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Nick Lehr1

Arts + Culture Editor
Nick Lehr has been The Conversation's Arts + Culture editor since 2014. His work has appeared in The Boston Globe, the Cut, the Christian Science Monitor and Salon.ure Editor

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Nick Lomb

Honorary Professor, Centre for Astrophysics, University of Southern Queensland
I have had a variety of research directions over my career. During my PhD project on short period variable stars, I developed the theory of least squares frequency analysis for unequally spaced data. This is now a standard method of numerical analysis, called the Lomb or Lomb-Scargle Periodogram, that is used in astronomy and other fields.

Later at Sydney Observatory, the focus was on astrometry, that is, the positions and motions of stars and solar system objects. This work culminated in the publication of a star catalogue, of which I was co-author.

Then, when the Observatory came under the auspices of the Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences, I became the Museum’s Curator of Astronomy. As such, I planned exhibitions and collected and looked after instruments and other items relating to astronomy. I was also involved with the media and with public education and outreach.

On leaving the Observatory and the Museum, my research emphasis became the history of Australian astronomy, with my latest book, with Toner Stevenson, 'Eclipse Chasers', to be released in March 2023. As well, I continue to prepare the annual Australasian Sky Guide for Powerhouse Publishing and maintain my interest in combatting light pollution.

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Nick Mayhew

Lecturer in Russian, University of Glasgow
Before joining the University of Glasgow, I was a Lecturer in Russian at the University of Oxford (2021-2022) and an Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Research Fellow and Lecturer in Slavic Languages & Literatures at Stanford University (2018-2021). I received my PhD in Slavonic Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2018.

My research explores queer gender and sexuality in Russian, Ukrainian and Church Slavonic culture. As a gay man living in Moscow when Russia introduced its law against the "propaganda of non-traditional sexual relations", I saw first-hand how culture, history and religion can be manipulated to fuel discrimination. My research is premised on telling queer counternarratives about Russian culture and especially religion, to shine light on a rich queer heritage too often obscured from scholarly perception.

I am particularly interested in bringing queerness to light in contexts that are usually deemed conservative and heteronormative, such as within the Orthodox Church. On the one hand, I am interested in thinking through how sexual minorities negotiate their relationships with cultural and religious traditions that have marginalised them, and on the other hand, I look at queerness inherent to the traditions themselves.

My publications focus mainly on the medieval and early modern periods, although I am moving increasingly into the nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. I am also interested in the telling of cultural and historical narratives about gender and sexuality in the present, and in queerness in contemporary pop culture.

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Nick McKerrell

Lecturer in Law, Glasgow Caledonian University

Nick is a Lecturer in Law in the Department of Law, Economics, Accountancy and Risk. Nick teaches mainly in the area of Public Law, Human Rights and Civil Liberties. His research reflects this including many public law issues including: developments around the Scottish Parliament, constitutional legal theory, housing law and the changing ways in which the state interacts with society and individuals. Nick regularly appears on radio discussing civil liberties issues in Scottish society. He has also written on legal research skills for students at all levels.

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Nick Pepin

I am a climate scientist interested in mountain climates and how they may respond in a warmer world.

I graduated from the University of Durham in 1991 with a first class degree BSc in Geography. I went on to study in Durham for a PhD supervised by Joan Kenworthy and Nick Cox, investigating long-term climate change in the Pennines in Northern England using meteorological records, and was awarded the PhD in 1994.

In 1994 I started at the University of Portsmouth as lecturer in climatology/meteorology in the Department of Geography. In 1998 I was a visiting scientist for six months at the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research (INSTAAR), part of the University of Colorado at Boulder, USA. I studied long-term climate change in the instrumental records kept by the Mountain Research Station at high elevations in the Colorado Rockies. This work was sponsored by a Fulbright Scholarship.

In 2003/2004 I was awarded a National Academies National Science Foundation scholarship to visit NOAA’s Air Resources Laboratory in Silver Spring Maryland, U.S.A. for 12 months as a Senior Research Associate. My work as part of the Climate Variability and Trends Research Group under adviser Dr Dian Seidel, was concerned with the comparison of temperature trends from a variety of global datasets (surface, radiosonde and reanalyses). The focus was trends at high elevations sites, since mountain summits show some of the characteristics of both the free atmosphere and the Earth’s surface (boundary layer).

