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Music collectors seek out rare albums not available on streaming

By Marina Eckersley

As of the third quarter of 2019, music streaming giant Spotify had 113 million paid subscribers worldwide but its still missing some famous albums that many listeners feel they cant live without. And in todays digital...

Legal win doesn't mean Ontario student associations are in the clear

By David Said

The Ontario governments so-called Student Choice Initiative was recently declared unlawful following a court challenge launched by the Canadian Federation of Students and the York Federation of Students. The Ontario...

Chronic pain, a silent yet devastating disease in the workplace

By Guillaume Soenen

Back, neck, wrist or neuropathic pain, sciatica, restless-legs syndrome… In France, one person out of three suffers from chronic pain. According to academic research, 15 to 20% of the adult population suffers from...

Antibiotic resistance is an even greater challenge in remote Indigenous communities

By Asha Bowen Et Al

Antibiotic-resistant infections already cause at least 700,000 deaths globally every year. Although the phenomenon is most concerning for serious infections people are admitted to hospital with, antibiotic resistance...

How our screen stories of the future went from flying cars to a darker version of now

By Aaron Burton

Fans of Ridley Scotts 1982 masterpiece Blade Runner returned to cinemas last month for an unusual milestone: history catching up with science fiction. Blade Runner opens in Los Angeles, in November 2019. Furnaces burst...

The problem with transport models is political abuse, not their use in planning

By Eric Keys Et Al

This is the second article in a series to mark the 50th anniversary of the landmark Melbourne Transportation Plan. Transport models are often singled out as a barrier to providing more sustainable and equitable...

Greenwashing? Why wildlife TV is finally engaging with the climate emergency

By Jean-Baptiste Gouyon

The BBCs new wildlife television series featuring David Attenborough, Seven Worlds, One Planet, marks a drastic departure from previous programmes. For the first time, the presenter can be heard repeatedly uttering the...

Social deprivation linked to changes in eating styles in early childhood

By Alice Kininmonth Et Al

Childhood obesity rates are high in the UK, but not all children are affected equally a familys wealth makes a big difference to a childs risk. Rates of overweight and obesity among children are twice as high in the...

Payday lenders have embraced installment loans to evade regulations – but they may be even worse

By Paige Marta Skiba Et Al

Installment loans seem like a kinder, gentler version of their predatory cousin, the payday loan. But for consumers, they may be even more harmful. Use of the installment loan, in which a consumer borrows a lump sum and...

Election 2019: what's at play in Northern Ireland?

By James Pow

Northern Ireland is well known for its deep divisions. But as the 2019 general election approaches its five main political parties are united on at least one thing strong opposition to the Brexit deal negotiated by Boris...

How to design a forest fit to heal the planet

By Heather Plumpton

Reforestation has enormous potential as a cheap and natural way of sucking heat-absorbing carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere and restoring the degraded natural world, while supporting local livelihoods at the same time....

How randomised trials became big in development economics

By Seán Mfundza Muller Et Al

The 2019 Nobel Prize in economics was awarded to three researchers for their experimental approach to alleviating global poverty, one which has transformed development economics. What are randomised experiments? And why...

Job losses expected as NZ's broadcasting sector faces biggest overhaul in a decade

By Merja Myllylahti

New Zealands broadcasting sector, both public and commercial, is facing the biggest structural upheaval in a decade. The latest report on New Zealand media ownership, compiled by the Journalism, Media and Democracy...

Litigation is the real reason financial reports are becoming harder to read

By Mark Humphery-Jenner

Westpac can expect a bumper turnout of shareholders at its annual general meeting in Sydney on Thursday, many of them angry at its alleged role in facilitating child exploitation in the Philippines, its 23 million alleged...

Finally, your electricity bill looks set to fall. Here's how much you could save

By Tim Nelson Et Al

Household electricity bills in Australia have increased sharply in the past decade. But new official figures show they are projected to fall markedly - in some cases by 20%. In-house modelling we conducted at the...

What is sodium lauryl sulfate and is it safe to use?

By Yousuf Mohammed

If youve ever Googled the causes of a skin complaint or damaged hair, chances are someone on the internet has pointed the finger at SLS, or sodium lauryl (or laureth) sulfate, a common ingredient in beauty products,...

Science needs true diversity to succeed -- and Australian astronomy shows how we can get it

By Lisa Kewley

Australian astronomy punches well above its weight, in terms of the research it leads and the facilities it houses. We have made remarkable discoveries in the past year alone. Our scientists have recently narrowed down...

