Menu

Search

Jennifer R. Whitson

Associate Professor, Sociology and Legal Studies, University of Waterloo
Jennifer Whitson is a sociologist who researches the secret life of software, the people who make it, and how both change our daily lives. Her current projects centre on digital media incubators, indie game makers, and on the surveillance implications of data-driven design, respectively

She's particularly interested in the shifting production models of the global game industry, and tracing how risk management practices, data mining, and digital distribution shape developers' creative work and the larger cultural role of games.

The design, deployment, and use of communication software is shaped by economic, social, technological and political concerns, which then create certain constraints and affordances in how people can use these technologies. For example, her work on gamification traces how governance and control are designed into games, smartphones, and websites, and how playful rationalities are used to shape user behaviour and thus govern through freedom and pleasure rather than fear and risk.

Most recently, she is conducting ethnographic work inside game studios and with developer communities to learn about the struggle for new media producers to find a balance between creative work and economic sustainability, asking "In a 'sharing' community where most digital products like games are low-cost/free, how do we do what we love while still managing to pay the rent?"

  More

Less

Jenny Adams

Jenny Adams, Associate Professor, holds a Ph.D. and an A.M. in English Literature from the University of Chicago, and a B.A. in English Literature and French Language and Literature from UCLA. She specializes in later medieval literature, and her current research focuses on medieval student debt and university life in England. She is at work on a monograph provisionally titled “Unlocking St. Frideswide’s Chest: Student Debt and University Life in Medieval Oxford.” With Nancy Bradbury (Smith College) she is also editing an essay collection titled “Objects of Medieval Women.” Her past research has been on chess and political organization in the late Middle Ages, and she has articles on this and other subjects in Studies in the Age of Chaucer, the Journal of English Germanic Philology, Essays in Medieval Studies, The Chaucer Review, Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Teaching, and the Journal of Popular Culture. Her book, Power Play: The Literature and Politics of Chess in the Late Middle Ages (University of Pennsylvania Press) appeared in 2006, and her edition of William Caxton's The Game and Playe of the Chesse (TEAMS Middle English Texts series) came out in 2009. She has received fellowships from the NEH, the ACLS, and the Newberry Library.

  More

Less

Jenny Berger

Post-Doctoral researcher, University of Reading
Background in sustainable built environments. I research the role of indoor plants in healthy building design. Investigating experimentally, the impact of plants on indoor air quality in real environments and their impact on the well-being of building occupants. PhD in The impact of plants on indoor air quality and the wellbeing of occupants. I also studied a MSc in Renewable Energy.

  More

Less

Jenny Cantlay

PhD Candidate in Avian Sensory Ecology, Royal Holloway University of London
My doctoral research focuses on avian sensory ecology and its application to conservation science. More specifically, I am combining avian visual and behavioural ecology to examine the problem of waterbirds’ fatal interactions with man-made hazards, including gill nets and wind turbines, in underwater and aerial environments.

This project will increase understanding about the visual abilities of waterbirds, and species’ behavioural responses to novel visual stimuli. I am measuring the visual fields of a wide range of waterbird species with varied foraging behaviour to provide an interspecific comparative evaluation of their visual field characteristics. This will help me to determine how their visual fields may influence their susceptibility to fishing net entrapment and collisions. I have also conducted an experiment in an aquatic environment to assess the behaviour of sea ducks to LED lights, a proposed mitigation measure for bycatch reduction.

The aim of this project is to utilise a sensory ecology approach to examine avian hazard susceptibility and inform the development of technological solutions to reduce bird mortalities.

  More

Less

Jenny Jenkins

Assistant Professor, Department of Earth Sciences, Durham University
My current focus is on imaging strange and poorly understood features sitting on the core-mantle boundary of the Earth known as ultra-low velocity zones (ULVZs). ULVZs are small in size, 100s by 10s km, but show huge reductions in seismic wave speed compared to the rest of the mantle (10-50%). We currently have very little understanding about what these features are or what effect they have on the large scale convective mantle processes. My current work looks at developing new seismic imaging techniques to better map out the detailed shape and characteristics of ULVZs, with the aim of identifying their underlying cause.