More recently I have developed work on Kilimanjaro, installing a transect of 22 stations which observe air temperature and humidity - on both the south-west and north-eastern slopes. The range in elevation from below 1000 m to 5800 m is amongst the largest in the world, making the site critical for examining elevation changes in warming rates (elevation-dependent warming). In 2015 I helped lead a paper examining mountain warming (https://www.nature.com/articles/nclimate2563). I also have current field projects in the Pyrenees and in Finnsh Lapland examining cold air drainage patterns and how they may change in a warmer world.

In 2018 I was a visiting scientist at the Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research at the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing (PIFI scholarship) and have links with many Chinese researchers.

I am currently Reader in Climate Science in the newly-formed SEGG (School of Environment, Geography and Geosciences) and I am a senior member of the Environmental Processes and Change Research Group.

Research Interests
Global and regional temperature change in mountainous regions

Research concerns analysis of 20th/21st century temperature change in mountainous regions using a variety of primary and secondary datasets. Comparison of high quality homogenised climate datasets allows a comparison between free-atmospheric changes (measured by radiosonde and some satellite data and assimilated datasets such as reanalyses) and surface temperature changes (as measured by conventional instrumentation). Most recently work has compared MODIS LST (land surface temperature) data for mountainous areas with in situ air temperature data, with a particular focus on the Tibetan plateau.

This work has been undertaken in collaboration with many international organisations including the Climate Variability and Trends Group at the Air Resources Laboratory in Silver Spring, Maryland, the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, San Diego, the University of Washington, Oregon State University, and the Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research in Beijing, China. Funding has been obtained from Royal Society, National Academy of Sciences (U.S), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fulbright Commission and Newton Fund.

Measuring and modelling surface temperatures in areas of complex relief

Part of the reason why mountains and areas of incised topography show varied environmental responses to climate change is because of their inherent spatial and temporal complexity. Members of staff at Portsmouth have been part of climate monitoring campaigns in mountains and complex terrain around the world, including the Rocky Mountains of the USA, Arctic Lapland (northern Finland and Sweden), the Pyrenees, the uplands of England and Scotland, and on Mt Kilimanjaro in Africa.

The focus has been on obtaining better information on the spatial and temporal variation in surface temperature and moisture fields using networks of meteorological sensors. This information allows us to relate temperature patterns to synoptic conditions, and thus to investigate the influence of landscape position on longer-term climate trends.

Work has been performed in collaboration with the following institutions:

University of Brunei Darussalam
University of Colorado Mountain Research Station
University of Turku Sub-Arctic Research Station
Abisko Scientific Research Station
University of Massachussetts
University of St Andrews
Centre for Ecology and Hydrology
Servei Meteorologic de Catalunya
Funding has been obtained from LAPBIAT 2, INTERACT, NERC and RCIF

The influence of land use change on mountain climate on Kilimanjaro and consequences for summit ice fields

Another emergent research strand is the response of the cryosphere (snow and ice) in mountain regions to contemporary climate change. This work involves a wide range of foci ranging from global analyses examining long term changes in snow cover in mountains and its influence on surface energy balance and mountain temperatures, to regional influences of atmospheric circulation on snow cover, and local field investigation into factors influencing snow distribution in the altitudinal and latitudinal forest-tundra ecotones (areas which are expected to show rapid environmental response to climate change).

In relation to this specific project, NERC funding has been obtained to monitor mountain climate on the slopes of Kilimanjaro in Tanzania, East Africa. Through the installation of two unique climate transects on the SW and NE slopes of the mountain, covering a range of 5000 metres in elevation and extending back to 2004, this study can examine the day to day role of the diurnal thermal circulation in transporting moisture to and from the summit region. Typically, during the day moisture is transported upslope to the crater region, contributing indirectly (through cloud cover and increased humidity) or directly (through precipitation) to the mass balance of the summit ice fields. However these ice fields are in rapid retreat. The role of vegetation and land use change in this process is a focus of this project.

Funding has been obtained from NERC and RGS.