How minority governments can influence foreign policy

By Adam Chapnick Et Al

When Stephen Harpers government was defeated in 2015, we tried to figure out what drove its thinking on foreign policy. We did so by comparing the governments approach to a variety of international issues before and after...

The story behind the world's first private refugee sponsorship program

By David Pfrimmer

Forty years ago, an estimated three million Cambodian, Hmong, Laotian, Vietnamese and ethnic Chinese people fled their homes following the Indochina wars. Hundreds of thousands died. Many suffered brutal repression. Many...

The digital economy's environmental footprint is threatening the planet

By Raynold Wonder Alorse

Modern society has given significant attention to the promises of the digital economy over the past decade. But it has given little attention to its negative environmental footprint. Our smartphones rely on rare earth...

Pop culture: restoring Namibia's forgotten resistance music

By Henning Melber

There is a rich history of 20th century music in Namibia that was suppressed and all but erased by political forces. Now an archive project called Stolen Moments Namibian Music History Untold is restoring it to the public...

A useful guide for CEOs on how to make ethical decisions in business

By Kenneth Amaeshi

Chief executive officers (CEOs), like ordinary citizens, are driven by their values and convictions. These may not necessarily be just good for business. Examples abound. Tim Cook, CEO of Apple, speaks strongly for the...

Kenya's tax on digital trade and services: what's known and not known

By Mercy Muendo

Kenya will start levying new tax on digital markets under a new law signed by the president early in November. The Finance Act seeks to broaden the Income Tax Act net to include income accruing through a digital market...

Global and historical lessons on how land reforms have unfolded

By Ben Cousins

What can South Africa learn about land reforms from wider global and historical experiences in the 20th century? Most land reforms have involved transferring rights of ownership from wealthy landlords to poor, small-scale...

Flash flooding is a serious threat in the UK – here's how scientists are tackling its prediction

By Christopher J White Et Al

Its becoming a familiar scene on the news: sodden British people wading through streets up to their knees in flood water. From Stirling to Sheffield, many parts of the UK in 2019 felt the impact of severe surface water...

How do you know when it's time to break up? Here's the research

By Veronica Lamarche

Christmas may be a time of giving, but its also a peak time for break-ups. Facing the prospect of spending yet another festive season with their romantic partner, many people start having doubts about their relationship in...

How to spot fake news this election

By Amy Binns

The 2019 UK election campaign has been particularly dispiriting for anyone who cares about the truth. Even established parties have proven they are not above using tricks to manipulate the news. Meanwhile, politicians are...

Brexit Britain: was Jane Austen an original little Englander?

By Thomas McLean

In revealing the charms and follies of genteel English society, Jane Austen has few competitors. Yet as Britain limps towards Brexit, I cant help wondering why there are no foreigners in her major fiction. Many thousands...

American influence could take the hit as Putin, Zelenskiy try to make peace in Donbass

By Erik C. Nisbet Et Al

President Vladimir Putin of Russia and his Ukrainian counterpart, Volodymyr Zelenskiy, are set to meet Dec. 9 as part of efforts to end conflict in the separatist-controlled territories of Donbass. Zelenskiys electoral...

Why the US military usually punishes misconduct but police often close ranks

By Dwight Stirling

Many U.S. military members publicly disavowed President Trumps decision to pardon Edward Gallagher, the former SEAL commando convicted of killing a teenage detainee in Iraq in 2017. Gallaghers alleged war crimes were...

What makes Christmas movies so popular

By S. Brent Rodriguez-Plate

If you are one of those people who will settle in this evening with a hot cup of apple cider to watch a holiday movie, you are not alone. Holiday movies have become firmly embedded in Americans winter celebrations. The...

Hypnobirthing: can using self-hypnosis techniques reduce pain during childbirth?

By Kenneth Finlayson

The latest celebrity-endorsed health trend is the bizarre-sounding practice of hypnobirthing. Backed by the likes of Gisele Bundchen, Jessica Alba and, reportedly, Kate Middleton, women are using self-hypnosis to help them...

What would Russia prefer to happen in the UK election?

By Alexander Titov

The UK election comes against the background of one of the worst periods in Russian-British relations since the end of the Cold War. Badly shaken by the 2006 poisoning of the former Russian spy Alexander Litvinenko in...