  More

Less

Jenny Judge

Lecturer in Philosophy of Mind and Cognitive Science, The University of Melbourne
I’m a Lecturer (i.e. assistant professor) in philosophy.

I hold a PhD in philosophy from New York University and a PhD in music from the University of Cambridge.

My research explores the place of music, and musical experience, in human mentality at large. I'm currently developing a novel theory of musical meaning, according to which a piece of expressive music is a moving picture of feeling. On this view, a piece of expressive music is as good a candidate as a picture for having representational content -- and the widespread assumption that music lacks representational content is therefore misplaced. I'm working on a series of papers wherein I defend this 'representational' view of musical expression against objections, and explore its potential for explaining the communicative and social significance of music.

In addition to my work on music, I also write about the impact of digital technology on our encounters with value: in particular, the moral value of others and the aesthetic value of artworks. I'm particularly interested in mapping the different kinds of attention involved in moral and aesthetic experiences, and how these forms of attention are being directed and shaped by today's Internet.

I am an active musician, and I contribute essays to the program books at both Carnegie Hall and the San Francisco Symphony.

  More

Less

Jenny Lye

Associate Professor/Reader in Economics, The University of Melbourne
Jenny has an extensive international publication record in areas of theoretical and applied econometrics and statistics. Her publications have appeared in numerous journals including the Journal of Econometrics, Journal of the American Statistical Association and The American Statistician.

Her recent research includes publications in the statistical analysis of issues in tertiary education and she is currently researching in the area of cultural economics. She is an editorial board member for the journal Econometrics and is the editor of the Perspective section in the Australian Economic Review. She has over 30 years' experience teaching econometrics and has over that time received numerous Dean's Certificates of Excellent Teaching. She is also a co-author with J. Wooldridge, M. Wadud and R. Joyeux of the textbook Introductory Econometrics: Asia Pacific Edition, 2nd edition. In the past she has also presented short econometric courses at the Federal Australian Treasury as well as for the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet and Department of Natural Resources and the Environment.

  More

Less

Jenny McGuire

Research Scientist in Biology, Georgia Institute of Technology

In the McGuire Lab at the School of Biology we are interested in posing hypotheses about the evolutionary and ecological implications of climate change and using the rich paleontological record of the last several million years to test those hypotheses.

  More

Less

Jenny Paterson

Assistant Professor in Psychology, Northumbria University, Newcastle
Jenny is an experimental social psychologist with a specific interest in understanding and alleviating the intergroup and interpersonal impacts of prejudice.

  More

Less

Jenny Radesky

Associate Professor of Pediatrics, University of Michigan
I am a developmental behavioral pediatrician focused on low-income urban patient populations. I am also a researcher of digital technology and early childhood development.

  More

Less

Jenny Stewart

Professor of Public Policy, UNSW Sydney
Public policy analyst, later academic in public policy and public administration at the University of Canberra, finally Professor of Public Policy at the University of New South Wales at ADFA.
Author of 'The lie of the level playing field' (Text Publishing, 1994); 'Renegotiating the environment: the power of politics' (Federation Press, 2003); 'Public policy values' (Palgrave Macmillan 2009).

  More

Less

Jenny Wagner

Research Scientist in Cosmology, Bahamas Advanced Study Institute & Conferences

  More

Less

Jenny Whilde

Adjunct Research Scientist in Marine Bioscience, University of Florida
I earned a B.Sc. in Natural Sciences from Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland, where I developed an interest in animal behavior, marine biology, and conservation. I then obtained a M.Sc. in Evolutionary and Behavioural Ecology from the University of Exeter, UK and subsequently returned to Trinity College, Dublin to undertake my Ph.D., focusing on social group dynamics in zoo-housed animals, including elephants and orangutans. I have many years of experience in scientific research across a broad range of disciplines including behavioral ecology, cancer research, and marine biology.