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Nick Pratt

Associate Professor of Education, University of Plymouth
I’m an Associate Professor of Education at the University of Plymouth, UK and I lead the Institute of Education’s research. I have worked in education for 35 years, first as a primary school teacher and then with Plymouth University. My areas of interest are particularly around teacher accountability and the effects this has on pupils/students and on pedagogical relationships. My teaching includes working with undergraduate education students and a number of post-graduate research students on both PhD and EdD routes. I live in East Devon, UK, close to the sea.

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Nick Webb

Senior Lecturer in Architecture, University of Liverpool
Nick Webb is an architect and researcher based at the Liverpool School of Architecture. His research investigates how digital tools and techniques can be used as methods to enhance and critique our understanding of historic works of architecture. Nick’s research focuses on methods that enable new information to be provided that would have been almost impossible in a pre-digital context, including digital capture technologies such as laser scanning, three-dimensional digital modelling and analysis, and immersive virtual reality techniques. He is a registered architect and has previously worked in architectural practice, mainly community and social housing projects.

Nick’s research currently focusses on existing historic works of architecture, notably investigating the design and construction of English medieval vaulting aided by digital techniques in collaboration with Dr Alex Buchanan. The project, Tracing the Past, has analysed many significant sites in England including the cathedrals of Wells and Exeter, attracted funding from the Arts and Humanities Research Council, brought together international experts in vault design by hosting two symposiums, made their data available publicly via the Archaeology Data Service and Sketchfab, as well as organising a series of public talks and workshops to share their findings. The project resulted in a book, published by Routledge and co-authored alongside Dr Alex Buchanan and Dr James Hillson ‘Digital Analysis of Vaults in English Medieval Architecture.’

Nick is also interested in unbuilt, partially built and destroyed architecture, or designs that were not built at all. He previously researched Sir Edwin Lutyens’ partially built design for Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral. He has also collaborated with Dr Zoe Alker to investigate Bentham’s unbuilt Panopticon Prison.

As a registered architect, Nick spends a large amount of time teaching design studio at the LSA. He has tutored in BA1 (2009-2014), ran a design studio in BA2 (2013-2018), and co-led a heritage related design studio alongside Dr Ataa Alsalloum in BA3 (2019-present). He was also year lead for BA2 between 2016-2018. Nick has been part of the BA Admissions Team since 2013 and has been the department’s Equality, Diversity and Inclusion Co-Champion since 2020.

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Nick Whittaker

Subject Lead in Social Sciences & Law, University of Sussex
Nick is a researcher and teacher of International Relations and Politics at the University of Sussex International Study Centre. His book, 'Geopolitics and Identity in British Foreign Policy Discourse: The Island Race', is published with Routledge in July 2023. His research interests include critical geopolitics, British politics, foreign policy, national identity and discourse. He has written for the major academic journals 'Political Geography' and 'Geopolitics' and the 'Strategy in the Contemporary World' textbook. As a speaker, he has recently addressed a Labour Party branch meeting and a conference of Geography teachers on what Brexit means for British foreign policy and identity.

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Nick Wright

Research scientist, Department of Primary Industries & Regional Development, The University of Western Australia

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Nick William Smith

Research Officer, Riddet Institute, Massey University
Dr Nick Smith holds degrees in mathematics and in nutritional science from Swansea University (UK) and Massey University (NZ). His expertise is in mathematical modelling of complex systems, with particular focus on human nutrition. His former research interest was in predictive models for dynamics in the human intestinal microbiome, and the influence on host health and wellbeing. He now studies the dynamics of the global food system and their impact on the nutrition of the global population.

Dr Smith is currently a Research Officer at the Riddet Institute, a New Zealand Centre of Research Excellence hosted by Massey University. The focus of the Riddet Institute is upon food science, food technology, and human nutrition. Dr Smith’s current research is part of the Sustainable Nutrition Initiative, a program providing evidence for the sustainable food system debate and ensuring that human nutrition is seen as a key aspect of sustainability. His focus is on the continued development of the DELTA Model: a world-leading and freely available tool to investigate sustainable nutrient production and what is possible, practical and optimal from the global food system.

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Nicky Grimaldi

Assistant Professor of Arts, Northumbria University, Newcastle
After graduating in 1993 from Northumbria University with a Master of Arts Degree in the Conservation of Fine Art Nicola Grimaldi spent many years working in private practice. Clients have included many Regional and National Museums and Galleries, organisations such as National Trust, and Chatsworth Trust. From 2004 she was employed by Tyne and Wear Museums as the painting conservator for a collection of around 3000 easel paintings. During this period she was involved in overseeing major projects such as National Gallery Partnership Exhibition with Tyne and Wear Museums.