Emails outside working hours: are they against employment law?

By Darius Whelan

It is common for many employees to send, read and reply to work emails at all hours of the day and night, including weekends. This change in work culture developed in recent decades and has accelerated with the advent of...

This small German town took back the power – and went fully renewable

By Bertie Russell

The case for ambitious and transformative environmental policy is being made with increasing fervour and a series of Green New Deals a reference to Roosevelts economic reform programme in the 1930s have been proposed...

China's failed gene-edited baby experiment proves we're not ready for human embryo modification

By Dimitri Perrin Et Al

More than a year ago, the world was shocked by Chinese biophysicist He Jiankuis attempt to use CRISPR technology to modify human embryos and make them resistant to HIV, which led to the birth of twins Lulu and...

British Columbia's vaping crackdown could offer a roadmap for the rest of the world

By Christopher Labos

In Canada, the government of British Columbia is cracking down on vaping products. The plan is to reduce nicotine content, limit access to flavoured pods, mandate plain packaging with health warnings and raise the tax on...

Economic democracy: why handing power back to the people will fix our broken system

By Andrew Cumbers

Behind the superficial froth of the UK election campaign, the competing parties are offering fundamentally different visions of the economy, who controls it and who benefits from it. The Conservatives and, to some extent,...

South African Airways is in business rescue: what it means, and what next

By Marius Pretorius

South African President Cyril Ramaphosa has taken the decision to put South African Airways, the cash-strapped national flag carrier, into voluntary business rescue. Caroline Southey from the Conversation Africa asked...

'Stop-and-frisk' can work, under careful supervision

By Henry F. Fradella Et Al

In mid-November, former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg apologized publicly for his backing of a practice intended to reduce violent crime that had for years been criticized as racially biased. I realize back then I...

A global downturn looks likely, yet it's being totally ignored in the UK election

By Peter Bloom

For all the marked policy differences between the different parties in the UK election, they share a common blindspot. They all seem to assume that the UK is the sole determiner of its economic fate. There is nothing in...

Manchester City v Manchester United: a battle for ideological dominance

By Simon Chadwick

The Manchester derby is always a key clash in the Premier League calendar and all eyes will be on the Etihad Stadium when City take on United, as the two footballing giants face-off for the first time this season. Yet the...

Hong Kong: when the citizen-birds rebel

By Frédéric Keck

Over the past year, a number of nations around the world have been the scene of tumultuous popular protests, including Lebanon, Algeria, Bolivia, Chile and even France. While the protests in Hong Kong bear some...

To stop a tech apocalypse we need ethics and the arts

By Sara James Et Al

If recent television shows are anything to go by, were a little concerned about the consequences of technological development. Dystopian narratives abound. Black Mirror projects the negative consequences of social...

Why Americans are staying put, instead of moving to a new city or state

By Thomas Cooke

The story of America is one of moving. A total of 13.6% of Americans today were born in another country, and most of us are descended from immigrants. This story of migration also includes moving within the country....

GDP update: spending dips and saving soars as we stash rather than spend our tax cuts

By Peter Martin1

Australians saved rather than spent most of the budget tax cuts, almost doubling the proportion of household income saved, leaving spending languishing. The September quarter national accounts show that in the first...

Fingerprint login would be a more secure defence for our data, if we used it properly

By Nalin Asanka Gamagedara Ar

Our electronic devices store a plethora of sensitive information. To protect this information, device operating systems such as Apples iOS and Android have locking mechanisms. These require user authentication before...

The top ranking education systems in the world aren't there by accident. Here's how Australia can climb up

By Julie Sonnemann

The latest OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) results show a long-term decline in reading, maths and science skills for Australian students. In 2018, Australian 15 years olds performed more than...

Global emissions to hit 36.8 billion tonnes, beating last year's record high

By Pep Canadell Et Al

Global emissions for 2019 are predicted to hit 36.8 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide (CO₂), setting yet another all-time record. This disturbing result means emissions have grown by 62% since international climate...

Love it or hate it, Tesla's Cybertruck is revolutionary

By Michael D. Mehta

With a collective gasp and puzzled looks, the world was recently introduced to Teslas newest vehicle. The so-called Cybertruck is an angular, stainless steel, all-electric pickup truck that quickly became...