  More

Less

Jenny Williams

Professor of Economics, The University of Melbourne
I am a Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of Melbourne. My research focuses on empirically studying the causes and consequences of risky behaviours. I use both survey data and administrative data in seeking to better understand people's behaviours, and the impact that policy has on behaviours.

I am particularly interested in evaluating the impact of policy on decisions about substance use and crime, as well as understanding how these decisions affect other areas of life, including mental health, work, and schooling.

  More

Less

Jens Walter

Professor at the School of Microbiology, University College Cork
Jens Walter serves as the Professor of Ecology, Food, and the Microbiome at Unviersity College Cork and the APC Microbiome Ireland. His expertise lies at the interface of evolutionary ecology of the gut microbiome and human nutrition. His research focuses on the evolutionary and ecological processes that have shaped host-microbiome symbiosis and the translation of basic microbiome science into therapeutic and nutritional strategies. Dr. Walter and his collaborators have pioneered the application of ecological theory to elucidate ecological and nutritional factors that shape gut microbiomes and have achieved targeted modulations of microbiomes via dietary strategies and live microbes. Prof. Walter has published >150 peer-reviewed publications and is a ‘highly cited researcher’ according to the analytics company Clarivate.

Prof. Walter’s research has been featured on six occasions in the research highlights of Nature and Nature Reviews journals, and he has participated in several invitation-only workshops and think-tanks of the NIH, CIFAR (Canadian-based global organization that convenes extraordinary minds to address the most important questions facing science and humanity; https://www.cifar.ca/) and ILSI to discuss imminent issues of the microbiome field. He has led several provocative science commentaries with other opinion leaders that inter alia challenged current paradigms in the microbiome field that required critical assessment, such as the exaggeration of causal claims (Cell, 2020, 180:221-232), the definition of prebiotics (Nat Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2015, 12:303-10), use of ‘human microbiota-associated mice’ (Cell Host and Microbe 2016, 19:575-578), and the ‘prenatal in utero microbiome’ (Microbiome 2017, 5(1):48 and Microbiome 2021, 9(1):5).

  More

Less

Jens Zinke

Professor of Palaeobiology, University of Leicester
I received my undergraduate degree (BSc) in Geology (1994) as well as his Master degree in Geology and Paleontology (1996) from Freie Universität Berlin (Germany). In 2000 I obtained my PhD degree (Magna Cum Laude) from Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel (Germany). I have worked in four countries as postdoc and Assistant Professor before joining Leicester as Professor in 2018. I have been awarded over five million Euro in funding for research projects in the UK Germany Australia and the Netherlands committed to carrying out cutting-edge research using quantitative field and laboratory methods for sedimentological paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatological reconstructions of coral reef and island systems as well as land-ocean coupling mechanisms in the Indian Ocean region the tropical Atlantic and Southeast Asia.

My research involves the geochemical study of marine biological (massive corals) and sedimentary archives from the tropical oceans as recorders of environmental and climate change over the past 300 years and during the Holocene. For most of my career I have worked on Indian Ocean coral and sediment records. This work is motivated by the need to produce reliable long-term baseline data of sea surface temperature ocean currents and the hydrological cycle over the tropical/subtropical oceans and how they shape patterns of biodiversity in our oceans and adjacent coasts. My current aspiration is to establish an international research group focussed on tropical paleoclimate research around flagship research areas where climate variability and change is of global and regional significance with the impetus on gaining more robust research output for the benefit of society. A Royal Society Wolfson Fellowship, a NERC Discovery Grant and a German DFG research grant awarded between 2018 and 2021 support my current Professorship at the University of Leicester.