Nicola has been involved with the preparation of loans and courier duties for many National and International organisations including the Teniers Exhibition in Germany in 2006 and an exhibition of work by Paul Gauguin and Van Gogh in Dallas Museum of Art 2006. She supervised and advised on care of collections, including storage, packing and handling and was also involved in training internal and external museum staff as part of Renaissance in the Region project in aspects of care of easel paintings and general collections care. She is currently employed by Northumbria University as Senior Lecturer for the Masters Degree in Conservation of Fine Art teaching aspects of painting conservation as well as supervising MA dissertation projects. Nicola is also involved in external work for the University including research and consultancy.

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Nicky Jones

Senior Lecturer, University of Southern Queensland
Research interests
Public international law, human rights law, secularism and religious freedom, anti-discrimination law, politics, consumer issues and consumer law.

Professional memberships
Queensland Law Society
Australian & New Zealand Society of International Law
International Law Association (Australian branch)
Australasian Law Academics' Association
Queensland Council for Civil Liberties
Australian Lawyers for Human Rights

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Nicky Nielsen

Senior Lecturer in Egyptology, University of Manchester
I am a Senior Lecturer in Egyptology at the University of Manchester. Originally from Denmark, I was awarded an AHRC Block Grant to undertake PhD research at the University of Liverpool investigating subsistence strategies and craft production at the Ramesside fortress site of Zawiyet Umm el-Rakham. I obtained my PhD in 2016.

I have excavated in Europe, Turkey and Egypt, and I am currently the field director of the University of Liverpool Tell Nabasha Survey Project, which conducts archaeological investigations of the ancient city of Imet located in the north-eastern Nile Delta. I have published several peer-reviewed papers, as well as more public-oriented articles and I am the author of 'Pharaoh Seti I' (2018), 'From Mummies to Microchips' (2020, co-authored w/ Professor Joyce Tyldesley) and 'Egyptomaniacs: How We Became Obsessed with Ancient Egypt' (2020).

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Nicola Helps

Research fellow, Monash University
Nicola Helps is a postdoctoral research fellow with the Monash Gender and Family Violence Prevention Centre. Nicola holds a PhD in criminology from Monash University. Nicola’s current research examines identification and responses to domestic and family violence perpetration. Nicola also works on projects examining early intervention and prevention of workplace sexual harassment.

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Nicola Lester

PhD Candidate, School of Law and Politics, Cardiff University
Nicola's PhD research focuses understanding the impact of the military's response on the bereaved military family following a death in the line of duty. She has a background as a mental health nurse, specialising in working with psychological trauma. In addition to her research activities, she works as an advisor to both statutory and non-statutory organisations, in the UK and overseas, to support the development of trauma informed organisational responses following a traumatic incident.

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Nicola J. Williams

Wellcome Lecturer in The Ethics of Human Reproduction, Lancaster University
Nicola Williams joined the Department of Politics, Philosophy and Religion at the University of Lancaster in September 2014. Her research background is in the fields of Philosophy and Politics and her main academic interests lie in questions of reproductive ethics, transplantation ethics, personal identity and intergenerational justice. She graduated from The University of Reading in 2008 with a BA in Politics and Philosophy, The University of York in 2010 with an MA in Practical Ethics, and The University of Manchester in 2015 with a PhD in Bioethics and Medical Jurisprudence.

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Nicolas Ajzenman

Assistant Professor of Economics, McGill University
Nicolas Ajzenman is an Assistant Professor at McGill (Economics Department) and an affiliated professor at J-PAL and IZA. Previously, he was an Assistant Professor at the Sao Paulo School of Economics-FGV. Ajzenman is an applied microeconomist, working at the intersection of development economics, behavioral economics, and political economy. His research has appeared or is forthcoming in top scientific journals such as the American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, Economic Journal, Journal of Labor Economics, Journal of Development Economics, The Journal of Law and Economics, Economics of Education Review, and Health Economics. He was a Visiting Scholar in the Behavioral Economics Group of the Inter-American Development Bank. He has also worked and consulted for multilateral development organizations, such as the World Bank and the EBRD. He holds a Ph.D. in Economics (Sciences Po), a Master in Public Administration-International Development (Harvard University), a Master's degree in Economics (Universidad de San Andres), and a BA in Economics (Universidad de Buenos Aires).