2019 was a year of global unrest, spurred by anger at rising inequality – and 2020 is likely to be worse

2019 may well go down as the most disrupted year in global politics since the fall of the Berlin wall in 1989 and the subsequent implosion of the former Soviet Union. However, the likelihood is that 2020 will be worse,...

FxWirePro: Asian markets in red, gold trades flat at $1,460 mark

04:39 AM| Commentary

All the major Asian indices were trading on a lower note on Tuesday. Gold was trading around $1,460 mark while silver was trading around $16.58 mark. Japans Nikkei was trading 0.09 pct lower at 23,408.50...

U.K. economic growth likely accelerated in October, BoE likely to keep monetary policy on hold in near future

18:26 PM| Commentary

The U.K. economy is likely to have grown in October. The economic growth has seen a downshift as Brexit uncertainties seem to have finally caught up with the economy. For October the consensus forecast is for GDP to rise...

Canadian homebuilding stays sound in November, housing starts rise 0.3 pct

16:13 PM| Commentary

Canadas homebuilding stayed healthy in November, with starts coming in at 201.3k units. On a sequential basis, housing starts rose 0.3 percent sequentially in the month. Single-detached starts dropped 4 percent to 56.3k...

New Zealand’s total manufacturing sales volumes fall in Q3 2019, core manufacturing activity likely to pick up in Q4

11:51 AM| Commentary

New Zealands total manufacturing sales volumes dropped 0.3 percent quarter-on-quarter in the third quarter, after a 2.7 percent drop in the second quarter. Out of the 13 manufacturing industries, seven saw a contraction...

Polish flash inflation likely to have accelerated in November

19:23 PM| Commentary

Polish November flash inflation data is set to release this week. According to an Erste Group Research report, the flash inflation is likely to have come in at 2.6 percent year-on-year. Sharp rise in food prices continue...

U.S. non-farm payrolls rise above expectations in October, jobless rate falls to 3.5 pct

16:28 PM| Commentary

U.S. non-farm payrolls rose above expectations in October. Employment rose 266k, as compared with consensus expectations of a rise of 180k. Also, the data for prior two months was upwardly revised by 41k jobs. The jobless...

Top Stories

Key trade rules will become unenforceable from midnight. Australia should be worried

By Lisa Toohey Et Al - 05:15 AM| Insights & Views Economy

An important part of the World Trade Organization will cease to function from midnight. December 10 is when the terms of two of the remaining three members of its Appellate Body expire. It is meant to have seven. The...

Work is a fundamental part of being human. Robots won't stop us doing it

By Jean-Philippe Deranty - 05:18 AM| Insights & Views Technology

Hardly a week goes by without a report announcing the end of work as we know it. In 2013, Oxford University academics Carl Frey and Michael Osborne were the first to capture this anxiety in a paper titled: The Future of...

The $120,000 banana: how to have your art and eat it

By Amy Bryzgel - 05:19 AM| Insights & Views Entertainment

For his latest work at the international Art Basel fair, Italian artist Maurizio Cattelan bought a banana, duct-taped it to the wall of the gallery and called it Comedian. Over the weekend, American artist David Datuna...

Why freemium video games should embrace players who want to play for free

By Ahmad Beltagui Et Al - 05:20 AM| Insights & Views Entertainment

The video games industry is worth more than movies and music combined, with more than 2.5 billion players around the world. Freemium games have driven much of the success, ever since titles like Angry Birds, Farmville and...

Demonising processed food undermines our trust in science

By Alan Kelly - 05:20 AM| Insights & Views Science

I have a radical suggestion: lets ban processed and ultra-processed foods. Not the products, but the terms. With so many diet plans and nutritional instructions offering such varied advice on how to eat healthily, a...

How important is turnout in a UK election? The recent actions of the parties give you a good idea

By Christopher Kirkland - 05:20 AM| Insights & Views Politics

Britain is once again going to the polls and encouraging people to vote may be as important this year as asking them to vote for a particular party. Traditionally, low turnout has a disproportionate affect on Labour...

Econotimes Series

Economy

South Africa is missing out on fresh fruit export growth. What it needs to do

South Africas urgent need to create jobs requires that the country take advantage of opportunities in the global economy that it can convert into quick wins. The fruit industry presents such an opportunity. The countrys...

Currency manipulation and why Trump is picking on Brazil and Argentina

President Donald Trump slapped new tariffs on Brazil and Argentina after accusing them of manipulating their currencies to boost exports. It wasnt the first time Trump has labeled another country a currency manipulator...