  More

Less

Jeremiah Favara

Assistant Professor of Communication Studies, Gonzaga University
Jeremiah Favara (he/him/his) is a feminist media studies scholar whose research and teaching focus on intersecting dynamics of gender, race, sexuality, and class in media production and representations. His work is guided by feminist theory, intersectionality, and queer of color critique and has been published in Communication, Culture, and Critique, Feminist Media Studies, Critical Military Studies, and Ada: A Journal of Gender, New Media, and Technology. He is currently completing a manuscript, titled Tactical Inclusion: Difference & Vulnerability in U.S. Military Advertising.

  More

Less

Jérémie Boudreault

Étudiant-chercheur au doctorat en science des données et santé environnementale, Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS)
Je suis actuellement étudiant-chercheur au doctorat en science des données et santé environnementale au Centre Eau Terre et Environnement de l'Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) et Boursier d'impact sur le système de santé (BISS) en intelligence artificielle à l'Institut national de santé publique du Québec (INSPQ), à Québec, au Canada. Mes recherches portent sur la modélisation des impacts du changement climatique, tels que les chaleurs extrêmes et les inondations, sur les personnes et les écosystèmes, à l'aide d'approches basées sur la science des données.

  More

Less

Jérémie Théolier

Professionel de recherche en sciences des aliments, Université Laval
Jérémie Theolier est titulaire d'un doctorat en Microbiologie Alimentaire de l'Université Laval et d'un diplôme d'ingénieur français en sécurité alimentaire et microbiologie des aliments (ESIAB).

Il travaille dans l'équipe du professeur Godefroy depuis 2017, sur des thématiques d'analyse de risques alimentaires, comprenant entre autres, les allergènes, les métaux lourds et les mycotoxines.

  More

Less

Jeremy Bird

Research Associate, Ecology and Biodiversity, University of Tasmania
I was awarded a PhD for me research into the conservation ecology of a threatened guild of seabirds, the petrels, on subantarctic Macquarie Island, tracking their recovery in response to invasive species management. I currently research seabirds around Tasmania including in the Southern Ocean.

  More

Less

Jeremy deWaard

Adjunct Professor, Centre for Biodiversity Genomics, University of Guelph
Jeremy deWaard is the Associate Director for Collections at the Centre for Biodiversity Genomics at the University of Guelph in Guelph, Canada. He completed his undergraduate and MSc degrees in Guelph, followed by his PhD at the University of British Columbia. He is now responsible for leading a team of thirty staff and students, managing a natural history collection of nearly nine million invertebrate specimens, and overseeing the operations and research initiatives linked to the acquisition and processing of specimens for DNA barcode analysis. His research focuses on biological inventories, biosurveillance, protocol development, and the integrative systematics of terrestrial arthropods, particularly macromoths. He is an Adjunct Professor at the University of Guelph, a Subject Editor for The Canadian Entomologist, a Research Associate at the Smithsonian Institution, and a board member of the Arthropods Specialist Subcommittee for the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada.

  More

Less

Jeremy Hicks

Professor of Russian Culture and Film, Queen Mary University of London
Jeremy Hicks is a historian of Russian culture and film at QMUL. His research interests are in the history of documentary film in Russia and the former Soviet Union. He has also published on Soviet film during World War Two, representations of the Holocaust in Russian and Soviet film, the documentary film pioneer, Dziga Vertov and connections between Soviet film and humanitarian film
He received a PhD from SSEES-UCL in 2000, and has been teaching at Queen Mary since 1998.

  More

Less

Jeremy Kiszka

Associate Professor, Institute of Environment, Coastlines and Oceans Division, Florida International University
Marine mammals are highly charismatic species. They feed at a variety of trophic levels, occur from coastal to open-ocean ecosystems, and are found across virtually all latitudes. Due to their high historical - and sometimes present-day - abundances, capability for large-scale movements and highly variable metabolic rates, they have the potential to affect the structure and function of ecosystems through a variety of mechanisms over both ecological and evolutionary time. They also face major conservation challenges at the global scale due to bycatch, overfishing, habitat destruction and climate change.