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Nicolas Barbier

Chercheur en Écologie Tropicale à l'UMR AMAP, Institut de recherche pour le développement (IRD)

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Nicolas Barbier

Chercheur en Écologie Tropicale à l'UMR AMAP, Institut de recherche pour le développement (IRD)

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Nicolas Cabaton

Chercheur en Toxicologie, Inrae
Après une thèse en sciences des aliments, option toxicologie de l’Université de Bourgogne, j’ai passé trois ans à l’Université Tufts à Boston (USA) pour étudier les effets néfastes du bisphénol A après une exposition périnatale à (très) faibles doses sur les paramètres de fertilité, développement et fonctionnement de la glande mammaire. De retour en France, j’ai fait un second post-doc dans l’unité Inra «Xénobiotiques» puis «Toxalim» pour mettre en place des approches globales de métabolomique pour l’étude des effets à faibles concentrations de perturbateurs endocriniens sur le métabolisme. J’ai ensuite été recruté en 2011 dans cette unité Inrae pour m’intéresser au rôle de la bioactivation métabolique dans les mécanismes d’action toxique des contaminants alimentaires et environnementaux de type perturbateur endocrinien.

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Nicolas Charles

Géologue, PhD, BRGM
Docteur en géologie, Nicolas Charles est géologue au BRGM, le Service géologique national. Il participe à de nombreux projets à l'international et en France sur la cartographie géologique et les ressources minérales. Depuis 2016, il coordonne un projet européen de formation en géosciences en Afrique (PanAfGeo) visant à renforcer les partenariats entre services géologiques européens et africains. Auteur de nombreux ouvrages de médiation scientifique sur le patrimoine géologique français, il anime aussi des conférences sur la géologie et les ressources minérales.

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Nicole Adams

Clinical Associate Professor of Nursing, Purdue University
I have over 15 years at the bedside and in hospital leadership positions as an RN in the Southwest and Midwest United States. I am a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nursing and Health Policy Fellow and completed my PhD in the RWJF nursing and health policy collaborative at the University of New Mexico. My current research focuses on how community coalitions address substance use and the meaningful use of technology in healthcare. The latter includes the development of software solutions and Narcan delivery drones.

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Nicole Badstuber

Nicole's research focuses on transport policy and governance for city regionas. Nicole is currently a researcher at LSE Cities' New Urban Governance project as well as a doctoral student at the Centre for Transport at UCL. Nicole is also currently supporting the Horizon 2020 funded project CREATE looking at the evolution of transport policy in cities in Europe.

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Nicole Basaraba

Assistant Professor in Digital Humanities, Trinity College Dublin
Nicole Basaraba received her PhD from Trinity College Dublin, Ireland with a specialisation in digital media narratives and digital humanities. Her research focuses on evaluating and finding best practices for creating interactive digital narratives in non-fiction genres. She is particularly interested in how participatory digital culture impacts storytelling practices in cultural heritage and tourism contexts, such as in creative and digital place-making. Basaraba also has a Master of Arts in Communications and Technology from the University of Alberta, Canada. She has presented at over 20 conferences worldwide and her work has been published in multiple peer-reviewed journals.

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Nicole Bernhardt

Assistant Professor, Political Science, University of Toronto
Nicole Bernhardt is an Assistant Professor in Political Science at University of Toronto Scarborough. Her research focuses on human rights policy as a response to structural racism in policing. She has worked as a policy advisor for the Anti-Racism Directorate and an investigator with the Ontario Human Rights Commission. She received her PhD in politics from York University and was awarded the Abella Scholarship for Studies in Equity. Nicole teaches courses on Canadian government and public policy, and currently serves on the executive for the Black Canadian Studies Association.

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Nicole Cook

Lecturer, School of Geography and Sustainable Communities, University of Wollongong
Dr Nicole Cook is an urban geographer with research interests in urban restructuring, urban governance, power and participation, social movement and resident activism, housing and home. She specialises in theoretically-driven urban case studies and qualitative research methods.