How to protect the NHS in a post-Brexit trade deal with the US

A US-UK trade deal is being negotiated, and drug prices are a key issue. Several US officials are demanding that foreign countries pay higher prices to US drug companies. The UK government is denying that drug prices will...

Market-led infrastructure may sound good but not if it short-changes the public

The privatisation of services in Australian cities has weakened public control of key infrastructure. This is likely to accelerate as governments look to market-led proposals to provide infrastructure. For nearly three...

Comeback city? Lessons from revitalising a diverse place like Dandenong

In the 1990s, central Dandenong in Melbournes southeast was in decline. But, over the past decade and a half, this trend has been halted and in some areas reversed. Our research has identified key elements in this...

Politics

Melania Trump and Ivanka Trump are not close but there is no feud, new book suggests

The relationship of Melania Trump and Ivanka Trump behind the cameras is probably one of the most speculated aspects of the Trump family dynamic since they occupied the White House. It was then not surprising that the...

Michelle Obama did not favor the initial draft of Barack Obama's official portrait, artist reveals

It has been more than a year since the official portraits of Barack Obama and Michelle Obama were unveiled. However, a piece of interesting behind-the-scenes information was revealed on Monday by Kehinde Wiley, the artist...

Rick Perry's belief that Trump was chosen by God is shared by many in a fast-growing Christian movement

In a recent interview with Fox News, Secretary of Energy Rick Perry stated that Donald Trump was chosen by God to be president. He said throughout history God had picked imperfect people such as King David or Solomon to...

The government is hyping digitalised services, but not addressing a history of e-government fails

In politics, when you have little to show for your achievements, you can release a roadmap for what will supposedly be achieved in the future. You can look on the bright side. Use phrases such as ontology of...

UK election 2019: why the BBC's approach to the IFS is a threat to its impartiality

During the 2015 election campaign, the BBC Reality Check page asked: Why should we trust the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS)? Its a pertinent question in this election, too, as it has become almost a ritual for the BBC...

Science

Volcano eruption: Volcanic rock claimed to be releasing carbon responsible for global warming

From the various sources of carbon in the world today that are responsible for the world going through global warming, there is one unexpected source. A study claims that volcanic rocks are also contributing to the global...

Climate change: Scientists develop carbon dioxide-eating bacteria

As people continue to take to the streets and protest in order to bring awareness to climate change. Now, a breakthrough has been made as a group of scientists from Israel have developed a strain of bacteria that could...

Asteroids: Scientists find craters while studying near-earth object

Many might only know about space rocks hurtling towards our planets orbit every now and then. However, some scientists from Japan made an unusual discovery about one particular asteroid. Kope University Graduate School...

Geminids 2019 meteor shower to appear in the skies next week

Among the amazing phenomena that could be seen up in the sky is in the form of meteor showers. Many celestial being enthusiasts might look forward to the upcoming meteor shower by the Geminids next week. It is...

Asteroids: Meteorite crashes could be what formed tectonics on Earth

From what is known about meteors or asteroids, is that these rocks have been responsible for the extinction of the dinosaurs. However, experts say that these meteorite impacts could have been responsible for jump-starting...

Technology

‘The Sims 5’ expansion packs would feature familiar themes

The content roadmap of The Sims 5 is not too difficult to predict since the popular life simulation video game series has had familiar post-launch content packs over the years. This also makes it easier for avid fans to...

‘PUBG Mobile’ v0.16.0 arrives on December 11 without Erangel 2.0

The 0.16.0 update is the most awaited content for PUBG Mobile right now. Luckily, gamers will no longer have to guess when the patch is arriving, but they should also not expect the Erangel 2.0 map to launch with...

iPhone 12 paves way for Touch ID’s return

Apples next premium line of smartphones, now widely dubbed as iPhone 12, is anticipated to be the highlight of a new decade for the tech industry. Apple fans will be more excited about it as several sources claim that the...

Why Pixelbook Go is not ‘Pixelbook 2’, Google explains

Many Chromebook fans were expecting Google to release a follow-up on its high-end product, Pixelbook, this year. It has been in the market for over two years now. But the company, instead, announced Pixelbook Go that it...

iOS 14 could no longer support iPhone 6S, 6S Plus

The range of compatibility of iOS 14 is one topic that Apple fans are most curious about, aside from its new features and stability improvements. Apple has yet to address this matter, but there are speculations that the...
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