirksen Congressional Center and the National Science Foundation. He is currently a member of the editorial boards of the Justice System Journal and Law & Social Inquiry, and formerly sat on the boards of Law & Society Review and Political Research Quarterly. He is also the President of the Consortium for Undergraduate Law and Justice Programs and was the List Master of the Law and Courts Discussion List from 2014-2020. His research and commentary have appeared in a host of popular media outlets, including CNN, the New York Times, National Law Journal, National Public Radio, San Francisco Chronicle, Time, USA Today, Voice of America, Wall Street Journal, and the Washington Post. He has also authored articles in SCOTUSblog, Slate, The Conversation, and the Washington Post.

Collins is also the author of three books. The President and the Supreme Court: Going Public on Judicial Decisions from Washington to Trump, coauthored with Matthew Eshbaugh-Soha, was published in 2019 by Cambridge University Press. Supreme Court Confirmation Hearings and Constitutional Change, coauthored with Lori A. Ringhand, was published in 2013 by Cambridge University Press and was recognized by Choice as an 2014 Outstanding Academic Title. Friends of the Supreme Court: Interest Groups and Judicial Decision Making was published in 2008 by Oxford University Press and received the 2009 C. Herman Pritchett Award from the Law and Courts Section of the American Political Science Association. This award recognizes Friends of the Supreme Court as the best book on law and courts written by a political scientist.

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Paul Moon

Professor of History, Auckland University of Technology
I teach history, specialising in Britain's colonisation of New Zealand, and the Treaty of Waitangi.

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