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Nicole Eggers

Assistant Professor of History, University of Tennessee
Nicole Eggers’ research interests include 20th-21st Century Congolese history, health and healing, refugees, and religion and politics in Central Africa. Her first book, Unruly Ideas: A History of Kitawala in Congo (Ohio University Press, 2023) follows the history of the influential religious movement Kitawala from its colonial beginnings in the 1920s to its present-day influence in some of the most conflicted parts of Eastern Congo. The study highlights practitioners of Kitawala as intellectuals and innovators and considers broad theoretical questions about how they have historically drawn on and reformulated practices of spiritual and social healing in times of upheaval, creating a historically situated framework for understanding how they and their communities have experienced and understood power and violence. In the process, the book engages a number of fields of inquiry: health and healing, violence and power, religion and rebellion, intersections of gender and power, colonial incarceration, prayer and spiritual agency, and nationalism and the post-colonial imagination.

Eggers’ second book, tentatively titled Refuge in the Spirit: Religion in the Lives of Congolese Refugees, is a collaborative project centered around oral histories of Congolese refugee communities. For this project, Eggers and her collaborator, Dr. Roger Alfani, are investigating the significance of religion at different junctures of the Congolese refugee experience. With funding from an NEH Collaborative Grant, they have conducted interviews among Congolese refugees living in refugee camps in Kenya, Uganda, and Burundi, as well as among those who have left the camps to be resettled in Knoxville. The project seeks to illuminate how religion has functioned both as a space for building community for people who have lost their social safety net, as well as its role in addressing gaps — material, social, psychological, and spiritual — that state and international organizations too often neglect. Central to their investigation is the question of how people connect their experiences of social and physical security and insecurity to their understandings of spiritual security and insecurity. They argue that in-depth study of the religious lives of refugees is inherently valuable as a form of social and intellectual history that illuminates the complex inner lives and communal connections of people who are frequently viewed exclusively through the lens of trauma and crisis.

In the classroom, Dr. Eggers is dedicated to teaching students how to ask evocative questions, think critically, and write effectively. One of her main goals is to teach students to reevaluate what they think they know about Africa and the study of history by introducing them to historical methods and narratives that highlight African experiences and voices. Dr. Eggers encourages active and creative student engagement with course themes and materials - both within and outside of the classroom - and strives to teach students that even when they are learning about places and peoples that are perhaps unfamiliar, they can learn to become critical consumers and producers of knowledge.

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Nicole Esteban

Associate Professor of Marine Biology, Swansea University
Nicole is a marine ecologist with a focus on tropical coastal ecosystems and 20 years’ experience of working in integrated coastal zone management with NGOs, public and private agencies in the UK, Caribbean, Red Sea and Indian Ocean. She gained practical conservation management experience as a Manager of a Caribbean National Marine Park for eight years whilst producing and coordinating Management Plans, Biodiversity Action Plans and Environmental Impact Assessments,

Based at Swansea University, Nicole's research interests lie in improving our understanding of spatial and habitat use by marine fauna, with a focus on sea turtles and fish. Current research projects include increasing our understanding of movement of sea turtles in the Western Indian Ocean, impacts of marine debris on sea turtles and tracking salmonid fish movements using acoustics in the Bristol Channel. Nicole teaches modules on tropical marine ecology and conservation and skills to assess marine biodiversity via a range of tools and applications.

Nicole is a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy, a member of the IUCN Species Survival Commission Marine Turtle Specialist Group and has been appointed by DEFRA UK to the Western Indian Ocean sea turtle task force. She has an ongoing personal interest in co-management of natural resources, stakeholder engagement within conservation management and communication of conservation and research activities to the wider public.

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Nicole Huxley

Gudjala and Girramay leader, Indigenous Knowledge
Ms Nicole Huxley is a proud Gudjala woman with a strong connection to her cultural heritage. Ms Huxley is well known for her long history of fighting for recognition of First Nations people, particularly throughout North Queensland. Currently Nicole is on the North Queensland Land Council Board of Directors and also represents her traditional country of Charters Towers as a Director on their RNTBC. As Community Manager for Jumbun Ltd (current role) Ms Huxley is leading progress on community-determined priorities and bringing the community together through the Gumbudda in our Mala (GoiM) program, which was designed by community for community. GoiM is a truth-telling, healing and empowerment program that outlined the aspirations and goals of the community. Ms Huxley is a recognised and respected leader with strong skills to effectively engage and maximise participation with Queensland First Nations people.