Dr. Kiszka is a community and behavioral ecologist who studies the ecological roles and importance of marine mammals in marine ecosystems. More specifically, he investigates how they use habitats and resources (their ecological roles) and how ecosystems can be affected by the presence of these animals, which includes their top down effects on resources and behavior, as well as nutrient dynamics. His work involves the use and development of new and innovative research tools and methods to study marine mammal ecology and conservation issues, particularly since these species are so challenging to observe. Through research and education, he also creates outreach tools and works on providing opportunities for students from minority groups and developing countries to build capacity.

  More

Less

Jérémy Mandin

Postdoctoral researcher in anthropology and social science , Université de Liège

  More

Less

Jérémy Puyraimond-Zemmour

Assistant spécialiste, Service de Diabétologie-Nutrition, Hôpital Bichat, AP-HP, Chargé de cours au sein du DU de nutrition, Université Paris Cité

  More

Less

Jeremy P. Shapiro

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychological Sciences, Case Western Reserve University
Jeremy Shapiro is an adjunct assistant professor of psychological sciences at Case Western Reserve University and the author, most recently, of “Psychotherapeutic Diagrams: Pathways, Spectrums, Feedback Loops, and the Search for Balance.”

I am a consultant on outcome research, program development and evaluation, a psychotherapist, and a national trainer (over 200 one-day workshops in over 40 states). My recent books include a graduate school textbook, "Child and Adolescent Therapy: Science and Art, 2nd Edition," and "Psychotherapeutic Diagrams: Pathways, Spectrums, Feedback Loops, and the Search for Balance."

  More

Less

Jeroen van Boxtel

Associate professor, University of Canberra
Jeroen J.A. van Boxtel started with a master's degrees in Biology (Utrecht University) and Cognitive Sciences (Université Pierre et Marie Curie & Collège de France, France), after which he completed his PhD at Utrecht University, the Netherlands, at the cross-disciplinary Helmholtz Institute in 2008. After obtaining his PhD, he moved to the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), where he worked for two years on the relationship between attention and consciousness with Prof. Christof Koch. In 2010, he moved to the University of California, Los Angeles, to work on questions related to human action perception and attention, and the link to Autism Spectrum Disorders. In 2013, Jeroen van Boxtel was recruited to Monash University where he also headed the Cognitive Neuroimaging group at Monash Biomedical Imaging. He currently works in the Discipline of Psychology at the University of Canberra, and focuses on the negative effects of attention, the link between attention and conscious perception, the influence of attention on biological motion perception, and the influence of noise on visual processing.

  More

Less

Jerome N Rachele

Dr Jerome Rachele is a Research Fellow at the Institute for Health and Ageing, Australian Catholic University and the NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence in Healthy, Liveable Communities. His research centres on investigating causal relationships between built environment and health and wellbeing outcomes using data from longitudinal studies and natural experiments.

  More

Less

Jérôme Queste

Sociologue, Cirad
Jérôme Queste had a first batch of academic education in applied mathematics and information sciences he studied in Ecole Polytechnique and ENSTA (now Université Paris-Saclay). Later on, his field research led him to invest in social sciences to better understand the way social interactions contribute to change. He ended up defending a PhD in social sciences entitled "The effects of consultation".

Jérôme Queste has been working in Madagascar for 20 years, coodrinating research on "How to combine conservation and valuation of forest biodiversity in Madagascar"

  More

Less

Jerry Anderson

Dean and Professor of Law, Drake University
Jerry Anderson is Dean of the Drake University Law School and Richard M. and Anita Calkins Distinguished Professor of Law. His areas of expertise include Administrative Law, Environmental Law, Natural Resources Law, and Property.