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Nicole Lovato

Associate Professor, Adelaide Institute for Sleep Health, Flinders University
Associate Professor Lovato is a Senior Practitioner Research Fellow and Psychologist (provisional) at the Adelaide Institute for Sleep Health, Flinders University. She has extensive experience in insomnia and circadian physiology. Her research is particularly focused on the development of new, innovative therapeutic interventions and models of care for the management of chronic insomnia and circadian rhythm sleep disorders and associated chronic mental and physical ill-health. She works closely with consumers, primary care, and other key stakeholders to translate this knowledge to make best-practice sleep healthcare accessible and cost-effective for the community.
She is co-Chair of the Chronobiology Council of the Australasian Sleep Association (ASA), Australia’s peak advocacy body representing clinicians, scientists, and researchers in sleep medicine. A/Prof Lovato’s professional leadership has shaped practice change with the inclusion of chronobiology in education modules and guidelines for the management of chronic insomnia. She is co-inventor and holds patents for a sleep disorders diagnostic tool.

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Nicole Lynch

Clinical Nurse Specialist and Visiting Professor of Nursing, Purdue University
Nicole Lynch, DNP, MSN, CNS/APN, RNC-OB, CNE, serves as a Visiting Professor at Purdue Global. Holding certifications as a Clinical Specialist and Nurse Educator, Lynch's impactful contributions span clinical practice, nursing education, publication, and curriculum development. With over two decades in Maternal Child Nursing and certification in Inpatient Obstetrics, she brings extensive experience to her endeavors. Lynch's authority extends to her authorship of articles and presentations on pregnancy, parenthood, and nursing leadership. Her commitment further shines through volunteering for the Postpartum Depression Alliance of Illinois. On a personal level, Lynch confronted her own Postpartum Depression and Anxiety following the birth of her children 17 and 19 years ago. Through outpatient treatment, she witnessed the profound effects of this mental health condition firsthand.

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Nicole MacKenzie

PhD Candidate in Clinical Psychology, Dalhousie University
Nicole MacKenzie is a PhD candidate in Clinical Psychology at Dalhousie University. She is also a scholar in Dalhousie's OpenThink training initiative. Her research is focused on knowledge mobilization and implementation science within the field of pediatric pain. Her current research is interested in how different health care partners (e.g., health professionals, researchers, patient/caregivers) work collaboratively to put evidence into action within children's pain.

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Nicole Miller

Associate Professor of Elementary and Middle School Education, Mississippi State University
Nicole C. Miller is an associate professor of elementary and middle level education in the Department of Teacher Education and Leadership at Mississippi State University. She engages in research and service activities focused on teacher preparation, middle level education, rural education, technology integration, and teaching with primary sources.

Miller holds a Doctor of Philosophy in Curriculum and Instruction from Mississippi State University. She holds a Master of Arts in Education degree with a concentration in instructional technology from California State University, Northridge. She earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science from the University of California, Los Angeles.

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Nicole O'Byrne

Associate Professor, Faculty of Law, University of New Brunswick
Ph.D. Law and Society (UVic), LL.M. (McGill), LL.B. (Saskatchewan), B.A. (Hons) (Regina), B.Sc. (Queen’s)

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Nicole Pankiewicz

Assistant Professor of Political Science, College of Coastal Georgia
I have been an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the College of Coastal Georgia since 2020. I have a PhD in Government from the University of Virginia (2017), a master's degree in Mass Communication, and an MLIS. Before coming to Coastal Georgia I was at the University of Utah, and before that I spent two and a half years as a Visiting Assistant Professor at Miami University of Ohio.

My current interest in political science is the U.S. space program; I've taught a course on the space program at Miami University and at Coastal Georgia. I am working on an article about the importance of teaching the space program to college and university students, who know little about its politics and history. I advocate for the space program as an excellent focus for a political science course, no matter what subfield is being taught.

This semester (Spring 2023) I'm teaching a course on politics and science fiction in addition to teaching an introductory-level American Government course.

My dissertation research explored Americans' understanding of citizenship and what it takes to be considered a "good" citizen (the top answers in my survey research were obeying the law, paying taxes, and contributing to society).

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