  More

Less

Jerry Kang

Distinguished Professor of Law and (by courtesy) Asian American Studies; Founding Vice Chancellor for Equity, Diversity and Inclusion (2015-20), University of California, Los Angeles
Jerry Kang is Distinguished Professor of Law at UCLA. He graduated magna cum laude from both Harvard College (physics) and Harvard Law School, where he was a supervising editor of the Harvard Law Review. After clerking for the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, he started his professorship at UCLA in 1995. A leading scholar on implicit bias and critical race studies, Professor Kang collaborates broadly across disciplines and industries on scholarly, educational, and advocacy projects. An inspiring teacher, he has received UCLA’s highest recognition: the Eby Art of Teaching Distinguished Teaching Award. During 2015-20, he served as the University’s Founding Vice Chancellor for Equity, Diversity and Inclusion.

  More

Less

Jerry McManus

Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Columbia University
Jerry McManus is a Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences and a paleoceanographer. His research includes using deep-sea sediments to reconstruct past changes in the Earth’s climate and the large-scale ocean circulation, with a special focus on the role that the ocean plays in abrupt climate change. He has spent nearly a year of his life at sea and is involved in research projects in far-flung locales in every ocean basin. After 10 years at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, he returned to Columbia and Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory in 2008.

  More

Less

Jerry Paul Sheppard

Associate Professor of Business Administration, Simon Fraser University
My research interest deals principally with the theme of "why do things seem to go wrong?" My research involves global environment, institutional failings stemming from corporate governance issues, industry sector change, organizational failure, in-apt individual decision making failures and decision failures.

  More

Less

Jesmen Mendoza

Psychologist and Faculty Member, Toronto Metropolitan University
I am an Instructor at the University of Toronto's Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, where I teach graduate students in the Department of Applied Psychology & Human Development.

I am also at Toronto Metropolitan University (TMU), providing therapy to students, training psychology residents and practicum students, and consulting with faculty and staff on complex student issues.

Between 2010 and the early part of 2022, I've have been a member of the University's Student Case Management Team which assists in supporting students of concerns and those students in conflict with the University's conduct and sexual violence policies. While on that team, I've provided risk assessments and disciplinary counselling to students who have been found to have caused harm. I'm also an Associate of Possibilities Seeds, a social change consultancy dedicated to gender justice and equity, since 2018. As an Associate of Possibilities Seeds, I've provided leadership and scholarship in their community of practice with respect to people who have caused harm, and created a number of policy response and support tools for effectively responding to campus sexual and gender-based violence for Canadian Post-Secondary Institutions. Prior to coming to TMU and since 2000, I've provided clinical support in a variety of social service and criminal justice settings, and apply an integrated, inclusive and positive psychology approach to the work I provide.

  More

Less

Jess Carniel

Professional Memberships:

Secretary of the Cultural Studies Association of Australasia
Australian and New Zealand Shakespeare Association (member)

Research Interests:

Australian and global migration, multiculturalism, race and ethnicity, cultural studies, sport (esp. soccer), popular culture, Australian studies, Eurovision, gender studies.

Most Recent Research Outcomes:

"Skirting the issue: finding queer and geopolitical belonging at the Eurovision Song Contest," Contemporary Southeastern Europe, vol. 2, no. 1 (2015), pp. 136-154.

Review of Tony Bennett (ed.), Challenging (the) humanities, (Melbourne: Australian Scholarly Publishing, 2013), Queensland Review, vol. 21, no. 2 (December 2014), pp. 235-236.

“Of Nerds and Men: Dimensions and Discourses of Masculinity in Nerds FC,” in The Sports Documentary: Critical Essays, eds Zachary Inglis and David Sutera, Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press, 2013.

“In the spirit of reconciliation: migrating spirits and Australian postcolonial multiculturalism in Hoa Pham’s Vixen,” in Spectral Identities: Ghosting in Literature and Film, eds Melanie Anderson and Lisa Sloan, Newark: University of Delaware Press, 2013.

  More

Less

  11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20   
  • Market Data
Close

Welcome to EconoTimes

Sign up for daily updates for the most important
stories unfolding in the global economy.